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BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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BOSTOl^ 
PUBLIC 
UBl^RY 




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REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



CITY COUNCIL OF BOSTON, 



FOR THE MUNICIPAL YEAR 



Commencing Monday, January 5th, 1874, and ending Monday, 

January 4th, 1875. 



BEING REPRINTS OF REPORTS AS PUBLISHED BY CONTRACT IN THE 

"BOSTON EVENING TRANSCRIPT." 



WITH 



A CLASSIFIED INDEX AND INTRODUCTORY NOTES, 

(Prepared under Supervision of the Superintendent of Printing.) 



[Sixitlx A.nnTial "Volixme.] 




BOSTON: 

PRESS OF ROCKWELL & CHURCHILL, CITY PRINTERS. 

(REPRINTS OF REPORTS FROM THE TRANSCRIPT PRESS.) 



INTRODUCTORY NOTE. 



-•-♦"^ 



The following Index has beon prepared in accordance with 
a vote of the Committee on Printing. In its compilation, 
the following topics are omitted, either as not being essen- 
tial, or as being better classified for reference in Depart- 
ment offices: — 



Standing Committees. See Pamphlet " Organization of 

City Government, 1874." 
City Officers. See Municipal Register, 1874. 
Police Officers and Special Police. See Police Department 

Records. 
Truant Officers. See School Department. 
Fire Department Officers and Members. See Department 

Report and Records. 
Jurors, list of, and jurors drawn. See City Clerk's Lists. 
Constables and Constables' Bonds. See City Clerk's Lists. 
Streets, betterments assessed and abated. See Records of 

Street Commissioners. 



Streets, temporary closing, and removal of obstructions. See 
Sup't Streets. 

Sewers, assessments made, abated, and postponed.' See 
Records of Sewer Department. 

Buildings, permits authorized. See Records of Inspector of 
Buildings. 

Public Buildings, use of granted. See Sup't Public Build- 
ings. 

Taxes, assessed and abated. See Assessors. 

Claims, allowed, and leave to withdraw, unless subjects of 
discussion. See Clerk of Committees. 

Auditor's Monthly Exhibits. See City Documents. 

Leases. See Auditor of Accounts. 

Licenses to Auctioneers, Undertakers, Victuallers, Pawnbrok- 
ers, Newsboys, Bootblacks, and for Steam Engines and 
Boilers, Hoisting Beams, Storage of Petroleum, Stables, 
Carriages, Wagons, Intelligence Offices, sale of Second- 
hand Articles, Billiard Halls, Exhibitions, ttc. See 
Lists and Records of City Clerk. 



Note relating to the City Publications. 



The Third Report of the Superintendent of Printing (City 
Document 114, 1873) contains a full explanatory list of the 
City Publications. The report is out of print in pamphlet 
form, but may be found in the bound volumes of 1873, vol. 4. 

Subsequent modifications of the above-mentioned list have 

occurred as follows: — 

A revised " Index to the City Documents, 1834 to 1874," com- 
piled by James M. Bugbee, has been printed in pamph- 
let form, and will be placed in the first volume of the 
bound set of Documents of 1874. 

Laws and Ordinances. — A volume has been issued, "com- 
prising all the Ordinances and parts of Ordinances passed 
by the City Council, and all the rules and regulations 
passed by the Board of Aldermen," from the date of the 
previous revision (Jan. 1st, 1870,) to August 1st, 1874. 

Drake's History of Boston. — A communication from Mr. 
Drake, stating his inability to proceed with this work, 
referred to the Committee on Printing, is now under 
advisement by the Committee. 

A Memorial of Charles Sumtier from the City of Boston has 
been issued, compi isiug the Action of the City Govern- 
ment, and of the citizens in Faneuil Hall, the Funeral 
Services, the Memorial Services, and the Eulogy by 
Hon. Carl Schurz. 

An Ordinance passed Sept. 29, 1874, requires the Printing 
Committee " to designate the number of public docu- 



ments, books or pamphlets" authorized by the City 
Council, and gives the City Messenger the "care, cus- 
tody and distribution of said documents, books and 
pamphlets, subject to such rules and regulations as the 
said Committee may adopt." 

An Ordinance passed Dec. 8, 1874, empowers the Printing 
Committee to " authorize the sale at an approximate cost 
price of any surplus bound copies of any such docu- 
ments, books or pamphlets." 

The Printing Committee have passed the following order: 
" Ordered, That the City Messenger be authorized to 
sell to parties applying therefor any surplus bound 
copies of the Revised Ordinances of 18C9, and of the 
Supplement thereto, at the following prices: Revised 
Ordinances of 18G9, $4.00 per copy; Supplement, 1870 
to 1874, in cloth, $1.00, in calf, $1.50." The Committee 
have also directed that the City Messenger continue to 
supply the Ordinances to members elect of the City 
Government, and the city publications to applicants in 
certain cases; and discontinue supplying the City Coun- 
cil Reports of Proceedings to persons not connected with 
the City Government, the Press excepted. The distri- 
bution of the city publications is discretionary with the 
City Messenger, when directions from the Committee 
are inapplicable. 

January 1, 1875. 



The first 29 lines on page 244 should follow the first col- 
umn on page 243. 



ERRATA. 

Page 510 is erroneously paged. 



INDEX TO PEOCEEDINGS IN CONVENTION. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CITY GOVERNMENT. 

January 5th, 1874. 

Pr.iyer by Rev. E. E. Halo, 1 

Oaths of office administorod to Hon. Samuel C. Cobb, Mayor- 

eleot, by lion. Horace Gray, Chief Justice of the Supreme 

Judichil Court, I 
Oaths of office atliniiiistered by Mayor to members-elect of each 

branch of City Council, 1 
Delivery of Mayor's Inaugural Address, 1 



Election and Qualification of City Clerk. 

Samuel F. MeCleary elected. 2 

Oath of office administered by Mayor, 2 



Election of Treasurek. 
Frederic U. Tracy elected, 306 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



ORGANIZATION AND REGULAR MEETINGS. 

Board called to order by City Clerk, 1 

Convention for qualification of members of City Government, 1 
John T. Claik elected chairman, 1 
Address of chairman, 1 

Notice to Common Council of organization of Board of Alder- 
men, 1 
Notice from Common Council of its organization, 1 
Convention for election of City Clerk, 2 
Mondays, i P. M., assigned for regular weekly meetings, 3 

ALPHABETICAL INDEX. 
Annexation — 

Subordinate employes retained, 2 

Boundary between Boston and Brookline, 179 

Notice of petition relating to annexation of Winthrop, 641 
Appropriations — 

Balances from Brighton, Charlestown, and West Roxbury 
added to corresponding appropriations, 17 

Order passed to pay W. Roxbury Free Library one-half the 
fees tor dog licenses, 66 

Discussion on the Appropriation Bill and orders passed, 166 

Discussion and concurrence in amendment to the Appropri- 
ation Bill, 179 

Communication from Auditor relating to the Appropri'ition 
Bill, and the bill amended l)y omission of State Tax, 189 

$1.50 per year for ringing Brighton bells, 300 

$344.35 for expenses incurred for delegation from select and 
Common Council, l^hiladelphia. 3.d9 

$400 rent per annum for Second Assistant District Attor- 
ney, 379 

$150 to pay funeral expenses of Mark W. Hayes, 553 

Order passed to i)ay bills for extra services of sundry city 
officers, 74S 
Appropriations — additional 

$3,300 for survey and inspection of buildings, 41, 47 

$10,000 for House of Correction, 41, 47 

$5,000 for Bridges, 53, 64 

$8,000 for Ferries, 115, 151 

$10,000 for Overseers of the Poor, 115, 150, 151 

$36,000 for FireDept., 117, 150, 151 

$10,000 for House of Industry. 140, 151 

$5,200 for new I'rimary School-house, E. B., 376, 408 

$250 for Police Stations, 461 

$27,000 for Bennett Grammar School, Brighton, 499, 513 

$4,400 for Grammar School, Ward 15, 510, 514 

$2,000 for land corner of Roxbury and King Sts., 516 

$700 for lamp repair shop, 540 

Request for $50,000 by Cochituate Water Board, 540 

Request for $5,000 for Armories, 683 

$500 for Roxbury and King St. School-house site, 585 

Request for $27,000 additional for Public Buildings, 682 



Appropriations — transfers authorized — 

$760 fmm Reserved Fund to Common, 47 

$1,730.39 from Pauper Expenses to House of Industry, 151 

$16,376.42 from widening Hanover St., No. 2, to widening 
Hanover St,, 151 

$6,000 from Reserved Fund to Mt. Hope Cemetery receiv- 
ing tomb, 449 

$2,500 from Reserved Fund for standpipe connection, Public 
Library, 596 

$5,000 from Reserved Fund to .\rmories, 597 

$1,200 from Quarantine for repairs on steamer Samuel Lit- 
tle, 627 

$30,000 from Water Works, to waterworks in Wards 13, 
14, 15, and 16, 556 

$20,000 from Reserved Fund to water works in Wards 13, 
14, 15, and 16, 556 

$1,500 from Incidental Expenses to Contingent Fund for 
Board of Aldermen, 5-56 

$27,700 from Reserved Fund to Bennett Grammar School, 
Brighton, 513 

$4,400 from Reserved Fund to Grammar School, Ward 15, 
513 

$2,000 from Reserved Fund to Cottage Place School-house 
site, 513 

$700 from Reserved Fund to Common and Public Grcunds, 
513 

$77,000 from Resei-ved Fund to widening Shawmut Avenue, 
708 

$73,000 from Reserved Fund to widening Commerce St., 707 

$42,000 from Reserved Fund to widening Leverett St., 708 

$2,900 from Reserved Fund to widening Clinrcn St. Dist., 708 

$27,000 from Reserved Fund to PublicBuildings, 708 

$48.36 to Grammar School site. Ward 15. TOS 

$2,000 from Quarantine to steamer Samuel Little, 767 
Appleton Temporary Home — 

Com. from Supt. referred, 682 

Report accepted, leave to withdraw, 716 
Armories — sei' Militia, 
Assessors' Dept. — 

Order passed to pay $2,500 for extra clerk-hire. 1.50 

Order passed to pay for sale of od record books, 262 
Auditor of Accounts — 

Estimates for 1874-5 referred, 115 

Authorized to transfer funds, 151 

Statement to Board of Aldermen relating to $200,000 for ad- 
ditional Stale tax, 181 

Order relating to annual report, 256, 262 

Annual report of Leases, 266 

Annual report, 410 

Com. relating to execution for damages in Church St. Dist., 
678 



Badges — 

Refunding cost to Charlestown Police, 39, 47 



72, 84 



INDEX TO PUOCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



Biillnst T.ightcrg — 

Ko»i(;iiati()ii of Abijali R. Tcwksbury, 542 

Quaiterly Ki-ports of Wtigliurs and Inspectors, 8, 192,410, 
482, 553 

Report accepted, and Weighers and Inspectors elected to fill 
vacancicH, 742 
Ralhs — see rublic Baths. 
Bigi'low (Alderman) — remarks: on 

Removal of I'addock Elms, 76 

Running Ferry Tolls, 120 

Jourdain's Museum of Anatomy, 121 

Betterment assessed on Parker-Memorial Meeting House, 204 

Kxpenses of Common and Public Grounds, 226, 416 

Bird houses, 303 

Sale of licenses to pawnbrokers, etc., 390 

Barnum's Hippodrome, 455 

Curbstone for Tremont Street Mall, 462 

Licensing \V;ilcott's Hotel. 543. 5f2. 582 

Alleged frauds in Sudbury scheme, 641 

The l.aw Department, 736, 748 

Kast Cambridge omnibus line, 748 
Birds — 

William R. Falls, — authorized, to take, etc., 48 
Board of Health — sec Health, Board of. 
Bonds — (see also Loans) 

Order passed to consider expediency of conversion of 
Charlestown Bonds, 435 

Duplicate to Mary C. Gibbcns authorized, 686 
Bonds of City Officers — 

Committee for annual examination, 321 

Examination reported and accepted, 562 
Boston & Albany R R. Co. — 

Order passed to erect gates at crossings on Marginal and 
Sumner Streets. 343 

Location accepted, 739 

Sale of baggage, 74i», 767 
Boston & Providence Railroad — 

Remonstrance on use of whistles, 204 
Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn R. Co. — 

Revised order of notice issued, 165 

Hearing on location, 220 

Order passed fixing location, 269 
Bridges — 

Federal Street, annual report of Superintendent, 8 

Dover Street, " " 8 

Broadway, " " 8 

Meridian Street, " " 8 

Mt, Washington Av., •' " 8 

Chelsea Street, " " 8 

Order passed for repairs, 499 

Order passed to provide for elections of certain Superin- 
tendents, 8 

Charles Hiver and Warren, report of commissioner, 29 

Maiden, Charlestown, payment of expenses, 39 

Charlestown and Brighton, order passed allowing superin- 
tendents same compensation, 6ti 

Longwood Avenue, $750 for repairs, 92 

Dartmouth Street. $292.48 for repairs, 92 

Meridian Street, order passed to close for repair-', 121 

order passed to repair sidewalks, 170 

North Harvard Street, order passed for repairs, 170 

Superintendent appointed. 461 

Western Avenue, order passed for repairs, 170 

Cragie's, order passed to close for repairs, 209 

Chelsea Street, closed for repairs, 225 

Western Avenue, " 225 

Broadway " 226 

Dover Street, discussion on compensation for assistance to 
Superintendent, 254 

discussion, and order passed rel.ative to salary of Super- 
intendent. 263 

Ncponset Bridge, repairs, 260, 302, 514, 527 

Order passed to consider expediency of constructing bridge 
over Boston & Providence R.R., beyond Forest Hills 
Station, 287 

Broadway, order passed to remove old draw and build new 
one, 306 

Report accepted, inexpedient and impracticable to make 
temporary provision for travel, 341 

Maiden Bridge, order parsed for temporary closing, 343 

Report and ordinance, 360 

Ordinance passed to provide Superintendent for Charles- 
town Bridges, 371 

Eastern Avenue, report and order for construction, 402, 408 

Broadway, report and order passed to repair approaches, 415 

Francis Caverly appointed Superintendent of bridge over 
Charles River, near Cottage Farm Station, 427 

Warren, Charles II. Marple appointed Superintendent, 431 

Charles River, Joel R, Bolan appointed Superintendent, 431 

Maiden Bridge, John Howard appointed Superintendent, 431 

Ferdinand Street, repairs authorized, 451 

Western .Avenue, orders to close and repair, 451 

Order passed for application to build over South Bay, 471 

Warren Bridge, Superintendent elected, 5ii8 

Charles River, " " 508 

AV'arren, order passed to close for repairs, 574 

Eastern Ave., order passed authorizing change in contract, 
674 



Order passed for bridge on Ashland Street, 578 

License from Harbor Com, for extension of Swett Staeet, 

553 
Order passed for bridge over N. Y, & K. E. Railroad on 

Athens Street. 514 
Discussion on raising grade of Prison Point Bridge. 516 
Dorchester Ave., order passed to close for repairs, 585 
Albany Street, closed for repairs, 740 
Brooks (.Alderman)— remarks: on 
Smith's Hiding School, 51 
Widening of Atlantic Avenue, 64 
The Park question, 71 
Railroad crossings in East Boston, 73 
Removal of Paddock Elms, 76 
Salaries of officers in Charlestown Court. 90 
Salaries of city officers, 91, 93, 117, 153, 205 
The Water Supply, 104, 371 
Running of Ferry tolls, 120 
Consolidation of Water Boards, 371, 400 
Jourdain's Museum of Anatomy, 121 
Appropriation Bill, 167 
Act to legalize Normal School, 172 
Placing Milk Inspector under Board of Health, 182 
Horse Railway system, 192 
Watering streets, 193 
Salaries of Registrars of Voters. 224, 242 
Dummy engine on Union Freight Railway, 224 
Removing b.allast from Long Island, 252 
Assistance to Superintendent Dover-street bridge, 264 
Allowance for Decoration Day, 2ti6, 271 
Water-shed of Mystic Lake, 285 
Altering old High School-house for armory, 314 
Allowance for Fourth of July, 314 
Purchase of land for Small-pox hospital, 360 
Appointing physicians to examine water qualities, 338, 361 
Additional copies of Sumner Memorial, 321 
Interest on unpaid taxes, 352 
Free open-air concerts, 3.53 
District Municipal Courts, 3.39 
Disposal of Boston Post estate, 379 
Allowing police officers free passes over ferries, 390 
Charging tor licenses to pawnbrokers, etc., .390 
S.ilaries of constables at Municipal District Courts, 408 
Watering Warren Street, Roxbury, 415 
Rate of interest on unpaid taxes, 427 
Erection of Grammar School-house, Charlestown, 429 
Establishing public urinals, 44y 
AVatering I'ark Square, 450, 4-36 
New receiving tomb. Mount Hope, 449 
Salaries of officers in district courts. 451 
Defective conductors on buildings, 452 
Cleaning and painting Public Library, 462 
Petition of Highland Street Railway Co. to use Metropolitan 

Railway tracks. 473 
Home for the I'oor, 475, 509, 515, 582 
Reinoving gravel from I^ong Island, 492 
Enforcement of the grade law, 493 
The vacation, 494 
Cellars below grade, 495 

Erection of fountain in Independence Square, 500 
Extension of 'riiorndike Street, ,529 
Municiiial Court Room, East lioston, 530 
Metropolitan .and Highland Railroads, 553 
Paving City I'assagew.ays, 571 
Vacancies in Water Board, 599 
Evening Drawing School in East Boston, 601 
Licensing 1 'lumbers, 610 
Furnishing Court Rooms, 013 
Charles River w.ater supply, 628 
Alleged frauds in Sudbury scheme, 641 
Soup for the I'oor, 662, 6S-* 
Widening School Street, 688 

Boston W.ater Power Co. and Back Bay Streets, 711 
Nautical School, 713 
Water supply for Wards 17 and 19, 715 
Extension of'Swett Street, 720 
The l.aw Dep.artment, 737 
N.aming Post Office ."Square, 740 
Compens.ation for clerical services, 741 
Faneuil Hall sidewalk, 752 
Buildings — 

Order passed for Com. on Ordinances to consider expedi- 
ency of giving Com. on Buildings power to decide 

questions referred by City Council. 30 
Boston Gaslight Co. authorized to build coal elevator, 39 
Order passed in regard to removal of snow from roofs, 63 
Discussion on petition of Trustees of Boston College, 65 
Order passed relating to two additional Inspectors, 72 
Order passed relatiiif to Boston College, 76 
Non-concurrence with Council, on substitute order relating 

to Boston College. 84 
Report of Inspector. 89 
Report accepted. City Council cannot delegate powers to 

Committee, 170 
Ordin.ance passed relative to eight assistant inspectors, 170 
Report accepted granting le.ave to Shawmut Ave. Baptist 

( hureh to project two gas-lamps over doors. 223 
Report accepted on party wall, M. Whiting's estate, 225 



INDEX TO PKOCEEDIXOS OF BOAED OF ALDERMEN. 



Report iuul Older relating to conditions placed on estates on 

Ho. Miuiu-t Si , 227. 'IM 
Projecting lanterns at 84 and SO Friend St. authorized. 25:5 
Order passed fur sale of Boston t'ost estate, uor. Waaler and 

Devonshire Sts., ;579 
Semi-annual report of Inspector, July 1. 430 
Order passed for repair.-* and alterations on Harbor Master's 

oflice, Eastern Ave. Wliarf. 4o2 
Order passetl relative to water from roofs, 43.5 
Com. authorized to issue permits during recess, 448 
Discussion on discharge of w.-iter from I'oofs and sides of 

Buildings into public streets, 452 
Report from Chief of Police of buildings discharging water 

into streets, 475 
Inspector requested to refuse permits, until satisfied by 

inspection of grade. 478 
Sundry j)ersons ordered to alter and reconstruct cellars up 

to grade, 478 ; reconsideration moved, and motion laid on 

table, 479 
Discussion on enforcement of the grade law, 493 
Discussion on cellars below grade, 494 
Report from Itispector, of cellars below grade, 525 
O. L. Shaw eontirmed as Inspector. 54t) 
Order ijassed directing sundry persons to raise grade of 

cellars, 50) 
Report, diseus.sion, and order passed directing sundry per- 
sons to alter cellars below grade. 584 
Report accejjted, leave to withdraw, on extending building 

limits, 5'J8 
Cellars authorized below grade, 643, 690 
Projecting lantern authorized front of Bromfield Street 

Church, 7UG 
Cemeteries — 

Cedar Grove, committee appointed, 40 

Evergreen, AVard 19, order passed to set apart income to de- 

fraj' expenses, 06 
Report accepted authorizing Patrick Traeey and others to 

establish cemetery in West lloxbury, 193 
Woodltiwn, communication from proprietors, 2'22 
Mt. Hope, annual report, 252 
Cedar Grove, annual report, 316 
Report accepted relating to undertakers holding agencies, 

401 
Mt. Hope, report relating to building receiving tomb, 431 
Woodlawn, contract annulled, 435 

Discussion on $0,000 for receiving tomb, Mt. Hope, 449 
Mt. Hope, communication from trustees requesting $4,200 

additional for new receiving tomb, 4S2; referred to Com. 

on Mt. Hope Cem.,with leave to rejjort to either branch, 

482 
Report accepted inexpedient to grant appropriations, 555 
City Architect — 

Discussion on, and order passed relating to, 282 
City Clerk — 

Quarterly report, 36, 471, 252, 600 
City Council — 

$1,.500 additional authorized for Transcript Reports of Pro- 
ceedings, 226 
Order passed to advertise for proposals for publishing ab- 
stract of proceedings, 239 
Com. from Globe Pub. Co. and discussion on the contract 

for publishing the oflicial report, 30J 
Report accepted no action necessary respecting award of 

contract for reporting and printing proceedings, 491 
Communication relative to funeral of Councilman B;irnes, .505 
Kotice of vacancy, by decease of H. B. Barnes, and order 

passed for tilling same, 525 
Invitation accepted to witness parade of Roman Catholic 

Temperance Soc., 525 
Invitation accepted to attend dedication of Brighton Branch 

Library, 507 
Resolves jjassed relating to decease of ex-mayor Shurtleff, 

673 
Order passetl to provide documents, 767 
City Engineer ^ 

Authorized to make purch.ases, 48 
City Hall — see Public Buildings. 
City Hospital — 

Resignation of Charles J. Prescott accepted, 8 

Donation from George Goodnow, 251 

Thanks to George Goodnow for gift of $1,000, and order 

passed for investment, 390 
Annual report, 500 

Asa H. Caton elected to fill vacancy, 555 
Order passed relative to greenliouse, 559 
Report of Trustees accepted relative to greenhouse, 579 
City Registrar — 

Quarterly report, 36, 252, 505, 600 

Committee on Cemeteries changed to Committee on City 

Registrar's Department, 40 
Annual report, 339 
City Scales — 

Quarterly report North Scales, 611 

Haymarket Sq., Quarterly report of Superintendent, 47, 252 
City Solicitor — ^see Law Department 
City Stables — 

Order passed to sell City Stables on Polk St., Charlestown, 

513 



$10,000 authorized for shed and storeroom at South and 

West Stables, 514 
Order passed setting apart addition to new city stable lot at 

Highlands, 540 
City Publications — 

Order relating to general charge and disposal of, 270, 2S2 

Ordinance passed, 530 

Concurrence in amendment relating to sale, 540 

Order passed for printing index for City Documents, 556 

Ordinance passed allowing srde, 078 

History of Boston, communication from Samuel G. Drake, 

relinquishing contract, 6J0 
City Surveyor — 

Annual report, 16 
Authorized to purchase supplies, 37 
Claims — 

Order passed to pay Smith & McGaragle $5,000 insurance, 

48 
General order passed authorizing payment of lost coupons, 

64 
Report accepted (leave to withdraw) on petition of Charles 

Burrill, 136 
Order passed to petition for authority to pay certain bills, 

483 
Clark (.\lderman) — elected chairman, 1 ; — remarks: on 
Smith's Riding School, 51 
Widening of Atlantic .\ venue. 64 
Petition of Trustees of Boston College, 65 
The I'ark question, 08 
Removal of I'addock Elms, 75, 87 
Salaries of city oflicers. 90. 157 

Sale of land to Massachusetts Cliaritable Meclianic Associa- 
tion, 123 
Death of Hon. Charles Sumner. 127 
Metropolitan R. 11. Stable on Back Bay, 139 
Water street extension, 168 
Betterment assessed on Parker Memorial Meeting-house, 

204 
Expenses of Common and Public Grounds, 226 
Common and Public Grounds, 304 
Interest on unpaid taxes, 33S 

Order to pay expenses Committee on S. B. Flats, 341 
Disposal of Bo-ton I'ost estate, 379 
Consolidation of Water Boards, 396 
Widening Brattle Street, 430 
Ve tilation of City Hall, 448 
Cellars below grade, 495 
Feeding horses in streets, .546 
Fast driving. 661 

Double tracks on Wash. Street, 651 
Boston Water Power Co. and Back Bay Street, 637 
Extension of Commerce Street, 708 
Extension of Swett Street, 714, 719, 723 
Compensation for clerical services, 741 
Citizens' Gaslight Co., 745, 750 
The Law Department, 748 
Faneuil Hall sidewalk, 752 
Valedictory address, 768 
Clocks — 

Order passed to accept clock on church of South Evangelical 

Society, West lloxbury, 390 
Cochituate — see Water. 
Common Council — 

Order passed to pay $500 additional to Clerk, 767 
Committees — see Introductory Note; also Special Committees 
Common and Public Grounds — (see also Public Park) 

Request for appropriation of $750 for temjtorary plank walk 

on mall from Park Street to Boylston Street, .30. 
$2,000 authorized Blackstone and Franklin Squares, 226 
$900 " care of grounds and trees in East Bos- 

ton, 226 
$10,000 " Common, Public Garden, and other pub- 

lic grounds, 220 
$2,500 " purchasing of trees, shrubs, and seeds, 

226 
$1,200 " manure, 220 

$1,000 " tools, machines, and repairs, 226 

$2,000 " hire of teams, 226 

$10,000 " labor and loam for Washington Park, 

226 
$5,000 " red gravel for paths on public grounds, 

226 
$2,000 " watering streets, etc., 22R 

$800 " rustic arbor on Public Garden, 226 

$700 " loam for public grounds, 220 

$1,650 " care of Blackstone, Franklin, Worcester, 

and Lowell Squares, and Union Park, 
220 
$600 " for teamwork on Common, etc., 579 

$5,000 " labor on public grounds, 579 

$800 " fences, 594 

$203.50 " improvement of Eagle Sq., So. Boston, 

594 
$112..50 " loam, 594 

Ancient and Honorable Artillery Co. authorized to fire 

salutes, June 1st, 239 
Order passed to ascertain cause of destruction of trees, 264 
$1,500 authorized for bird houses, 303 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF BOAKD OF ALDEKMEN. 



Explaiintion by Cliainnaii of Committee relating to Com- 
mon, '.i^i 
$'J,40i) ad.litioiial for laying out ami grading, setting edge- 
stone and erecting fence, to sciuare on Commonwealth 
Avenue, 339 
$t?0() additional for loam, and glO.OOO for labor, 390 
4!i),'):ln for iilaiils for I'nlilio (iarden and Scjnarcri, 390 
$l,iiM) aildilional for iniiiroving l-'rankliu and Blackstonc 

S.juares, 410 
$1,000 additional for team work, 416 
$,S0O additional for purehase of sods, 410 
$2,2')0 for lumber, carpentering, mason-work, and painting, 

410 
Order iiassed to sell old greenhouse on Public Garden, 462 
Report and order relating to curbstone on Tremont Street 

mall, 402 
Order passed to consider expediency of purchasing estate 

adjoining Orchard I'ark, 471 
Discussion on erection of fountain in Intlependence Sq., 500 
Order passed to improve square on Commonwealth Ave., 500 
Order passed for improvement of triangular lot bounded by 

Eagle, Trenton, and I'rescott Sts., K. Boston, 500 
Order passed for improvement of Wasliington I'ark, 500 
Order passed to ])laee fountain in Independence 8q., 510 
Order passed relative to proposed new square on Back Bay, 

562 
Report accoi)ted, and reference to next City Council, relating 

to proposed square on Hack Bay, 742 
$50 additional for triangular lot. E, Boston, 742 
§232.30 additional for lumber, carpentering, mason work, 

and paiaung, 742 
$401.02 additional for tools and repairs, 742 
Contingent Expenses — 

Chairman of Board of Aldermen authorized to approve bills, 
19 
Count J- of Snftblk — 

Oriler pasi-ed to fit up rooms for Sheriff and Assistants, 8 
Jail expenses, 29, 150, 236, 301, 306, 371, 457, 498, 540, 579, 641, 

740 
Order passed for repairs for Court House, Probate Building, 

and Municipal Court rooms, 30 
Order fixing pay of officers attending Municipal Court, 

Charlestown, 39, 119 
Hearing on new Court House, 103 
Committee for inspection of prisons appointed, 115 
Order passed authorizing arrangements with Register of 

Deeds for classifii'd indices for 1874, 241 
Order to provide additional Municipal Court accommodations 

in old Oily Hall, Charlestown, 300 
Order |)assed to jjrovide court rooms and lock-ups for dis- 
trict Jlunicipal Courts, 359 
Com. from Judges new Municipal Courts, notifying appoint- 
ment of officers, etc., referred to Com., 371 
Court rooms for new District Municipal Courts established, 

377 
Order passed to select and report suitable site for new Court 

House, 377 
Court room for So. Boston Disl., changed in location, 402 
Order passed to provide necessary law-books for new 

Municipal Dist. Courts, 408 
Report on prison, etc., 400 
Old M^ashington School-house, order passed to fit up second 

story for Municipal Court, Higldand Dist., 461 
Discussion, and orders passed relative to fitting up and fur- 
nishing rooms for Municipal Court, East Boston, 530 
Surety to Treasurer's bond referred, 541 

Vote reconsidered, referring treasurer's bond, and bond ap- 
proved, 556 
Petition from Suffolk Bar, for new Court House, 568 
Discussion and orders passed relating to furnishing Brigh- 
ton and So. Boston (-ourt rooms, 613 
Report and discussion on site for jiroposcd new Court 

House, 045 
Order passed to consider and rejiort upon enlargement of 
present Court House, and erecting new house near jail, 
645 
Order passed relative to classified indices, 695 
Report on rooms for Dorchester Mnn. Court, 742 
Order p.-vssod to provide furniture for Alunicipal Court 

room, Dorchester, 748 
Second semi-annual report of Committee on Prisons, 707 
County of Middlesex — 

Order passed for collection of rent duo for Police court room 
in Ciiarlestown, 241 
Cutter (.VIdcrnian) — Kemarks: on 
Wilson's lintel, Ward 19, 20,41 
Smith's Hiding School, 39. 61 
Payment of badges, for Charlestown Police. 47 
Printing e.Mra copies of reports on Water Supply, 40, 54 
The Park question, 63 
Charging for use of Atlantic Ave., 72 
Placing Inspector of Milk under Board of Health, 72 
Railroad Ciossings in East Boston, 73 
Itemoval of Taddoek Elms, 74, 87, 92 
Ijicense for Plumbers, 82 
Consolid.ition of Water Board-", 70, 213, 375 
Salaries of officers of Charlestown Court. 90 
Salaries of city officers, 91, 93, 110. 153, 2U5, 215 



The Water Supply, 104, 371 
Police and I'Ire Boat, 120 
De.ath of Hon. Charles Sumner, 126 
Railway station at Cliestnut-Hill Reservoir, 136 
Sale of Fort-Hill property. 15J 
Appropriation Bill, 100, 179 
Water-street extension, 168 
Act to legalize Normal School, 172, 195, 213 
Water St. widening, 181 

Removal of office of Milk Inspector, 182, 194, 288, 362 
Horse Railway system, 191 
Watering streets, 193 

Betterments assessed on the Parker Memorial meeting- 
house, 204 
Elevator in City Hall, 115. 221 
Salaries of Registrars of Vot(?rs, 223, 240, 242 
Dummy engine on Union Freight R. R., 224 
Additional Appropriation for printing proceedings of City 

Council, 227 
Allowance for Decoration Day, 236, 206. 270 
Assistance to Supt. Dover St. Bridge, 254, 263 
Wood pavement in Kilby St., 267, 287 
A City Architect, 28:i 
Water-shed of Mystic Lake, 284 
Appropriation for paving Kilby St., 287 
Taking old High Si-lioidhouse, cor. Dorchester Ave. and 

Gibson St. for Armory, 289 
Hampden St. Dist., 300 
Bird houses. 303 
Allowance for Fourth July, 314 

I'urchasc of land for .Smail-pox hospital, 317, 360 

Additional copies of Sumner Memorial. 321 
I'roiection of Police Uinforms at fires, 322 
J. W. Bartleit's patent torch, 335 

Widening Shawmut Ave. between Dudley and Gould Sts., 
336 

Appointment of engineers to examine Water Supply. 336 

Appointing physicians to examine water qualities, 338, 361 

Interest on unpaid taxes, 33S, 3-j2, 427 

Older to pay S. B. Ileustis for extra service. 340 

Order to pay expenses of Cora, on S. B. Flats, 341 

Free open-air concerts, 3.j2 

Order to jjave Water St. with wood. 358 

Sale of City's land on Pleasant and Elliot Sts., 436 

District Municipal Courts, 3-59 

Site for new Court House, 377 

Taking Beach St. I'resbyterian Church, 378 

Allowing police officers free passes over the ferries, 389 

Sale of licenses to pawnbrokers, etc.. 390 

Salaries of constables in Municipal Dist. Courts, 408 

Watering Warren St, Roxbury. 414 

Expenditures for Common and Public Grounds, 416 

Erection of Grammar School-house, Charlestown, 428 

Sale of City's land on Elliot and Pleasant Sts., 436 

Ventil.-ition of City Hall, 447 

Establishing public urinals. 449 

New receiving tomb, Mt. Hope, 449 

^V^atering Park Sq., 4.J0, 456 

Salaries of ofiicers in district courts, 451 

Defective conductors on buildings, 452 

Using wood pa\'enient on G( Id and Silver Sts., 453 

Cleaning ami painting Public Library, 461 

I'etition of Middlesex It. Co. to use Metropolitan R. tracks, 
472 

Home for the Poor, 477, 502, 508, 615, 580 

'I'he vacation, 494 

Cell.ars below grade, 494, 584 

Allowing fast riding, 499 

Erection of fountain in Independence Sq., 500 

Middlesex Railroad in State St., 536 

Wood pavements in Devonshire St., 499, 527 

Extension of Liniox St.. 529 

" " Tliorndike St., 529 

Municipal Cnurt Room. East Boston, 530 

Repairs of armories, 540 

Surely to Treasuier's Bond, 541 

Licensing Walcott's Hotel. 544, 582 

Metriiporit.in use of Highland Railroad track, 553 

Number of horse-cars in streets, 556 

Widening Guild row, 566 

Armory expenses, 56i) 

Paving city passageways, 570, 586 

Public Park, 594 

Pumping engir.eat Lake Cochiluate, 598 

Evening drawing school in E. Boston, 600, 614 

Licensing I'lumbers, 610 

Fast driving. 611 

Furnishing court rooms, 613 

Charles River water supply. 623 

General Butler's offer of Sudbury River, 630 

Alleged frauds in Sudbury scheme, 641 

Site forncw Court House, 645 

P.lockades on Tremont St., 693 

Paving in front of Kaneuil Hall. 648 

Double tracks on Wash. St.. 647, 651 

Soup for the I'oor, 062, 678, 717 

Wiileniiig .School St., 6-i8 

Boston Water Power Co. and Back Bay Streets, 695, 712 



INDEX TO TROCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF ALUSiniEX. 



Exceeding appi-opriations, 708 
Nautical School, 71'2 
Water Supply foi- Wards 17 and 19, 715 
Swelt St. Hxieiision, 717 
The Law Department, 738, 748 
Naming I'osl OHico Square, 740 
Compensation fur clerical services, 741 
Citizens' Ga^litrht Co., 744, 750 
Faneuil Hall sidewalk, 751 
Kesolntion of Thanks to chairman, 768 
Dedham-st. District — 

Order pass('d to petition for authority to raise grade, 525 
Report and order in new draft passed to petition, 504 

Eastern Raih-oad — 

Order and discussion on change of terminus, 67 

Discussion and order passed rel.ating to railroad crossings, 73 

Order passed for flagman at crossing on Bennington St., 167 

Notice received of location of freight track, 330 
East Boston Ferries — see Ferries. 
Elections — 

State — Notice of vacancy of seat of John Tewkshury, Ward 
3, and order passed for election, 36 

Nathaniel .1. l?ust electe<I representative in Ward 3, 53 

Warrant for State election, order passed, 563 

Report of returns .accepted, 000, 6U6 

New election ordered tor Ward 17, 606 

Report accepted, .Joseph S. Ropes elected in Ward 17, 640 

Municipal — Warrants for City Election, 648 

Municipal — Ueport of returns accepted, 707 

Reports accepted on recounts of votes .at City Election, 742 
Emery (AMerman) — remarks : 

The I'ark question, 18, 6S 

Wilson's Hotel, Ward 10, 20, 40 

Petition of 'J'rustees of Boston College, 65 

Salaries of city officers, 91, 94, 116, 156, 205, 214 

Leasing No. 30 Pemberton Sq., 118 

Runnitig ferry tolls, 120 

Consolidation of Water Boards, 375, 400 

Appropriation Bill, 166 

Act to legalize Normal School, 171 

Removalof office of Milk Inspector, 182, 288, 362 

Elevator in City Hall, 221 

Salaries of Registrars of Voters, 224, 242 

Allowance for Decoration Day, 237, 265 

ACitv Architect, 283 

Water-slied of Mystic Lake, 284 

Taking old lligh'School-house for armory, 289, 314 

Allowance for Fourth -July, 316 

Purchase of hand for small-pox hospital, 317, 300 

J. W. Bartlett's patent torch, 335 

District Municipal Court, 350, 402 

Appointing physicians to examine water qualities, 361 

Site for new Court House, 377 

Taking Beach-st. Presbyterian Church, 378 

Allowing police officers free passes over ferries, 391 

Erection of (irammar School-house, Charlestown, 428 

Ventilation of City Hall, 435, 447 

Sale of City's laud on Pleasant and Eliot Sts., 436 

License to lienj. Jones to sprinkle Park Sq., 450 

Defective conductors on buildings, 452 

Standpipes in public buildings, 453 

Cleaning and painting Public Library, 4G1 

Petition of Middlesex R. Co. to use Metropolitan R. tracks, 47 

Hemic for the Poor, 474, 501, .508, 515, 582 

Enforcement of the Grade Law, 493 

Municipal Court Room, East Boston, 530 

Licensing Walcott's Hotel, ■^■^■^> o62 

Feeding horses in streets, 546 

Fast driving, 562, 611 

Evening Schools, 564 

I'aving litv i).assagewaj'S, .570, 586 

Public Park, 594 

Standpi|HS in School-houses, 599 

Furnisliing court rooms, 613 

Evening drawing school in East Boston, 615 
Site for new Court House, 645 
Blockades on Tremont St., 046,693 
Exceeding appropriations, 709 

Boston Watir Power Co. and Back Bay Streets, 712 
Citizens Gaslight Co., 744, 750 
South Boston Branch Library, 742 
Resolution of Thanks to the Mayor, 767 
Employment for the Poor — 

Discussion, non-concurrence on reference to special Com 
mittee, aud order rejected, 662 



- sec Public Buildings, 
-see Streets. 



Faneuil Hall 
Fast driving- 
Ferries — 

Report accepted relating to running tolls, letting down 

chains, etc.. 102 
Order passed for new drop and tank at South Ferry, and 

coal-shed at North Ferry, 193 
Order passed to rei)air avenues in city projjer aud East Bos- 
ton leading to Xorth Ferry, 193 
Annual report, 252 



Discussion and order passed allowing police officers in uni- 
form to pass free, 389 
Resignation of Daniel D. Kelly as Director, 498 
Samuel B. Hopkins elected Director, to till vacancy, 545 
Fire Alarms — 

Commissioners authorized to pay Joseph Winlock $500 for 
true time, 562, 567 
Fire Department — 

Report of Commissioners for Janu-iry, 53 

Reports from Fire Commissioners on locating fire engines, 

etc., 90 
Report of Commissioners for Feb., 115 
Order passed for increase of members, 115, 169 
Report of Commissioners for March, 205 
Reply of Fire Commissioners on locating engine on Charles 

St., 222 
Engine House authorized for Engine 22, 264 
'' " " " " 3,264 

Report of Commissioners for April, 267 
Report of Commissioners for May, 339 
Leave granted ,Tosei)h Bird to test Johnson pump, 379 
Order passed relative to locating telegraph lines to Brighton, 

474 
Report for July, 484 

First annual report of Commissioners, 488 
Order passed to allow $1.50 to pay funeral expenses of Mark 

W. Hays, 553 
Report of Commissioners for Oct., 611 
Communication relating to telegraph poles on Atlantic Ave., 

612 
Report accepted, protection in Ward 17, 662 
Report of Commissioners, 687 
Fort Hill Improvement — 

Order passed referring unfinished business to special Com- 
mittee, 9 
Order passed for removal of temporary buildings, 226 
Order passed to ex.amine title, and report authority of City 
Council to prescribe mode of use, 471 
Fort Hill Wharf— 

Order passed to place in charge of Paving Dept., 282 
Lease authorized, 391 
Fourth July — 

Committee appointed, appropriation, and discussion, 314 
Franklin Fund — see Funds. 
Funds — 

Franklin Fund, Report of Treasurer, 150 

loan to Robert J. Gilkie, 84, 118 

report of auditing committee, 181 

communication from Mass. Charitable Mechanic Asso- 
ciation relating to investment in buildings for mechanics' 
houses, 369 
Report and order relating to trust funds, received by annex- 
ation, 286, 3U0 
Statement of accounts of Dorchester Trust Funds, 301 
Report accepted of auditing of Gibson and Stoughton funds, 

376 
Order passed relating to " Trustees of Charlestown Poor 

Fund," 492 
Report accepted of Charlestown Poor's Fund, 545 

G. A.R.— 

Invitation of Post 26 to Dccor.ation ceremonies accepted, 211 

Allowance for Decoration Day, 236, 264, 271 
Gas — 

Hearing on Citizens' Gaslight Co., 608, 624, 663, 679 

Reports on Citizens' Gaslight Co., 706 

Report accepted, leave to withdraw, on City Gas Works, 
707 

Citizen's Gaslight Co., Discussion on, 743; Discussion on, 
and report accepted, leave to withdraw, 750 
Hack Pegulations — 

Order passed amending, 1-10 

Reiwrt and orders relating to Charlestown, West Roxbury 
and Hrighton, 319, 337 

Amendment adopted relating to drivers carrying copy of 
rates, o59 
Hall (AMerman) — remarks: on 

Smith's Riding School, .54, 598 

Petition of Trustees of Boston College, 65 

Removal of Paddock Elms, 74, 92 

Sahiries of officers of Charlestown C<nirt, 90 

Salaries of city ollicers, U5, 117, 206, 214 

Running ferry tolls, 120 

Jourdaiu's Museum of Anatomy, 122 

Consolidation of Water Boards, 371, 395 

Railway Station at C;hestnut Hill reservoir, 137 

Metropolitan K. R. Stable on Back Bay, 139 

Appropriation Bill, 167, 179 

Office of Milk Inspector, 288, 362 

Elevator in City Hall, 222 

Salaries of Registrars of Voters, 224, 240, 242 

Dummy engine on Union Freight Hallway track, 224 

Ailditional appropriation for printing proceedings of City 
Council, 227 

Allowance for Decoration Day, 237, 266, 271 

Assistance to Superintendent'Dover-strcet Bridge, 264 

Wood p.avement in Kilby Street, 268 



8 



INDEX TO riiOCEEDIXGS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEX, 



■Wsitor-Kluvl of Myxtic T>ake, 285 

Appniiniatiiiii l"iir paviiii; Kilby Street, 287 

Taking' olil llitrli tjchool-liouse," cor. Durcliester Avenue and 

(iibsoii Street, for armory, 2Si) 
Contraet with Dorehet^ter Ga'slif^ht Co., 302 
Kxteiiiling name of Dudley Street llmnigU Stoughton Street, 

ai;i. 

AUowanee for Fourth July, .")14 

Additional eopieM Sumner Memorial, 321 

J. W. IJartletl's patent toreli, IW) 

Widening Sliawmut Avenue between Dudley and Guild 

Streets, 330 
Appoiiitnuiit of enginccra to examine water supply, 336 
Free open-air eoncertij, 353 
Order to pave Water Street with wood, 358 
Purchase of land for Sniall-pox hospital, 300 
Contraet for publishing the olUeial report, 370 
Site for new Court House, 377 

Salaries of Constables at Municipal District Courts, 409 
Watering Warren Street, Koxbury, 414 
Ventilation of City Hall, 435 

Sale of City's lani'l on Pleasant and Eliot Streets, 436 
Estalilisliing publie urinals, 449 
Watering I'ark Square, 450, 450 
Defective conductors on buildings, 453 
Barnum's Hippodrome, 455 
Cleaning and painting Public Library, 462 
Curbstone for Ti'emout-street mall, 402 
Printing Solicitor's Report semi-annually, 463 
Petition of Middlesex K. Co. to use Metropolitan R. tracks, 

472 
Removing gravel from Long Island, 492 
Enforcement of the Grade Law, 493 
The vacation, 494 
Ci'Uars below grade, 495, 584 
Allowing fast riding, 498 
Home for the Poor, 501, 507, 515 
Middlesex Railroad in State Street, 526 
Wood pavements in Devonshire Street, 528 
Extension of Lenox Street, 529 
Municipal Court Room, East Boston, 530 
Surety to Treasurer's Bond, 541 
Metropolitan use of Highland Railroad track, 554 
Number of horse-cars in streets, 550 
Fast driving, 501, Oil 
Walcott's Hotel, 502, 582 
Evening Schools, 564 
Paving city passageways, 570, 586 
Public Park, 596 

Pumping engines at Lake Cochituate, 598 
Licensing i)iunibers, 010 
Charles River water sujjply, 628 
Blockades on Tremont Street, 017, 693 
Wideinng School Street, 688 

Gen. Butler's otter of Sudbury River, 6.30, 691 
Boston Water Power Co. and Back Bay streets, 695 
Appleton Temi>oi'ary Home, 776 

Citizen's Gaslight Co., 744, 750 

The Law Department, 748 

East Cambridge omnibus line, 748 

Faneuil Hall sidewalk, 753 
Harris (.Vlderman) rejiiarks : on 

Payment for badges for Charlestown Police, 47 

Railroad crossings in East Boston, 74 

Salaries of officers in Charlestown Court, 90 

Salaries of city officers, 91, 93, 1.54 

Hiring No. 30 Pembcrton Square, 118 

Death of Hon. Charles Sumner, 127 

Appropriation Bill, 107, 180, 189 

A\'ater street extension, 168 

Boundary between Boston and Brookline, 179 

Watering stn^ets, 192 

Betterment assessed on Pai-ker-Memori.al Meeting-house, 204 

Consolidation of Water Boards, 213 

Elevator in City Hall, 222 

Dummy engine on Union Freight Railway track, 2'25 

I'ublic grounds, Charlestown, 226 

Allowance for Decoration Day, 265, 271 

A City Architect, 283 

Watershed of Mystic Lake, 284 

Hampden Street District, 300 

Contraet with Dorchester Gaslight Co., 302 

Common and Public Grounds, 305 

Protection of police uniforms at tires, 322 

J. W. Bartlett's patent torch, 335 

Site for new Court House, 377 

Salaries of constables at Municipal District Courts, 408 

Watering Warren street, Roxbury, 414 

Contract to water Park Square, 456 

Erection of fountain in Independence Sq., 500 

Extension of Lenox Street, 529 

Naming Post Gffice Square, 740 

East Cambridge omnibus line, 748 
Harlior — 

Discussion on rescinding license for removing gi-avel from 
Long Island, 492 

Order passed to rescind license to remove gravel from Long 
Island, -,9? * 



Order passed to rescind license to F. J. & J. L. Ward to 
remove gravel, 513 

Order pas.sed to pay assessment for tide water displaced, 531 

Report ac-cepted, leave to withdraw on petition for leave to 
remove gravel, 5U8 
Health, Hoard of — 

Connnunication relating to Marcella Street hospital, 213 

Conununication relating to location of puldii: urinals, 233; 
discussion, 448; order i)assed for establishing, 403 

Communication in response to order relating to public uri- 
nals, 47 1 

Annual report, 484 

Communication on sewerage system, 7.39 
Health Department — 

Superintendent authorized to purch.ase supplies, 20 

Contracts autliorized for removal of house ott'.d, 203 
Report and order relating to steam whistles on railroads, 317 

Ordinance passed relating to removal of manure, 300 

Prison carriage authorized, 416 
Highland Street i;ailwav — 

Petition for double track on Blue-IIill avenue, 100 

Hearing on petition for location of tracks on Hlue-Ilill 
Avenue, and use of tracks of Metropolitan R., lOJ 

Hearing on petitions for locating in Court fctrcet, Cornhill 
ana Blue-Hill .\ venue, 190 

Report and orders on location in Blue-Hill Avenue, etc., 223 

'1 bird location (City Doc. 41) granted, 237 

Order passed for connecting ear-huuses on Shawmut Avenue 
ami Warren Street, 27 > 

Third location accejited, 206 

Location granted Aug. od, accepted, 482 

Order passed authoriziug use of tracks of Metropolitan R. 
Co., 473 
Horse Railway System — 

Order passed for Committee on Paving to investigate Rail- 
way system, 191 
Home for the Poor — see I'ublic Institutions. 
Hospitals — see City Hospital, also Small-jjox. 

Inspector of Buildings — see Buildings. 

Jail — see County of Suffolk. 

King Kalakaua — 

Orders passed for reception, 707 

Lamp Department — 

Annual report of Superintendent, 8 
Superintendent authorized to make purchases, 27 
Order passed to light lamps on ground of Hunker Hill Mon- 
ument Association, from May 1 to Oct. 1, 241 
Discussion on, and order passed authorizing contract with 

Dorclie.ster Gaslight Co., 302 
Order passed authorizing contract with Jamaica Plain Gas- 
light Co., 303 
Order passed for transfer of land on .Albany Street from 

Sewer Department to Lamp Department, 321 
Discussion on, and order passed to pay J. W. Bartlett $2,500 

for use of patent torch, 335 
Order passed for erection of repair shop, 343 
Superintendent authorized to make necessary repairs, 402 

" " to lay pipe and locate additional 

lamps on Common, 402 
Order passed relating to repair shop, etc., 462 
Employes antliorized at repair shop, 531 
Law Department — 

Mayor authorized to draw for payment of executions or 

judgements against city, 9 
Order passed in regard to semi-annual reports, 66 
Report inexpedient to dispense with Solicitor's reports, ac- 
cepted, 1U2 
Report relating to Solicitor's reports recommitted, 13 < 
Order relating to Dorchester, set of M<ass. Ueports, 227, 237 
Order passed providing additional assistance to City Solici- 
tor, '237 
Semi-aunual report of City Solicitor (ordered to be printed), 

450 
City Solicitor — discussion on printing semi-aimual report 

and refusal to reconsider, -103 
Report on additional assistance, 716 

Discussion on ordinance rehiting to Assistant Solicitors, 736 
Discussion and amendment of ordinance passed, 74> 
Law Library (.--ocial) — 

Report action inexpedient, 39 
Order passed to allow § 1,000 to proprietors, 751 
Legislative matters — 

Order relating to p.ayment of specified bills, barred by statue, 
479 
Licenses — 

Discussion on Barnum's Hippodrome, 454 
Hearing on Walcott's Hotel, .i41 
Discussion on Walcott's Hotel, 562, 582 
Report accepted, leave to withdraw, 582 
Lighters — see Ballast Lighters. 
Loans — 

§100,000 additional for Devonshire Street extension, 48, 64, 72 
!f20i),000 additional for Washington Street extension, 60, 89 
§1,020,000 for Burnt District Loan, S'.i, 151 



INDEX TO PROCEEDIXGS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



9 



$200,000 authorized for JSTortliampton Street District, 171 
$4,0UU,00U temporary loan in anticipation of taxes, ol8 
$194,000 for Beach btrect improvement, 4U8 
$57,000 additional to Street Improvement Loan, Beach 
Street, 44>i 

Magazine Street District — see Svfett Street District. 
Mayor — Order passed for printing inaugural Address, 8 
Disposition of Topics iu Inaugural Address, 20 
Valedictory Address, 767 
Mayor — Communications from, viz. : 
Relating to projecting signs, 7 
Relating to dangerous raih'oad crossings, 15 
Relating to assessment on Charlestown for tide-water dis- 
placed, 28 
Relating to death of Hon. Charles Sumner, 125 
Relating to portrait of Hon. Charles Sumner, 164 
Relating to l)oundary between Boston and Broolsline, 179 
Donation to City Hospital, 251 
Relating to condition of Kaneuil Hall, 434 
Relating to I'arlicr Street Sewer nuisance, 497 
Relating to decease of ex-mayor Shurtlett", 572 
Markets — 

Quarterly reports Superintendent Fancuil Hall Market, 36, 

2J2, 471 
Order relating to new leases, 102, 115 

Order passed authorizing assistant to Superintendent, 119 
Report accepted and referred, relating to paving sidewalk 

front of i-'aneuil Hall, 572 
Reconsideration moved, and laid on table, relating to paving 

front ofKaneuil Hall, 648 
Mass. Charitable Mechanic Association — 

Petition referred for use of Faneuil Hall for Twelfth Exhibi- 
tion, 36 
Use of Kancuil Hall granted and leave to erect temporary 

building over Merchants' row, 239 
Allowed to erect staircase to Kaneuil Hall, 491 
Metropolitan K. 1{. Co. — 

I'euiiou from residents in vicinity, relating to stable on Back 

liay, 14J 
Order "passed permitting maintenance of stable on Marl- 

borougli Street till .May 1, 173 
Hearing on petition to use tracks of Higliland St. It., 190 
Order pa.ssed to pave ti-acks on Union Street, 263 
Order pas-ed to remove tracks from Waltliam Street, 320 
Hearing on track on W'asliington Street extension, 351 
Order passed for location in Wasliington Street between 

Cornliill and Dock Scjuare, 38j 
Hearing on petition for location of second track in Wa-hing- 

ton Street, 426 
Acceptance of location through Washington Str.'ct to Ilay- 

niarket Square, 430 
Order passed to discontinue running cars thro\igh Court 

Street, 401 
Locations to Hay market Square revoked, 491 
Turnout on Wasliington, between Kingsbury and Thornton 

Streets, allowed, 491 
Permitted to rnn certam cars in Court Street, 506 
Location accepted, 513 

Discussion on, and report accepted, leave to wit'idr.aw, rela- 
tive to use of Highland trade, 5.53 
Order of notice relative to removal of tracks in Kast Boston, 

556 
Hearing on additional tracks on Wasliington and other 

Streets, 63'J 
Rei)ort accepted, leave to withdraw, on Columbus Avenue 

location, 642 
Rcijort and discussion on additional tracks in \\"asl.i.;glon 

Street, 645 
Discussion on double tracks on Washington Street, an;l re- 

commital, 649 
Second reijort on double tracks in Washington --tr e' , li .5 
Discussion on, and order rejected for double railroad tra>ks 

on Washington Street, 682 
Order passed granting additional location on Washington 

Street, from Bartlett Street to School Stree:, \\'e.--t Kox- 

bury, 6S7 
Location accepted, 739 
Middlesex K. Co. — 

Heai'ing on petition for leave to use tracks of Metropolitan 

R. R., 105 
Hearing on petition to run cars to Boylston Street, 190 
Authorized lo lay temporary tracks on Washington, State, 

Devonshire Street and Dock Square, 251 
Order passed to pave tracks in Union Street, 2 i3 
Location accepted in Wasliington, State and Devonshire 

Streets, 301 
Hearing on track on Washington Street extension, 351 
Order passed for location In Washington .■^lreet, between 

Cornhill and Dock Square, 389 
Location on Washington Street extension accepted, 434 
Location granted .August 3d accepted, 482 
Discussion on, and order passed authorizing Middlesex R. 

Co. to use circuits, 472 
Locations to Haymarket Square revoked, 491 
Temporary track on Washington and Devonshire Streets 

revoked, 491 



Report discussed, and accepted, permitting tracks to remain 

in State Street, 526 
Order of notice to pave Warren Avenue, from Warren 

Bridge to City Square, 527 
Motion to reconsider vote permitting track to remain in State 

and Devonshire Streets, laid on table, 546 
Hearing on tracks in Haymarket Square, ;:41 
Militia — 

Co. D, First Bat. Cav., $1,200 for repairs on armory, 37 
Co. I, Ninth Keg. Int., $383.10 for repairs on armory, 37 
First Bat. Light Art., $250 for repairs on headquarters, 3" 
Co. I, Ninth l{eg., order passed to reimburse $89.40 taxes 

paid on armory, 66 
Co. F, First Reg., $25 on account of rent, 66 
Co. K, First Reg. Inf., armory approved, .'<5 

" " $l,uuO for rent of armory, 92 

Co. G-, Ninth Reg., $700 per annum, for rent of armory, 101 
Co. C, First Bat. Cav., $800 per annum, for rent of armory, 

101 
First Bat. Inf., $450 per annum, for rent of headquarters 

(Boylston Hall), 102 
Co. A, First Bat. Inf., Concord Hall, approved for armory, 

102 
Co. D, First Bat. Inf., order passed to discontinue rent in 

Minot Hall, and $1,000 per annum allowed for rent, and 

$500 for furnishing armory cor. Harvard and Washing- 
ton Streets, 150 
Co. D, Fifth Inf., $690 per annum, for rent of armory, 1.50 
Co. A, First Bat. Inf., rent in Minot Hall discontinued, and 

$1,000 per annum allowed for rent in Concord Hall, 150 
Co. 1), First Bat. Inf., armory approved, 153 
First Co. Cadets, repairs of armory authorized, 153 
First Bat. Light Art., $4-30 per annum, for rent of armory, 

170 
order passed for repairs of armory on Maverick Street, 

170 
Co. K, Ninth Reg., i-cnt of armory in Third Street discon- 
tinued, and .$8 )0 rent, and $2.)U for furnishing armory in 

Kroadway allowed, 2.j2 
Co. C, First Bat. (.'av., $500 to fit up armory, cor. High and 

I'earl Streets, Charlestown, 252 
Co. K, NintU Inf., .armory approved, 263 
Co. F, First Reg. Inf., $1)0 to furnish armory, 264 
Discussion on, and order jiassed to take old High School 

Building, cor. of Dorchester Avenue and Gibson Street, 

and fit up for armory for Co. I, First Reg., and Co. C. 

Fourth Bat. Inf., 2i>J 
Concurrence in amendment to order for repairing old High 

School Building for armory, 314 
Co. C First Heg. inf., order passed for discontinuance of 

rent of armory, 342 
approval of armory cor. of Gibson Street, and Dorches- 
ter Avenue, 342 
Fifth Reg. Inf., $300 per annum, rent for headquarters, S^'O 
Co. G, JNiuth Reg. Inf., $225 to fit up and furnish armory, 

300 
Co. H, Fifth Reg. Inf., $225 to fit up and furnish armory, 

390 
Repair of armory building, E. B., authorized, 427 
Co. D, Fifth Inf., $2::5 on ai-mory, ^4S 
Co. D, Fourth Bat. Inf., $100 additional on armory, 448 
Co. C, Fourth Bat. Inf., $40 for temporary u.~e of room, 448 
report on .armory .at Upham's Corner, leave to withdraw 

accepted, 448 
Co. li, Fiftli Inf., $50 for rep.aii-s of armoiy, 471 
Co. A, First Art., report accepted, inexpedient to provide 

new armory, 52 J 
Co. I, First Inf., allowed $500 for repairs, 540 
Co. A, Fourth Bat., allowed $500 for repairs, 540 
Co. B, First Inf., allowed $00U for repairs, 540 
Co. H, Ninth Inf., allowed $6'I0 for repairs, 540 
Co. B, Ninth Inf., allowed $^00 for repairs, 540 
Discussion on repairs of armoi'ies, 540 
Report accepted inexpedient to procure use of drill-room of 

Inst, of technology, 56^) 
Co. I, First Keg. inf., armory approved, 569 
Co. A, Second Bat. inf., or<ler passed to furnish .armory, 501 

order passed to pay for rent of armory, 56J 

order passed to discontinue rent of old armory, and ailow 

$900 for rent of new, 569 
Second Bat. Inf., order passed to pay 300 per annum for rent 

of headquarters, 509 
Second Bat. Inf., headquarters approved, 615 
Co. A, Second liat. Inf., armory apjirovod, 615 
First Bat. Cav., headquarters discontinued, and $4.50 per 

annum allowed for new lira Iquarters, Boylston Hr.ll, iii6 
Report accepted, leave to withdraw on ticadquarlers for 

Fourth liat. Inf., 710 
Co. B, Ninth Keg. Inf., order passed to repair and fit up 

armory, 710 
First Bat. Cav., headquarters approved, 710 
Co. A, First Keg. Inf., $2r5 for rent, 736 
Co. C, Fourth Bat. Inf., armory established, 743 
Milk — Inspector of, order to place under direction of Board of 

Health, 72 
Order passed to place Inspector under direction of Board of 

Health, 182 



10 



INDEX TO J'lJOCEEDINGS OF UOAIJI) OF ALDEHMEN. 



Or^U'r passed to rt'consiJer placing Inspector under Board of 

lli':iUli, and lai I on table, l.)4 
Or.li r i);i»8ed for oflice outside of City Hall, for Inspector, 

OrdiT placing Inspector under l?oard of Health indefinitely 
postponed, 3i)J 

Inspector of, authorized to emiiloy assistant, 624 
Minor< — 

Uoar 1 of Aldermen authorized to malce rules, etc., 9 

Regulations adopted for licensiug, ID 
Mount Hope — Si e Cemeti-ries. 
Muiiicipal I'ourts — see County of Suffolk. 
Munii'ipul liegistir — 

Order pas.-('d fur isreparation, 8 
M useuin of Anatomy — 

Kemonstranue of Soe. Natural Tlistorv, 72 

liemonstraiiee of 15oston <oc. of Me<lical .Science, 92 

llemonstranees of Suffolk District Medical !?o:;icty and 
Young Men's Christian Association aud Young Men's 
t:hristian L'lnon, lul 

Comniuiucation Iroin Jourdain & Co., 101 

l;epi)rt of Committee on Licenses, lul 

UeniDiistrance-i of Ko.xbury isociety for Medical Improve- 
ment, and others, 114 

Discussion aud orders passed, 121 
Mufic — 

Discu'ssion and non-concurrence on open-air concerts, 3")2 
Mystic Water Works — see Water. 

Northampton St. District — 

Owners and occupants notified to raise buildings and re- 
move obstacles, 92 

Notice to owners relating to contracts, 102 

Order i)-.issed autliorizing contract for filling, 115 

Request lor loan of $200,1)00, 1.51 

Order passed to contract for filling, 181 

Closing of streets, appointment of superintendent and watch- 
men, and laying railroad tracks, authorized, 103 

Order p:issed authorizing expenditures, 210 

Order passed autliorizing contract for raising buildings, etc., 
210 

Order passed for streets to be closed, 031 

Old Colony Railroad — 

Order on petition of Edmund J. Baker and others, 203 

Discussion on, and order passed for use of Dummy engine 
on Cnion Freight R. R. track, 224. 

Order of notice to erect gates on Melville Ave., Mather, and 
Codman Sts., 4 a 

Report, leave to withdraw, on petition to lay track across 
Foundry St., 7(37 
Ordinances — • 

Order passed to jjrint Digest, 435 

Report acjcpted itiexpe.iient to remove restrictions on dis- 
charge of Firearms, 530 
Overseers of I'oor — 

Quarterly report, 47, 232, 483, Gil 

(Jrder relating to Sears' Donation, 289, 301 

Notice of vacancy, 324 

Annual report, 387 

Election to till vacancy, 41G, 427 
Omnibuses — 

Line authorized from Hartford and Erie Depot to Dart- 
mouth St., 528 

Report of routes between East Cambridge and Boston, 743 

Oraer passed establishing route for East Cambridge aud 
Boston Omnibus line, 748 

Paddock Elms — see Streets, Tremout St. 
I'aving (see also Streets) — 

Order passed to purchase Blake's stone-crusher, 456 

( irder passed to hire Rogers' Wharf, 6S7 
Peters (Alderman) — remarks: on 

Wilson's Hotel, Ward 19, 20, 40 

Smith's Riding School, 31 

Payment for badges for police in Charlestown, 47 

The Park question, 70 

Railroad crossings in East Boston, 73 

Removal of Paddock Elms, 76 

Salaries of officers in Cliarlestown Court, 90 

Salaries of city officers, 95, 150, 205, 215 

Running ferry tolls, 120 

Consolidation of Water Boards, 213, 372, 395, 400 

Naming Curtis Hall, 121 

Jourdain's Museum of Anatomy, 121 

Railway Station at Chestnut-IIill Reservoir, 136 

IMttropolitan R. R. Station on Back Bay, 138 

Appropriation Bill, 107 

Act to legalize Normal School, 172 

Water St. widening, 181 

Removal of office of Milk Inspector, 182, 194 

Horse Railway System, 192 

Watering streets, 193 

Elevator in City Hall, 221 

Salaries of Registrars of Voters, 224, 239, 241 

Dummy engine on Uiuon Freight Railway track, 225 

Expenditures for Common and Public Grounds, 226 



Additional Appropriation for printing proceedings of City 

Council, 227 

Allowance for Decoration Day, 2.37, 265, 271 

A^^is^ance to Supt. Dover St. Bridge, 254 

AV.iod pavement in Kilby St., 207, 287 

A <'itv -\rcliiteet, 2S2 

Water-shed of Mystic Lake, 285 

Appropriation for Paving Kilby St., 287 

Taking old High School-hous'e, cor. Dorchester Av. and 
Gibson St., for armory, 289 

Hampden St. District, 300 

Contract with Dorchester Ga.slight Co., 302 

Intending name of Dudley St. through Stoughton St., 313 

Amount for Fourth .July, 314 

Pnrch.-iso of land fur Small-pox hospital, 317, 360 

Addition.al copies of Sumner ilemorial, 321 

.T. W. Hartlett's patent torch, 335 

Widening Shawmut Ave. between Dudley .and Guild Sts., 336 

Appointing physicians to examine water qualities, 338 

Interest on unpaid taxes, 338 

Order to pay .S. B. Heustis for extra service, 340 

Order to pay expenses Com. on S. B. Flats, 341 

Free o])en-air concerts, 352 

Order to pave Water St. with wood, 358 

Contract for publishing the official report, 370 

Site for new Court House, 377 

Taking Beach St. Presbyterian Church, 378 

Disposal of Boston Post estate, 379 

Allowing Police officers free passes over ferries, 389 

Charging for licenses to pawnbrokers, etc., 390 

Watering Warren St., Roxbury, 414 

Rate of interest on unpaid taxes, 427 

Erection of Grammar School-house, Charlestown, 428 

Ventilation of City Hall, 435 

Sale of City's land on I'leasant and Eliot Sts., 436 

Establishing public urinals, 448 

Watering Park Sq., 450, 456 

L'sing wood pavement on Gold and Silver Sts., 453 

liarnum's Hipjiodrome, 455 

Cleaning aiul Painting Public Library Building, 461 

I'rinting Solicitor's report, semi-aimually, 403 

Petition of Middlesex R. Co. to use Metropolitan R. tracks, 
473 

Home for the Poor, 474, 501, 509, 515, 580 

The vacation, 494 

Cellars below grade, 494, 584 

Allowing fast riding, 400 

Middlesex Railroad in St.ate St., 526 

Wood pavements in Devonshire St., 499, 527 

Municipal Court Room, East Boston, 530 

Repairs of Armories, 540, 597 

Surety to Treasurer's Bond, 541 

Metr(jpolitan use of Highland Railroad track, 553 

I'aving city passageways, 570, 586 

Bridge on Asliland St., 578 

Walcott's Hotel, 582 

I'ublic Park, 605 

Vacancies in Water Board, 599 

TJcensing Plumbers, 610 

Cluu les River Water Supply, 628 

General Butler's offer of Sudbury river, 030 

Alleged fraud's in Sudbury scheme, 641 

I'aving in front of Faneuil Hall, 648 

Horse-car blockade, 640, 649, 683, 692 

Emploj'ment for the I'oor, 662 

limiting approach of cars, 677 

Widening School St., OSS 

Soup for the Poor, OSS, 717 

Boston Water Power Co., and Back Bay Streets, 695, 712 

ICxeeeding appropriations, 709 

Nautical School, 712 

Extension of Swett St., 717 

Water Supply f<n- Wards 17 and 19, 715 

The Law Department, 727 

Naming Post Office Square, 740 

Citizens' Gaslight Co., 744, 750 
Philadelphia — 

Reception of delegation from, 334 
Police — 

(.Quarterly reports of Chief, 8, 192, 410, 568 

Order pa'ssed to pay officers iu West Roxburj', Brighton, and 
CharU'stown, 8 

Annual report of Chief, 15 

Order passed fixing maximum number, 19 

Order passed t\>r extension of poliec-telegraph system to 
West Roxbnry, (Charlestown, and Brigliton, 19 

Chief authorized to purchase suj)plies aud make repairs, 30 
Petition for Harbor Police-boat, 46 
Report rtlating to mounted police, 63 

Order passed to consider expediency of tr.ansferring fire- 
boat to police, and procuring new fire-boat, 120 
Order passed authorizing mounted police, 2 9 
Order passed to establish telegraphic communication be- 
tween Central Police Office and station at West Roxbury, 
Brighton and So. Boston, 209 
Order jjassed to luridsh Stations Twelve, Thirteen and 
Fourteen, 226 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



11 



Maximum number of Liputonaiits and Sergeants fixe'l, 2-H 
( r.'er relating to I'oliee-boat indefinitely po.stponoil, ^41 
Order passed to consider expediency of providing tire-coats, 

Orler passed authorizing Chief to suspend members, o34 
Discussion on order passed to pay S. B. Ilcustis for extra 

service, 340 
Order passed for construction of steamboat for use of police, 

3fi2 
Order passed for Chief to make repairs on station-houses, 

etc., 389 
OfScers for police-boat appointed, 5S5 
Order passed to contract for coal for police-boat, 607 
Report of police-boat regulations, bl2 
Kules and regulations for poliee-boat established, 622 
Poor — see Overseers of Poor; Soup for I'oor; Employment for 

I'oor. 
Power. (.Mdrrman) — Remarks : on 
The I'aik question, 17. H8 
■Wilson's Hotel, Ward 19, 20, 40 
Smith's Hiding Scliool, 31, 38, 50, 55. 303 
Printing extra copies of report on Water Supply, 4^, 54 
liailway crossing in Hast IJoston, 74 
Kemovid of Paddock Kims, 74, 83 
License for plumbers, 82 
Salaries of oflicers in Charlestown Court. 90 
Salaries of city officers, 91, 93, 116, 153, 205 
The water supply, 104 
.lonrdain's Museum of Anatomj', 122 
Death (if lion. Clias Snmiier. r27 
Kailwiiy st.-ition at Cliestnut ilill Reservoir, 133 
Sale of Fort Ilill property, 150 
Appropriation Bill, li)6. ISO 
Reward relating to Katie Mary Cnrran, 171 
Act to legalize Normal School, 171. 194 
Removal of office of Milk Inspector from City Hall, 182, 194 

362 
Watering streets, 192 
Klevator in City Hall, 115, 221 
Salaries of Registrars of Voters, 224, 240, 242 
Dummy engine on Uni )n Freight Railw.ay track, 224 
Additional approijriation for ijrintiug ijroceedings of City 

Council, 227 
Assistance to Supt. Dover St. Bridge, 254, 263 
Appropriation for Decoration Day, 2ri5, 270 
\\ ood pavement in Kilby St., 207, 2S7 
Charge and disposal of city publications, 270 
A City A rchitect, 283 
Watershed of Mystic Lake, 284 
Printing l,ii{io extra Sumner Memorial, 300 
Hampleii St. District, 3 JO 
Contract with Dorchester Gaslight Co., 303 
Extending name of Dudley St. through Stoughton St., 313 
Allowance for Fourth -luly, 314 
Purchase of land for Small-pox hospital, ."17, 360 
Additional copies of Sumner Memorial, 321 
Appointment of engineers to examine water supply, 316 
Apijointment of phj'siciaus to examine water qualities, 3''!8, 

Interest on unpaid taxes, 38S 

Order to pay expenses of Com. on S. B. Flats, 341 

Free open-air concerts, 332 

Order to pave Water St. with wood, .358 

Contract for publishing the oflicial report, 370 

bite for new (,'ourt House, 376 

Disposal of Boston Post estate, 379 

Charging for licenses to pawnbrokers, etc., 330 

Consolidation of Water Boards, 397 

Watering Warren St., Roxbury, 414 

Expenditures for Common and Public Grounds, 410 

l{ate of interest on unpaid taxes, 427 

Erection of Grammar School-house, Charlestown, 4;9 

Ventilation of City Hall, 43'), 447 

Sale ol city's land on I'leasant and Eliot Sts., 436 

Establishing Public Urinals, 44S 

Salaries of officers in district courts, 451 

Using wood pavement on Gold and Silver Sts., 433 

Watering Park Square, 450, 4')6 

Curbstone lor Ti-emont-street Mall, 462 

Petition of Middlesex 11. Co. to use Metropolitan R. tr.acks, 

473 
Petition of Highland R. Co. to use Metropolitan R. tracks, 

473 
Home for the Poor, 474, 502, 506, 575, 580 
Removing gravel from Long Island, 492 
Enforcement of the Grade Law, 493, 585 
The vacation, 494 

Erection of fountain in Independence Square, 500, 510 
Middlesex Railroad in State Street, 526 
Wood p.avements in Devonshire Street, 527 
Municipal Court Room, East Boston, 530 
Metropolitan use of Highland Railroad track, 553 
Paving city passageways, 570, 586 
Cellar^ below grade, 585 
Public I'ark, 595 
Vacancies in Water Board, .599 
Evening drawing scliool in East Boston, 600, 614 
Licensing plumbers, 610 



Fast driving, 611 

Furnisliing court rooms, 613 

Alleged frauds in Sudbury scheme, 641 

I'aving in front of Faneuil Hall, 648 

Double tracks in Washington Street, 646, 649, 633 

Soup for the Poor, 062, 078. 

Employment for the Poor, 662 

Drake's History of Boston, 6'JO 

Boston Water Power Co. and Back Bay streets, 697, 712 

Nautical School, 713 

Water Supply for W.ards 17 and 19, 715 

Extension of Swett Street, 721 

The Law Department, 737, 749 

Compensation for clerical services, 741 

Citizens' Gaslight Co., 743, 750 

Faneuil Hall Sidewalk, 751 
Prescott (Aldermen) — Remarks: on 

Smith's Rilling School, 51, .304 

Widening of Atlantic Avenue, 65 

The Park question, 70 

Removal of Paddock Elms, 74 

License for plumbers, 82 

Changing name of jiart of Clarendon Street, 85 

Salaries of officers of Charlestown court, 90 

Salaries of city officers, 91, 93, 116, 153, 205, 215 

Jourdain's Museum of Anatomy, 122 

Death of Hon. Charles Sumner, 126 

Metropolitan R. R. Stable on Back Bay, 139 

Appro])riation Bill, 106, 179 

Act to legalize Normal School, 171, 194, 213 

Removal of office of Milk Inspector, 182, 194, 2S8, 362 

Consolidation of Water Boards, 213, 391, 400 

Salaries of Registrars of Voters, 224, 2.39, 241 

Dummy engine on Union Freight Railway track, 225 

A City Architect, 283 

License to Benjamin Jones to sprinkle Park Square, 450 

Allowance for Fourth July, 314 

Purchase of land for Small-pox hospital, 317 

Additional copies of the Sumner Memorial, 322 

Interest on unpaid taxes, 338 

Order to pay S. B. Heustis for extra service, 340 

Free open-air concerts, 352 

Site for new Court House, 377 

Taking Beach Street Presbyterian Church, 378 

Disposal of Boston Post estate, 379 

Erection of Grammar Scliool-house, Charlestown, 429 

Sale of City's land on Pleasant and Eliot Streets, 436 

License to Benjamin Jones to sprinkle Park Square, 450 

Salaries of officers in district courts, 451 

Standi^ipes in public buildings, 453 

Barnum's Hippodrome, 455 

Home for. the Poor, 457, 475, 503, .506, 580 

Printing Solicitor's Report, semi-annually, 463 

Petition of Middlesex R. Co. to use Metropolitan R. tracks, 
473 

Metropolitan use of Highland Railroad track, 554 

Fast driving, 561, 611 

Evetiing Schools, 503 

Paving citv passagewaj's, 570, 5S3 

Walcott's Hotel, 582 

Evening drawing school in E. Boston, 600, 614 

Licensing plumbers, 610 

Paving in front of Faneuil Hall, 648 

Widening School Street, 6S8 

Horse-car blockades, 649, 682, 693 

Exceeding .appropriations, 709 

Nautical School, 712 

Extension of Swett Street, 722 

The L.aw Department, 737, 749 

Citizens' Gaslight Co., 744 

Faneuil Hall sidewalk, 751 
Printing - (sec also City Publications) — 

Aimual reports authorized in print, 2 

Discussion on printing additional copies of Water report 
(Doc. 29, 18;.S), 49 

Order for l,uuo extra Sumner Xfemorial rejected, 300; dis- 
cussion on reconsider.ation, 321 

Report accepted, leave to withdraw on petition of Porter & 
Coates, I'hiladelphia, 615 
Probate —see County of Sutfolk. 
Public Baths — 

Order p.assed to repair and maintain free public bathing- 
houses, 23J 

Order passed to hire land and flats on L St., South Boston, 
for batli-house, 303 

Act authorizing baths accepted, 736 

Annual report, 742 
Public Huildingi —(sec also I'uhlic Library) — 

Cit}' Hall, order passed for repairs, 29 

report and order passed ]elating to public ofBccs, 35 

discussion on elevators, 115 

order passed relating to remov.al of ofDcc of Sealers of 

Weights and Measures, 181 

discussion, and order passed for construction of ele- 
vator, 221 

amendment of order relating to appropriation for ele- 
vator, 25) 

discussion on ventilation, 435 



12 



INDEX TO I'KOCEEDINGS OF JJOARI) OF ALDEUMEX, 



PuTjlic lUiildings, — repairs authorize ', 437 

(IImc-uhbIoii on ventilation, and recomniittal with Instruc- 
tions, -147 

cliange of location of oflices autliorizcH, 401 

repairs and changes in heating Mi>i)ar:itu8 authorized, 

4t)l 

order passed to provide stoam-punip, OOO. 585 

order passed assigning rooms for Committee on Paving, 

Conimittee and buperintendciit of Irinting, and I'arli 
Commissioners, .jOU 

Faneuil Hall, order passed for new series of regulations, 8 

>.'e\v rules and regulations adopted, :jU 

report relating to religious services on Sundays, 118 

repairs atitli(iriz<'d, -1^4 

Quarterly report of Superintendent, SOC 

Order passed "relating to leasing Town IJall, West Roxbury, 9 

Annual report of .SuiJerintendent, 10 

Wilson's llotel. Ward l!i, discussion on sale of, and order 
passed to notify tenant to vacate, 20, 4U 

Order passed to consider expediency of employing perma- 
nent arciiitect, 84 

Report and order passed for leasing No. 3D Pemberton Sq., 
118 

Order passed to name the Town Hall in West Roxbury, 
Curtis Hall, 121 

Report relating to hiring Xo. 30 Pemberton Sq. recommitted, 
13(3 

Order ijassed for fitting up Town Hall, Brighton, for Police 
Station, 1;')0 

Report and order passed to hire No. 30 Pemberton Sq., 163 

Oriler passed for alterations in 3J l'eml)erton Sq., 2S'.i 

lloolc and Ladder House No. 4, order passed to grade yard 
and pave sidewallv, 417 

Order passed for sale of buildings 11 and 37 Washington 
Sq., 417 

Order passed to excavate below grade cellar of engine-house, 
corner of Bristol St. and Harrison Ave., 452 

Order passed relative to stand-pipes, 4)3 

Brand) oitice of City Surveyor authorized in old Washington 
School-house, 4(il 

Old City Stables, Highlands, sale by auction authorized, 461 

30 Pemberton Sq., order jiassed for j)ainting and furnishing, 
471 

Municipal Court, So. Boston, report and order passed author- 
izing $l,MUO additional for fitting up and furnishing 
rooms, 491 

No. 30 Pemberton Sq., Committteo authorized to employ 
assistance, 4i)l 

Report recommitted with instructions relating to temporary 
place for insane, &U0 

Report relating to temporarj' care of insane, 545 

Order passed to fit up room in court-house, for temporary 
care of insane, 56J 

Order passed authorizing voting places for Wards 20, 21 and 
22, 6.i(i 

Report accepted, leave to withdraw on petition for ward- 
rooms, o.j6 

Order passed to sell old engine-house and lot on Centre St., 
Ward 17, 507 

Order passed to establish ward-rooms in Charlestown, 56S 

Report accepted relating to smoking in ward-rooms, 598 

Orjer passed to sell buildings on Koxbnry and King Sts., 
613 
Public Institutions — 

lirder passed in regard to Almshouse in Charlestown, 20 

Home for the I'oor — order passed for directors to take charge 
of Austin l""arm, 118 

communications i'rom Directors, transmitting plans, 

etc., 194 

discussion on, 457, 474, 501 

specially assigned to August 18, 477 

discussion on, and orders passed, 506 

communication from Directors, discussion and recom- 
mittal, with directions, olo 

report from Directors, and discussion. 579 

Cora, from Directors relating to Water Supply at House of 
Correction, and order passed, 256 

Annual report of Directors, 380 
Public Lands — 

Amuial report of Superintendent, 16 

Keport on extension of Swett St., ;J0 

Poor House Farm, Ward 19, placed in charge of Com. on 
Public Lands, 40 

Order passed to place lands and buildings in charge of Com. 
on Public Lands, 63 

Report accepted (leave to withdraw) on petition relating to 
wharf on Medford St., 102 

Order passed tov lilliiig land on Canal St. and rear of Har- 
vard Cemetery, 119 

Order ])assed relating to selling land to Mass. Char. Me- 
chanic Asso., I2.i 

Discussion on Hallway Station at ChestnntHill Reservoir, 136 

Amendment concurred in relating to sale to Mass. Char. 
Mec. Asso., 136 

Order passed for sale of land within Fort Hill Dist., 139 

Fort Hill District, order amended relating to sale, 150 

Discussion on, and ordi'r passed relating to sale by public 
auction of city lands on Pleasant and Kliot St., 436 



Order passed to examine titles to public property in Brighton, 

540 
Order passed relative to lot of land on corner of Albany and 

( oneord Sts., 741 
Public; Library — lirder passed for enlargement of building, 2-52 
Charlestown City Hall, antliorized for a Branch Liljrary, 264 
Discussion on and order passed to clean and paint, ^61 
urder passed to provide suitable accommodations in Ward 

It), for Dorchester branch of Public Liljrary, 472 
Annual report, 497 
Connnunieations from President, and J. Huntington Wol- 

eott, 497 
Order passed to fit up police station for Dorchester branch 

library, .)59 
Order passed in new draft to connect standpipe with high 

service, 59i} 
Order jjassed to pay salary of late Wm. A. Wheeler to Feb. 

1st, 599 
Report accepted, inexpedient to act on " Wolcott Estate," 715 
Order passed to hire rooms for S. B. Branch, 742 
Public Park — Keport and discussion, 17 
Diseus.sion and votes, 07 
Commissioners elected, 102, 115 
Commissioners at large appointed, 149 
Discussion on petitioning, 594 

Registrars of Voters — 

Act and order relating to, 140 

Act accepted, 1.50 

Order passed allowing S500 for clerical service, 513 
Registry of Deeds — see County of Sutt'olk. 
Rewards — 

$500 for information regarding Katie Mary Curran, 171 
Rules and Orders — 

Of 1873 temporarily adopted, 2 

Of last Board of Aldermen, adopted, with amendment, 7 

Of City Council, adopted, 7, 8 

Order passed for pocket edition, 98 

Salaries — 

Report of Com. on Salaries of city officers, 67 

Additional assistant to City Messenger, $400 per anmnn, 84 

Discussion on salaries for officers of Municipal Court, 

Charlestown Dist., 90 
Action on Salary Bill, 91, 93, 115 
Second report and action thereon, 1.53 
Order passed relative to horses and vehicles used bj- 8ui)er- 

intendents, 157 
Rc^jort on horses and vehicles used by Superintendents, etc., 

171 
Report on horses and vehicles used by Supt., etc., in Health 

Dept., 194 
Discussion on amendment to Salary Bill, 205, 214 
Report and discussion on salaries of Registrars of Voters, 

223, 239, 241 
Conference Committee appointed on Supt. Streets, 237 
Report of Conference Committee accepted, relating to Supt. 

Streets, and order passed, 255 
$200 per annum to di-aw-tender of No. Harvard St. Bridge, 

269 
$250 per annvmi to draw-tender of C.-Mubridge Bridge, 269 
$250 " " ^^'esteru .Vv. Bridge, 26',) 

Discussion on salaries of constables at Munieiiial Dist. 

Courts, 408 
Order passed relative to salaries of Superintendents of War- 
ren Bridge, Charles River Bridge, Maiden Bridge, and 

bridge over Charles River near Cottage Farm Station, 

432 
Increase of sal.iry of chief clerk in City Registrar's office, 4.32 
ReiJort and discussion on salaries of otticers of Municipal 

Courts, and order passed, 451 
Order passed establishing salary of ofiiccrs of Municiijal 

Court, Dorchester Dist., 463 
Schools — 

Order passed for rep.airing, etc.. High, Grammar, and 

Primary, 29 
Lewis School, order for additional tempor.ary accommoda- 
tions, 40 
Report accepted, inexpedient to enlarge Lexington St. lot, 47 
Order passed for additional gnunmar school accommodations 

in Lawrence Dist., 47 
Report accepted, leave to withdraw on Meigs's desk, 47 
Old Mather School-house, report amende<l and accepted, 84 
Union St. ami KockLind Primai-y Schools, Brighton, order 

passed to provide temporary accommodations, 119 
Discussion on act to leg.dize the City Normal Scliooi, 171, 194 
Normal School, discussion on, and orders passed rel.itive to 

incidental expenses and pay-roll of teachers, 213 
Order passed for enlargement of Roxbury High School 

building, 252 
Order passed for ero<'tion of Primary School-house on 

Quincy St., Ward 14, 252 
Order passed to purchase lot of land on Centre St., to be 

added to Lowell School-bouse yard, '299 
Order passed to furnish room for drawing classes in Girls' 

High School-house, 300 
Order passed to alter suitable room in old Citj'Hall, Charles- 
town, for drawing classes, 352 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



13 



Prescott District, Charlestown, orcler passed to provide ad- 
ditional pi-iraary-scliool accommodations, 371 
Order passed for purchase of land on West Fifth St., for 

primary school in Lawrence District, 401 
Prescott School-house, East Boston, order passed for alter- 
ations, 401 
Order passed to purchase site for grammar school-house, 

Winthrop District, 409 
Discussion on and order passed to contract for partial erection 
of grammar school-liouse, Prospect St., Charlestown, 428 
Dudley School-house, order passed for repairs, 432 
Order passed for purchase of site for primary school-house, 

Comins District, 433 
Purchase of site for school-house, Gibson District, author- 
ized, 450 
Order passed to erect primary school-house building, Gibson 

District, 453 
Order passed to erect primary school-house, Comins Dis- 
trict, 4(31 
Order passed to erect primary school-liousc, Lawrence Dis- 
trict, 482 
Report accepted relating to funds for Eliot School, W. Rox- 

bury, 50t) 
Order passed to establish evening school in Cabot St. Bath 

House, 540 
Order passed for free evening school in Wells School-house, 

546 
Order discussed and passed, providing for evening schools, 

563 
Discussion on, and order passed, to consider expediency of 

evening drawing school in East Boston, 600 
Discussion on and order passed, to establish evening drawing 

school at East Boston, 613 
Report accepted, and new reference ordered, relating to fire- 
escapes for Winthrop School-house, 682 
Order passed to rescind order respecting new Winthrop 
School-house, Charlestown, and order passed for build- 
ing new one, 706 
Discussion, and order passed, relative to I^autical School, 712 
Sealers of Weights and Measures — annual report, 17 
Order passed relating to appointment of deputies, 66 
Ordinance passed changing office location, 256 
Seventeenth June — 

Order passed relating to Charlestown District, 300 
Sewers — 

Report and order relating to Stony Brook Improvement, 74 
Hearing on Sewer in Brighton, 114 

" " in Commercial St., Dorchester, 203 

Order passed to pay for labor and matei-ials furnished for 
sewer in No. Howard and Franklin Sts., Brighton, and 
discontinuance of same, 210 
Stony Brook, order passed relative to City's right to drain 

into, 23S 
Order passed to renew covering of Stony Brook, 341 
Order passed to give notice to sundry persons in vicinity, of 
intention to lay sewer extending from Dudley Sc. to 
Quincy St., 4:32 
Notice from N. F. Saftbrd, of sheriff's jury, 450 
Order to extend in Summer St., 452 
Hearing on Sewer in Brook Ave., 454 
Resolve and orders relating to Dorchester Brook, 479 
Order passed to divert water on Dorchester Brook, 4S3 
Report no action necessary on petition of ilass. Hom. Hospi- 
tal for sewer in Stoughton St., 499 
Payment of bill for dredging Koxbury Canal approved, 514 
Order passed to rexJort on expediency of traps for water 

conductors, 516 
Report accepted inexpedient to attach traps to conductors, 

516 
Order passed to extend Stony Brook Sewer, 519 
Repoit r(dating to traps on drains from conductors, 54 4 
Order passed to take land of Joseph Ham, 563 
Order passed to petition for system of sewerage frjm Mystic 

Fond, 623 
Order to construct in Merchants' Row, 9 
" " Paris St., 152, 270 

" " Dorchester St., 170 

" " Westminster St., 194 

" " Circuit St., 194 

" " Washington St. (Charlestown), 194 

" " Walnut Ave., 194 

" " Adams St., 194 

" " Erics.son St.,213 

" " Chelsea St., 213 

" Princeton St.,213 

" " Elmwood St., 220 

" " Washington St., 220 

" " Pynchon St., 220 

" " Putnam St., 238 

" " Emerson St., 238 

" " Washington St. (new part), 270 

" " No. Anderson St., 270 

" " Mechanic St., Roxbury, 270 

" " Waterford 8t.,270 

" " Hannhon St.,321 

" " Condor St., 321 

" " Bird St., 341 



Order to construct in Fairfield St., 341 

" Hartford and High Sts., 380 

" " Magazine St., 380 

" " Third St., 380 

" " Marcella St., 431 

" " So. Eden St., 431 

" " Warren Place, 431 

" << Rochester St., 4;31 

" " Brook Ave., 431 

" " Eighth St., 431 

" " Allston St., 452 

" " Linwood St., 463 

" " Harrison Ave., 463 

" " Medford St., 479 

" " Dennis St., 479 

«' " Blue Hill Ave., 479 

«' " Waverley St., 479 

" " Oneida St., 492 

" " Albany St., 492 

" " Qnincv St.,499 

" " BUxe Hill Ave, 499 

" " Putnam St., 499 

" " Chelsea St., .506 

" " Marcella St., 514 

" " Sixth St., 514 

" " Sawyer St., 531 

" " Centre St., .5.31 

" " Highland St., 531 

" " Dorchester Ave., 544 

" " Cottage St., 556 

" " Pond St., 556 

" " Pleasant St., ,5.56 

" " Dorchester Ave., 556 

" " Grant St., 556 

" " Spring Gardens, 556 

" " Crescent Ave., 556 

" " Amory St., 556 

" " School St., .556 

" " Atherton St., 556 

" " Arcadia St., 556 

" " Beethoven St., 556 

" " Bedford St., o6J 

" " Ericsson St., 594 

" " Russell Court, Ward 15, 594 

" " Ninth St., 598 

" " Emerson St., 593 

" " Perrin St., 6S2 

" Third St., 624 

Sinking Funds — 

Semi-annual report of Commissioners, 28, 456 
Small-pox — 

Discussion on and order passed to purchase land for hospi- 
tal, 317 
Discussion on buying land for hospital, 361 
Soldiers' lielief — Quarterly reports of Paymaster, 8, 181, 410, 5.53 
So. Boston Flats — 

Order passed to pay expenses of joint special committee to 

1872, 341 
Order j^assed to report action desirable in relation to im- 
provement, 513 
So. Boston R. Co. — 

Order passed to pave tracks on Broadwaj', 263 
Hearing on second track on Fourth St., 3ol 
Additional track on Fourth St. granted, 427 
Order for location on Fourth St. reconsidered, 4-37 
Order passed granting additional track on Fourth St., 479 
Location accepted, 483 
Authorized to lay additional tracks, 706 
Soup for the Poor — 

Order passed for distribution by Police, 623 

Discussion on, and non-concurrence on I'eference to special 

Committee, 662 
Repeated non-concurrence, discussion, and refusal to recon- 
sider, 678, 688 
Petition from Lydia M. Warner, forbearing, 687 
Cora, of conference appointed, 706 
Report of conference committee accepted, inability to agree, 

and adherence, 717 
Report of Com. accepted, no action required on petition of 
Ly<lia M. Warner, 717 
Special Committees — 

On U. S. Post Office, to go to Washington, 8 

Joint, to nominate city officers, 8, 18 

Fort Hill imiirovement, 9 

Aimy and Navy monument on Boston Common, 9 

Unclaimed baggage, Albany R., 36 

On Com from Mass. Char. Mec. Assoc, relating to FranUliu 

Fund, 3rt9 
To examine municipal election returns, 691 
Stables — 

Smith's Riding School, discussion 31 ; discussion and leave 
to witlidraw. 37; discussion on motion to reconsider, on, 
54,303; report re-committed, 59S; report accepted, and 
leave to build riding school stable granted, 600 
Discussion relating to Metropolitan it. R. stable on Back 
Hay, 139 
State Aid — see Soldiers' Relief. 



It 



INDEX TO I'lIOCEEDIXGS OF HOAIM) OF ALDEILMEX. 



Stt'bbins (AldcriTian)— rcnuirks: on 

\Vil.-<f)ii's Hotel. Ward I'J, 2 i 

I-tcpi iiuiii^ report on water supply, 49, 54 

AVidciiiMsjof Atlantic Ave., 64 

'J'lie I'ark queslion, 6!t 

Cliarifini; for use of Atlantic Ave, 72 

Itallriiad ('rossin!;.-) in East Boston, 7:i 

Consolidation of Water Boards. 70. 211, 371, 397 

I'orlable stoves, etc., on sidewalks, 85 

Salaries of city oflicers, 91, 93, 116, 163, 214 

License for plumbers, 82 

Elevator in City Hall. 115 

AVater supply, 104, 301, 402 

Kunriiiii; fi-rry tolls. 120 

Police and lire-boat. 120 

Jourdain's Museu'u of .\natomy, 123 

De.aili of Hot). Clias. Sumner, 126 

Railway station near Cliestmit Hill reservoir, 153 

Appropriation bill, 107, 181, 189 

Bound.iry between Boston and Brookline, 179 

Kemoval of oflice of Milk Inspector, 1S2 

Horse r.dlway system, 192 

Assessment on rarker-Memorial Mceting-TIousn, 204 

Act to lei.(alize Normal School, 213 

Salaries of lvei,'istrars of Voters, 224, 2.39, 242 

Additional appropriation for printing proceedings of City 
Council, 227 

Transfer of Mass. Law Ueports to Law Dept., 227, 237 

Alinority report on water supply. 237 

Assista:iceto Supt. Dover St. Brid<;c, 2.54 

Allowance for Decoration Dav, 266 

M'ater-slied of Mystic I^ake, 284 

Hampden St. District, 300 

I'urcliase of land for SmrUlpox liospital, 317 

Additiimal copies of Sumner Memorial, 332 

Free open-air concerts, 3.')2 

District inuidcipal courts, 359 

Appomtini,' physicians to examine water qualities, 361 

Contract for publishing the oflicial report, 369 

Allowing police olllcers free passes over ferries. 3S9 

Salaries of constables at municipal district courts, 409 

Sale of city's land on Pleasant and Eliot Sts., 436 

Ventilation of City Hall, 447 

Watering Park Sq., 4oO, 456 

Salaries of officers in district courts, 451 

Defective conductors on buildings, 452 

Barnum's Hippodrome, 455 

Contract to w-ater Park Sq., 456 

Widening Uuild Kow, 4-')6 

Cleaniiifr and painting Public Library, 462 

Home for the Poor, .515 

Wood pavemc^nts in Devonshire St., 528 

Extension of Lenox St., 529 

" Thorndike St., 529 

Feeding horses in streets, 539, 546 

Rcpaving Lewis St., 541 

Hotel at (Mty I'oiiit, 562 

Evening Sciiools, 564 

Paving city passageways, 570 

Pumping engines at Lake Cochituate, 598 

Vacancies in Water 15oard, 699 

Licensing I'lumbers, 010 

Fast driving, 611 

Water for East Boston, 622, 624 

Charles River water supply, 628 

Blockades on Tremont St,, 646, 649, 692 

Soup for the Poor, 6ii2 

Limiting appro.acli of cars, 677 

Widening School St., 687 

Gen. Butler's otfer of Sudbury River, 630, 691 

Boston Water Power Co. and Back Bay streets, 695 

Nautical School, 713 

Water supply for Wards 17 and 19, 715 

Citizens' Gaslight Co., 744 
Street Commissioners — Annual report of, 16 
Streets — 

Com. on Streets authorized to refer claims to arbitration, 9 

Order p.-vssed for removal of projecting signs, 19 

Supt. authorized to purchase supplies, lay cross-walks, fur- 
nish and set edgestoues, pave gutters and sidewalks, 
number streets, erect fences, grant permits for moving 
buildings, grant permits to open streets, 19 

Regulations adopted for raising and lowering merchandise, 
19 

Order passed for prosecution of Daniel Goodnow for main- 
taining a bay window, 29 

Projecting signs, report from Com, on Police accepted, 39 

Annual report of Supt., 63 

Order passed to favor the act authorizing construction of 
new avenue between Boston and Cambridge, 04 

Report and discussion on widening Atlantic Ave., 64 

Discussion on (-harges for use of Atlantic Ave. and rejection 
of order, 72 

Remonstrances against widening Atlantic Ave., 72 

Order passed changing name of Central Place to Music 
Hall Place, 84 

Order passed to fill with ashes city wharf lot, Medford St., 
Charlestown, 84 



Order passed relating to portable furnaces, stoves, etc., on 

sidewalks, 85 
Petition from Josiah Quiney relative to widening of Atlan- 
tic .Vve., 90 
Order passed for proportionate assessment of sidewalks and 

<'dgestones, 101 
Order passed for notice to be given to owners on Burnt 

Dist. of intention to raise grade, 102 
Order passed to give name of Atlantic Ave. to part of Broad 

St., 136 
Supt. ordered to rebuild the bulkhead on Condor St., East 

Boston, 139 
Order passed rel.iting to projecting signs, etc., in Milk and 

(Hiver Sts., 151 
Water-street extension, discussion on, 167 
Order passed relating to partition wall on Wa.shington 

Square, 109 
Order passed for repair of paving wharf, 169 
Discussion on order to pay $325,000 to Chas. G, Greene and 

others, 181 
Order passed on Swctt-strcet extension, 181 
Discussion on abatement of betterment assessed on Parker- 

.Memorial .Moeting-Hoiise, 2.)4 
Order passed to remove fiagstaft's East Broadway, 209 
Order passed relative to projecting signs, etc., 209 
Order passed for remo\al of flagstaff at corner of ^Market 

and River Sts., Xo. Brighton, 210 
Order passed auth(U-iziug E. H. R. Rugglcs to cut down 

tree on Richmond St., Ward 16, 214 
Order jjassed authorizing A. T. Howe to cut down two trees 

on Forest St., 214 
Resolve and order from Street Commissioners for widening 

Shawmut Ave. between Dudley and Guild Sts., 223 
Order passed to keep open old Providence Depot Site, 241 
Discussion on wood pavement in Kilby St., 207 
Order passed to uati'r ('(dumbus Ave. bctwe(!n Bost. and 

Albany R.R. and Park Square, 270 
Order jjassed to close, and lay tracks to grade Brookline 

Ave., 270 
Order passed to consider expediency of laying out Marctlla 

St., to New He.ath St., 270 
Reports and orders from Street Commissioners relating to 

extension of Clifton St., and widening Leveretl St., 286 
Discussion on, and order passed for expense of paving 

Kilby St., to be charged to appropriation for Burnt 

Dist., 287 
Order passed for removal of tree on Waverlj- St., 301 
Order passed for moving telegraph poles on Dorchester 

Ave., 302 
Discussion on order to extend name of Dudley St. tlirough 

Stougliton St., 313 
Order passed for change of conditions attached to land on 

corner of Broadway and L St., 317 
Order passed for removal of projecting signs, etc, on 

Washington St., 335 
Discussion on widening Shawmut Ave., 3.36 
Report accepted, inexpedient to open new avenue to Cam- 
bridge, 338 
Rejiort accepted, inexpedient to w iden Cross St., 338 
Discussion on, and order passed to pave ^^'ater St. witli 

wood, 357 
Resolve and order from Street Com. for widening Beach St., 

353 
Notice received of closure of Fisher Ave. (private way), 353 
Order passed for removal of ajiple-tree on Richmond St., 

376 
Discussion on order for taking Beach St. Presbytirian 

Church, 378 
Order passed for removal of dead trees from Charlestown 

District, 379 
Columbia St., order passed to close temporarily, 3S0 
Western Union Telegraph Co. authorized to place poles on 

Parsons and Washington Sts., Brighton, 3;>1 
Order passed to close and build retaining wall and fence on 

Seaverns Ave., W. Roxbury, 391 
Order passed for cidleetion of half the cost of laying side- 
walks on Chandler St., 391 
Ordir passed to give notice to occupants of estates on Madi- 
son I'lace to quit by Aug. 1, 4o;i 
Order passed to provide means for purcliase of Beach St. 

Presbyterian Church, 403 
Order passed to water streets around new Post Otllce, 414 
Discussion on watering Warren St., Roxbury, 414 
Order passed rebating to safety of passengers on streets iu 

Ward 10, intersecied by railroad tracks, 417 
Com. on Streets authorizeu to confer with N. V. and N. E. 

R. relative to grade at Swett-street crossing, 417 
Report and order passed for widening Brattle St., 430 
Order passed relative to boundarv post in centre of Hyde 

Park Ave., 431 
Order passcil ibr collection of one -half amounts assessed on 

persons in London, E, St. .Tames, Dudley Sts., {,"ommon- 

weaUh Ave., Broadway and Haynes St., 431. 
Order passed to pay i5,l,027 to Caleb H. Dollteare for per- 
mission to build Atlantic Ave. retaining wall in front 

of his estate, 434 
Discussion on revoking license to Benj. Jones to sprinkle 

I'ark Sq., 450 



INDEX TO TROCEEDINGS OF ROARD OF ALDERMEN. 



15 



Order passed to remove pavement, and macadamize around 
building of iriniioipal Court, So. Boston, •152 

Discus-ion on order for wood pavement in Gold and Silver 
Sts., 4'>3 ; reconsideration laid on table, 403 ; refused, 479 

Discussion on and orderpassed relative to contract for water- 
ing Park Sq., 4o6 

Order passe. 1 to place Haven lot on Clifton St. in charge of 
Com. on Paving, 471 

Permission granted for wire rope across Foundry St., 473 

Order of notice to Middlesex K. Co. to pave Main and Bev- 
erly Sts., 4'J8 

Report accepted, and opinion of City Solicitor, relating to 
passageway in rear of building on Eastern Ave., 4yS 

Report and discussion on allowing fast riding, 4yS 

Order passed for edgestones, and paving on city passageway 
from Shasvmut Ave. to Trcniont St., 506 

Order passed for new location for bound-stone between 
Hyde Park and Boston, 506 

Resolves and orders from Street Commissioners for laying 
out East Lenox ami Thorndike Sts., 505 

Order passed to till up hole at corner of Boston and Hamlet 
Sts., Ward 16, 527 

Order passed for edgestones and paving gutters front of 
estate owned \iy City on Washington St., Ward 19, 527 

Discussion, and order passed to pave Devonshire St. from 
State to Milk St., with burnettized wood, 527 

Report accepted relative to obstruction by street pedlers, .')2S 

Report discussed, and order passed to extend Lenox St., .52J 

Report discussed, and order passed to extend Thorndike 
St., 529 

Ordinance reported, relating to fast driving, .5.30 

Order passed to consider expediency of widening School 
St., 540 

Remonstrances against fast driving, 540 

Order of notice to E. S. Johnson and J. T. Mason to quit on 
extension of E. Lenox St., 545 

Communication from Ferry Directors, requesting repaving 
of Lewis St., 541 

Discussion on feeding horses in streets, 546 

Hearing on fast driving on Milldam, 550 

Discussion on, and order passed relative to number of horse- 
cars, 556 

J. W. HunnewcU & Co. permitted to lay iron pipe under 
Bremen St., 550 

Order passed to p.ay Caleb H. Dolbearo $1,027 towards ex- 
pense of retaining wall, 559 

Order passed for retaining wall at end of Yarmouth St., 5.59 

Statements received of lunnber of horse-cars, and referred 
to Paving Com., with instructions, 501 

Substituted ordinance passed relative to fast driving, recom- 
mitted, 56S 

Orders of notice to A. P. Wheelock and IN". Adams to quit 
on Silver St., 563 

Order passed to accept passageway iu rear of E. Chester 
Park, 563 

Resolve and order from Street Commissioners for Swett-st. 
extension, 574 

Report on baiting horses in streets, 584 

Letters from City Solicitor, reconsideration of votes, and in- 
detinJte postponement of orders relating to care of pas- 
sageways, 5S5 

Order passed to grant additional tracks to Cambridge R. R. 
at foot of Leverett St., 594 

Order passed to name certain ways in Ward 10, Waterloo 
S"., and Sydney Place, 594 

Order passed to allow baiting horses in streets, .594 

Order passed for Com. to report relative to cattle in streets, 
594 

Fhineas B. Smith and John T. Soren authorized to remove 
trees, OUO 

Ordinance passed relative to rate of speed in driving, 611 

Communication from Chief of Police relf.ting to blockades 
by horse-cars, 611 

Leave granted to Wm. Homes to remove tree on Belk'vue 
St., 030 

Order passed for edgestones, corner Washington and School 
Sts., Ward 17, 641 

Manley Howe permitted to place lamp-post in Broadway, 

6-1:2 

Resolve and order from Commissioners for widening Shaw- 
mut Ave., 642 

Wm. Makepeace and others permitted to set out trees, 642 

Resolve and order from Commissioners for widening Bou- 
doiu St., 664 

Order passed for agreement with R. trustees for widening 
Cottage-street Bridge, 677 

Order passed to limit approach of cars to thirty feet, 677 

Resolve and order from Commissioners for widening Pleas- 
ant St., Charlestown, 678 

Downer Kerosene Oil Co. authorized to con.struet platform 
over First St., 677 

Notice of claim to portion of sidewalk on Pearl St., G7S 

Order passed granting permission to lay steanipipc under 
Devonshire St., 681 

Report accepted, leave to withdraw, on drainage of passage- 
ways, 082 

Discussion on, and order rejected to widen School St., 687 

Reports on extension of Swett St., 08J 



Report on Boston Water Power Company's improvements 
on Back ]^ay, 690 

Discussion on horse-car blockade, and order and resolve re- 
ferred to Paving Com., 692 

Discussion on, and reconnnittal of rcpnrt and orders re- 
lating to Boston Water Power Co. and Back Bay streets, 
1.95 

Resolve and order for extension of Commerce St., 695 

Jamaica I'lain Gaslight Co. authorized to lay tracks across 
Kcyes St , 7u6 

Orders of notice to quit passed, on South and Ma'den Sts., 
7ti7 

Orders passed for extension of Commerce St. and assump- 
tion of betterments, 708 

Order passed for purchase of street-sweeping machines, 710 

Reports on recommitted orders relating to Boston Water 
Power Co. and Back Bay streets, and discussion, 710 

Order passed to inquire authority for placing telegraph poles 
in Atlantic Ave , 712 

Discussion on extending Swett St., 71+ 

Post Oflice Square named, 695; reconsidered and referred, 
714 

Discussion on, and order passed for extension of Swett St., 
717 

Report accepted, and order discussed and passed to name 
Post Oifice Square, 740 

Discussion and order passed to pay J. H. Jenkins $400 for 
clerical services, 741 

Order passed to contract with Choate Bui-nham for 300 feet 
of grading on Vale St., 748 

Faiieuil Hall sidewalk, discussion on, 751 

Report accepted, stating authority for placing telegraph 
poles on Atlantic Ave., 767 

— .Vtlieiis St. — order passed to establish grade between F and 

l)orche..-ter Sis., 66,72; order passed to set edgestones and 
sidewalks, 427 

— Argyle St. — order passed to establish grade, 29 

— All'ord St — order passed to pave, 262 

— Asliland St. — Elisiia T. Loring allowed to remove trees, 53 

— Autumn St. — Ward 15 — order passed to furnish and set 
edgestones, 431 

— A Ihert St. — order passed to set edgestones and pave gutters, 

471 

— A I ban St. — orderpassed to establi.«h grade, 29 

— .\da.ns St. — order passed to furnish and set edgestones. 370 

— .\lpine St. — order passed to establish revised grade, 391 
^Amorj^St. — order passed to furnish aijd set edgestones and 

pave gutters, 371 

— Akron St. — orderpassed for edgestones, and paving gutters 

and crossings, 527 

— Albany St. — order passed to pave from Concord St. to Ro.x- 

bury Canal. 553 

— Alford St. — Charlestown, — Boston RubberShoe Co. allowed 

to erect telegraph poles, 491 

— Athens St. — order passed to pave, between B and C Sts., 

610 

— Broadway — order passed to furnish and set edgestones from 

X to Q Sts.. 167; order passed to pave from Dorchester to 
H St.. 220; order parsed to pave between K and L Sis., 282 

— Beacon St. — order passed to water, l:i2 

— Bolton St. — order passed to establish grade, 225; order 

passed to pave, 427 ; order passed to set edgestones and lay 
sidewalks, 427 

— Brookline Ave. — order passed to giado between Boston & 

Albany Railroad crossing and Muddy River, 192; order 
passed to grade between Boston it Albany R. R. and Ma- 
l)le Ave. 321; order passed to macadamize from Boston & 
Albany R. to Maple .\vc , 471; order passed to set edge- 
stones. lay gutters and sidewalks, 471 

— Beach St. — order passed to widen, 370; order p.assed to take 

surrendered estate of Presbyterian Church, 4ul 

— Bro(jks St. — order passed to set edgestones, 204 
^ Uuwer St. —order passed to set edgestones. 263 

— Bromley Park — orderpassed to set edgestones and pave 

gutters, 471 

— Bromley St. — order passed to set edgestones and pave gut- 

lers. 471 

— Blue-Hill Ave. —order passed to fill and grade sidewalks, 263 

— Butler St. — Ward 16 — order pa-sed to grade and gr.ivcl 

between Adams and Richmond Sts , 314 

— Blackstone St. — order passed to pave, 350 

— Benningion St. — order passed to set edgestones, hiy side- 

w.ilks, and pave gutters. 352 

— Beachaai St. — Charlestown — order passed to set edgestones, 

26i 

— Beverly St. — order passed to pave, 352 

— Briglit.in St. — order passed to pave, 352 

— Boston St. — order passed to furnish and set edgestones. 370 

— BnyMon St. — Ward 17 — order passed to furnish and set 

edgestones and pave gutters, 371 

— Bowdoin St. — ^\'ard 10 — order passed to widen, 600 

— Bennimrton St. —order [lasscd to furnish and set edgestones, 

and pave gutters and sidewalks. .500; onU-r passed to lay 
^idewalks at 78-82, 594; order passed to pave unpaved side- 
walks, .597 

— Boylst(ni St. — order passed to grade and macadamize, iJOS 

— Brooks St. — order passed to pavj sidewalks between Sarato- 

ga and Chelsea Sts , 597 



IG 



INDEX TO I'liOCEEDINGS OF I50A1I1) OF ALDEIJMEN. 



— Bniok Avo. — Ward 16 — order p^issed to establish revised 

sriide. 1)22 

— BurroiijilisSt — Ward 17 — order passed for edgestones and 

sidewalks. OU 

— Commonwialth Ave. — order passed to pave sidewalks of es- 

tates Nos. 1.58 to 16S, 21)9 

— Coliiiubus Ave. — order passed to pave, 3-)2 

— Chatliani Kow — order passed to pave, ;!V2 

— Canal St. — Charlestowii — order passed to extend name, 352; 

to set edgestones, lay sidewalks, and pave gutters, 3i2 

— Clifton Ht. — oriler passed to extend, 3:30 

— Commercial St. — order passed to pave, 352 

— Clielsea St. — order ))assed to set edgestones, lay sidewalks, 

and pave gutters, 3<)2 

— Cottage St. — order piissed to furnish and set edgestones, 370 

— Chandler St. — order passed to furnish and set edgestones, 

370 

— Crescent Ave. — Ward 16 — order passed to furnish and sot 

edgestones, 414 

— Causeway St. — order passed to pave frotn B. & M. R. R. to 

Commercial St., 352 
Cambridge St. — Brighton — order passed to i)ave gutters, grade 
and mac;idamize, 391 ; order i>assed to lay concrete sidewalk 
in front of estate of J. W. llollis, 391 ; order passed to pave 
gutters, grade and macadamize, 408 

— Cobb St. — order passed to lay sidewalks, and macadamize, 

434 

— Chelsea St. — order jiassed to pave sidewalks, furnisli and set 

edgestones, 490 

— Cedar St. — Removal of tree authorized, 514 

— Charles St. — Ward 16 — order passed to grade and macadam- 

ize, 594 

— Church St. — Ward 16 — order passed to grade, 695 

— Commerce St. — order passed for laying out and extension to 

Atlantic Ave., 708 

— Division St. —order |)assed to grade between Dorchester Ave. 

and Foundry St., 220; order passed to remove obstructions 
on line, 210 

— Dudley St. —order passed to set back fence, and pave side- 

walks, 343; extended over portion of Stoughfon St., 391; 
order jiassed to furnish and set edgestones and pave gutters 
and sidewalks, 414 

— Dorchester St. — order passed to lay sidewalks, and pave, 

434 ; order passed to furnisli and set the edgestones, and jiave 
gutters and sidewalks on the westerly side, 474 

— Dorr St. —order passed to furnish and set edgestones, and 

pave sidewalks, 270 

— Dorchester Ave. — order passed to furnish and set edgestones, 

370; order passed to pave square, and furnish and set edge- 
stones and pave sidewalks, at intersection of Dorchester 
Ave., Dorchester St. and Boston St., 473 

— Devonshire St.— order passed to pave with wood, 490, 499, 

527 

— E St. — order passed to pave from Sixth to Eighth St., 220 

— Eustis St. — order passed for removal of ol)structions pro- 

jecting over line, 85; order passed to set edgestones and lay 
sidewalks, 251; order jjassed to grade extension as far as 
Magazine St., 427 

— East Castle St. — changed to Mott St., 371 

— Elliot St. — Ward 17 — W. E. James allowed to remove trees, 

416 

— Exchange Place — order passed to pave, 220 

— Essex St. — order passed to pave from Washington St. to 

Harrison Ave., 434 

— Egle.ston 8q. — order passed to establish grade between Shaw- 

raut and Walnut Aves., 302 

— Eighth St. — order passed to lay sidewalks, 408 

— Eastern Ave. — order passed for removal of obstructions pro- 

.iecting over line, 402 

— East Lenox St. — order passed to establish grade, 514; order 

passed to extend to Fellowes St., 677 

— Eighth St. — order pas.sed to set edgestones, 677 

— Eden St. — Charlostown — George C. Wright permitted to re- 

move trees, 583 

— Foster St. — Ward 19 — order passed to furnish and set edge- 

stones, 314 

— Fifth St. — order passed to furnisli edgestones and pave gut- 

ters, 408; Dennis Ferguson allowed to remove tree, 416; 
order passed to lay sidewalk, 434 

— First St. — So. Boston — order jjasscd to pave sidewalk in 

front of No. 1, 473 

— Francis St. — order passed to set edgestones, lay gutters, and 

crosswidks, 472 

— Fourtli St. — order passed to pave space outside railroad 

tracks, 514; order passed to pave sidewalk, corner of G St., 
568 

— Fairfield St. — order passed for edgestones, pa\'ing gutters, 

and macadamizing the roadway, 5.59 

— Front St. — order passed to pave, 561 

— Franklin St. — I5righton — order passed to establish grade be- 

tween Cambridge St. and Boston & Albany R. R., 622 

— Francis St. — order passed to grade north of Brookline Ave., 

641 

— Guild Row — name changed, 352 

— Cilenwood St., Jioxbury — order p.assed to set edgestones, 

pave gutters and sidew.dks, 408 

— Gold St. — order passed to pave with wood, and lay sidewalks, 

408 



— Gray St. — order passed to furnish and set edgestones and 

pave sidewalks, 414 

— Gloucester St. — order passed to set edgestones, pave gutters 

and macadamize roadway, .505 

— G St. — order passed for edgestones and paving gutters and 

sidewalks, 561 

— Greenville St. — order passed for edgestones and sidewalks, 

622 

— Granite St. — Standard Sugar Refinery authorized to lay gas 

pipe, 023 

— Ualleck St. — order passed to establish grade, and to grade 

between Ruggles and Ward Sts., 167 

— H St. — order passed to lay plank walks, 251 

— Haymarkct Sq. — order passed to pave, 3.52 

— Heath St. — order passed to set edgestones and pave gutters, 

471 

— Haynes St. — order jiassed to set edgestones, pave gutters and 

repair roadway, 204 

— Hawes St. — order passed to pave with wood, 314 

— Harrison Ave. — order passed to pave sidewalks, 391 ; order 

passed to erect lences on easterlj- side, 435 

— Highland Sq. — order passed to pave unpavcd sidewalks, .506 

— Harrison Ave. — or<ler passed to grade sidewalks between 

Eustis and Dudley Sts., 568 

— Havre St. — order passed for edgestones and i)a\ing gutters, 506 

— H St. — order passed to set edgestones and pave sidewalks 

from Broadway to Emerson St., 610 

— Halleck St. — order passed for edgestones and sidewalks, 622 

— Kingsbury St. — order passed to grade, 167 

— K St. — order passed to set edgestones and pave gutters, 408 

— Kneeland St. — order passed to set edgestones, lay sidewalks 

and repair roadway, 257 

— K St. — order passed to pave sidewalks, from First St. to 

Broadway, 490 

— London St., East Boston — order passed to pave sidewalks in 

front of estates Xos. 131 to 149, 302 

— Levv'rctt St. — order passed to widen 2,931 square feet, 336 

— Lexington St. — order passed to lay sidewalks, set edgestones 

and pave gutters, 352 

— Long wood Ave. — order passed to set edgestones and pave 

gutters, 471 

— Lenox St. — order passed to pave sidewalks between Wash- 

ington St. and Sbawmut Ave., 402 

— Lowell St. — order passed to pave, 352 

— Lucas St. — order passed to close temporarily, 362 

— L St. — order passed for edgestones and paving gutters and 

Bidew;dks, 561 

— Leverett St. — order passed to grade and pave, 561 — order 

passed to widen, 687 

— liberty Sq. — order passed to substitute wood in place of 

granite blocks, 490 

— Marlboiougb 6t. —order passed to set edgestones, pave gut- 

ters, and macadamize roadway, 505 

— Main St. — order passed to set edgestones, 170 

— Magazine St. — order to remove obstructions projecting over 

lines, 85; order to grade, as extended, 220 

— Madison Sq. — order passed to set edgestones and pave gut- 

ters, 2B3 

— Mott St. — named, 371 

— Meridian St. — order passed to pave, 204; order passed to 

pave Central Sq. to Lexington St , 287 

— Mill St.. Charlestown — order passed to set edgestones and 

lay sidewalks, 262 

— Medford St., Cbarlestown —order passed to pave between 

Cook and Lexington Sts., 299; order passed to establish 
grade, 302; order passed to lay sidewalks from number 4-58 
to 464, iticlusive, 471 

— Melville Ave.. Dorchester —order passed to grade and 

macadamize, 299 

— Mechanic St. —order passed to establish grade, 362 

— Main St , Cbarlestown — order passed to pave, 490 

— Marion St. — order passed for edgestones and paving gutters, 

506 

— Midland St , Ward 16 — order passed to grade, 568 

— M St. — order passed to set edgestones. 677 

— Newcomb St. — order to change name from Prescott Place, 

Ward 11, 167 

— 'Nortli St. — order passed to pave, 352 

— Newbern St. — order passed to establish grade, and to grade, 

26i 

— Neponset Ave. — order passed to furnish and set edgestones, 

370 

— North Centre St. — order passed to widen, 563 

— Old Harbor St. — or<lcr i)assed to pave sidewalks between 

Old Harbor Court and Eighth St., 3U2 

— Old Harbor St. — order passed for edgestones and paving 

gutters, 561 

— I'rescott Place, Ward 11 — order passed to change name to 

Nev.'comb St., 167 

— I'rovidence St. — order passed to pave, 352 

— I'ond St. — order passed to furnish and set edgestones, 370 

— Princeton St. — order passed to furnish and set edgestones, 

pave gutters and sidewalks, 371 

— Parker St. — order passed to set edgestones and pave gutters, 

471 

— Paris St. — order passed to gravel, 204 

— Prescott St — order passed to lay sidewalks, set edgestones, 

and jjave gutters, 352 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



17 



-Park St. — Ward 16 — order passed to furnish and set cdge- 

sloncs and pave shutters, 3T1 
■Prentiss 8t. — order passed to pave gutters and lay sidewallis. 

471 
■Pond St. — order passed to sot edgestones, pave gutters, and 

macadamize roadway, 505 
-Princeton St., order for edgestones, 559 

■ Prescott St., —order passed to pave sidewalks between Sara- 

toga St. and Trenton. .5'J7 

■ Pleasant St., Cliarlestown — order passed to widen, 688 

■ Ruggles St. — order passed to pave sidewalks, between Tre- 

mont and Parlver Sts., 299 

- Richmond St., Chariestoun — order passed to set edgestones, 

lay sidewalks, pave gutters, 352 

- Uo.\bury St. — named, S'yi 

■ lU-ading St. — named, 456 

■ Regent St. — order passed for edgestones and paving gutters 

and crossings, 527 

-Rockland St. — order passed to establish grade, 514; order 
passed to grade. 514 

■Russell St., Charlestown — order passed for edgestones and 
paving gutters and sidewalks, 544 

-School St., Ward 20 — order passed to pave .sidewalk with 
brick. 241 

-School St., Ward 17 — oi-der passed to furnish and set edge- 
stones and pave gutters. 371 

- St. James St. — order passed to grade, 2R2 

- Shawm ut Ave. — order passed to widen between Dudley and 

Guild Sts., 352; order passed to furnish and set edgestones 
and pave gutters, 371 
■Seavcrns .-\ve , Wer^t Roxbury — order parsed to establish 
grade. 300; order ptissed to cut oil' or set back building of 
Mrs. Sarah Follan projecting over line. 414 

- Stoughton St. —order [).\ssed to sprinkle, 335; name of por- 

tion changed to Dudley St.. 391 

- Saratoga St. — order passed to set edgestones, lay sidewalks, 

pave glitters, 352 
-Short St., Charlestown — order passed to set edgestones, lay 

sidewalks, pave gutters, 352 
-Silver St. — order passed to set edgestones. Lay sidewalks, and 

jjave with wood. 408 

- Savin Hill Ave. — order pas ed to furnish and set edgestones, 

and pave gutters, 371 

- South St. — ord<'r passed to widen. 434 

-Sixth St. — order passed to furnish and set edgestones, and 

pave gutters and sidewalks, 4'.i0 
-Silver St. — order passed to furnish and set edgestones, and 

pave siilew.alks, and pave roadway with wood. 491 
-Second St. —order passed to furnish and set edgestones, and 

pave gutters and sidewalks from I to L Streets, 490 

- Saratoga St. — order passed to t'urnish and set edgestones, and 

pave sidewalks between Pnscott and Chelsea Sts., 490. 

- South St.. order p.issed to p.ave. 505 

- Seventh St. — order iJ.asscd for edgestones and paving gutters 

and sidewalks, 561 

-Sydney Place, Ward 16 — named, 594. 

-Sliawmut Ave. — order passed to widen from Lenox to Rox- 
bury St., (JS7 

-Treniont St. — order passed to lay sidewalks from Kendall 
to Hammond St., 262; order passed to repave sidewalk from 
Tremont House to Park St., 2S7 ; petitions fur removal of 
Paddock Elms referred, 36; remonstrance against same, 47; 
discussion on removal, 74; hearing, and order passed to re- 
move, 86 ; order to spare live rejected, 92 

-Trenton St. — order passed to set edgestones, lay sidewalks 
and pave gutters, .352. 

-Thornley St. — order passed to establish grade, 514. 

-Union St. — order passed to pave, 262 

-Washington St. — order passed for extension to Haymarket 
Sq., 120; order passed to grade and pave extension, etc.. 1, 
67, 179; order passed to establish revised grade between 
Court St. and Cornhill, 321; order passed for removal of 
obstructions between Averj' and Roylston Sts., 431; order 
to repave from Hay ward Place to Boj Iston St., 444; order 
passed to sprinkle, 450 

- W:ishington St., Ward 19 — order passed to complete grading 

and widening, between Cambridge St. and Brookline line, 
270; order passed to pave sidewalks between Shawmut and 
Shaler Ave, 302; order passed to extend name over Guild 
Row and Sliawmut Ave., 3')2; order passed for widening 
opposite Vernon St , 431 ; order passed to grade and macad- 
amize on new line of widening. 456; order passed to widen 
part t(n-inerly called Guild Kow, 456 

-White St. — order passed to lay brick sidewalks, 204 

-Warren St. — order passed to set edgestones and pave side- 
walks. 282 

-Water St.. Charlestown — order passed to close up openings 
in sidew.alks, 241 

-Warren St , Roxbury — order passed to w.ater, 414 

- West C:istle St. — changed to Castle St., 371 

-Water St. — order passed to pave with burnettized spruce 
blocks, 357 

- Woodward St. — order passed to set edgestones, pave gutters 

and sidewalks, 408 
-Warren St.. Charlestown — William Patterson allowed to 
remove tree, 416 

- West St., Charlestown — order passed to set edgestones, 263 



— Walnut Ave. —order passed to furnish and set edgestones 

and pave gutters, 473 

— Walk-Hill St. — order passed to establish grade, 362 

— Washington St., Ward 17 — order passed to make passable 

for public travel, 427 

— Webber St. — order passed to remove obstructions on lino, 

210 

— Warren Ave. — order passed to pave, 527 

— Washington St. — order passed to pave, from Chester Sq. to 

Newton St., 553; order passed to pave from Waltham to 
Newloii St., 553 

— Waterloo St., Ward 16 — named, 594 

— Waltham St. — order passed for edgestones and paving side- 

walks and gutters, 544 
Suftblk R. Co. — 

- Location to Haymarket square revoked, 491 
Suffolk St. District — 

Com on Xorthampton St. Dist. vested with powers, 37 
Order ])as.^ed for widening out sides of streets, -131 
Sumner, Charles — Resolutions in relation to death of, 127 
Committee appointed, 127 

Order to clear .Streets fir funeral procession, 139 
Portraits of, presented to City of Boston, 164, 204 
Resolution adopted by City of Brooklyn, concerning death 

of, 169 
Order passed to print 1,000 copies of Memorial, 210 
Trustees of .Vrt Museum autiiorized to receive the Sumner 

Request, 241 
Vote of thanks to Carl Schurz f .r eulogy, 2.V2 
Resolution of th inks to (J. H. Brainanl and others, for por- 
trait, and to ijhu'C same in l-aneuil Hall, 3Sa 
Resolution of thanks to K. D. Huntington ami others, for 
portrait, and to phice the same in l'u':lic Library, o8J 
Survey and Inspection of Buildings — see Buildings. 
Swett St. District — 

Order for Mayor to petition Legislature fa- authority to 
raise grade discussed, and referred to Com. on Xorth- 
ampton St. District, 300 

Taxes — $12,080,265 for 1814-5, laid. 166 

Amendment of tax levy, by omission of State tax, 139 
Order passed relating to interest, 31H 

Discussion and non-eoncurrenee relating to interest. 338, .352 
Conference Com. on interest, 4U9; discussion and concur- 
rence on ti'ii percent., 427 
Order passed to remit taxes on estate of Mary Ilolden. 477 
Order passed providing for payment of taxes on Lowell 
School-house site, 678 

Unclaimed Hagg.nge — 

Sale by British and North Am. Royal Mall Packet Co., 432 
Sale by Boston and Albany Railroad Co., 740, 767. 
Unflnished Business — 

Of last year referred to several joint committees, 8 

Of joint committes of last year referred to cuminitteea of 

this year. 8 
Of last Board of .Mdermen. to Committees, 9 
Referred to next City Council — Inspectors of Lighters. 767 ; 

ordinance relating to I.a w Depai tment, 767 ; laying out 

Swett St., 767 ; all business before joint committees, 767 
In hands of Committees of the Board, referred to next Board 

of .\ldernien, 767 
Union Freight R R.— 

Report accepted, authorizing removal of tracks to centre of 

Atlantic Ave., 612 

Vacation appointed. 463 

Discussion on, and vote to adjourn two weeks, 494 
Votes of 'I'hanks — 

To Hon. Carl Schurz for eulogy on death of Hon. Charles 
Sumner, 2 '2 

To Hon. Richard Frothingham, for oration on July Fourth, 
416 

To Gen. B. F. Butler for offer of Sudbury river, 767 

To Mayor, and response, 767 

To Chairman, and response, 708 

Washington's Birthd.ay — Order passed for observing, 03 
Water Works — Report of Cochituate Water Board, 20 

Order passed for (;om. to consider expedieiu^y of (connecting 

Farm Pond with Lake Cochituate, and Mystic Pond with 

(,'oncord River, 37 
Discussion on printing extra copies of report of Water 

Bo.ard, 54 
Order passed for Com. to ascertain purity of water in 

Charles River, 63 
Order passed fir Com. to report mill privileges on Charles 

and Sudbury rivers, 63 
Report from Printing Com. not to reprint report of Water 

Board, accepted, 66 
Order passed to consider expediency of union of Cochituate 

and Mystic AVater Boards, 67 
Discussion relating to consolidation of Boards, 77 
Discussion and order passed relative to licensing pluinbera, 

and reguladng constrnction of water fixtures, H2 
Discussion on addition to water sujJijly from Flax Pond, 

etc., and rejection of order, 104 



18 



INDEX TO rnOCEKDIXGS Or BOARD OF ALDERMEX. 



Discussion on consolidation of "Water Boards, and order 

piirtSCll, li<» 

Conimiinication from City Solicitor on consolidation of Wa- 
ter Hoards, lilt 

Report of Myslic Water Board, 137 

Order ])assiil relative to surveys of ifystie water-shed, 157 

tli'ilcr passed for ( 'ominitlie to report in print, l.'iT 

Ueport Oil coiisoliilatioii of Water Boards, and Act and Or- 
dinaiiee for same, 211 

Report (City Doc. ;«) accepted, 237 

Order jiassed for Cocbituatc Water Board to report in print, 
264 

Order passed to supply Ward 17 with water for extinguish- 
iu;; tires, 2ti4 

Coiumunieation from Water Hoard, relating to main pipe in 
Wards i;i, 14, l") and lt>, 2m 

(ojumunieatiuri relating to drainage in Wards 15 and 17, 267 

Discussion on, and order passed rela.iiig to, water-shed of 
Mystic Lake, 284 

Order passed for consideration of purifying Mystic Pond, 287 

liepcrts from Committee on Ordinances, relating to consoli- 
dating Water Hoards, 287 

f:xtension in Wards l:i, U, 15, 16, 17 and 19, 301 

Order passed for t ity Solicitor to attend next annual meeting 
of Mystic lliver Corporation, 306 

Report from Mystic Water Hoard on construction of sewer, 
316 

Order passed for extension of water works in Wards 13, 14, 
15, 10, 17 and 19, 317 

Oi'der passed for Mayor to petition for authority to construct 
s(-\vers to preserve Mystic Lake, 320 

Order passed for Mystic Water Board to furnish estimate of 
expense of sewer, 320 

Discussion on, and non-concurrence in, appointinent of engi- 
neers to ascertain possible water snp])ly, 336 

Discussion and non-concurrence on order to appoint three 
pliysicians to examine sanitary qualities of fsudbury. 
Mystic, Shawsliine and Charles rivers, 338; re-considcr- 
ation and order passed, 361 : ( 'ommissioners appointed, 447 

Annual report of Cocbituatc Water Hoard, 353 

Order passed for (.'ommittee on Water to report whether 
Mysiic and Cochituate lakes are sutticient for supply, 352 

Order passed to report on expediency of using Lake Cochitu- 
ate for purification of Sudbury Hiver water, 371 

Discussion on consolidation of the two Water Boards, 37 1391 

Order jiassed for (Cochituate Water Board to report action 
necessary to prevent waste, 390 

Order passed for examination of Charles River as a source 
of supply, 402 

Report and order passed to extend main water pipe from 
< anal St. to City Sii., Charlcstown, 415 

Medical Commission authorized to report in print, 563 

Communication from Com. on Sewers relative to water sup- 
ply and drainage, 569 

Orders passed to petition for power to divert Pegan Brook, 
594 

Ordinance passed relating to water rates, .596 

Carder passed to estat>Ush pumping engines at Lake Cochitu- 
ate, 598 

Discussion on, and order passed for filling vacancies in Co- 
chituate Water Board, 599 

Discussion on licensing plumbers, and regulating water iix- 
tiires, 610 

Report on drainage of Mystic Pond, 611 

l'c;iiion for supply of pure water for Kast Boston, 622 

Order passed to consider expe<liency of turning Nonesuch 
Pond into Lake Cochituate, 622 

Order passed for survey of Flax and other ponds in Lynn, 624 

Order passed for licensing of plumbers, 627 

Discussion on, and order passed to petition for supply from 
Charles lUver, ()2S 

Communication from B. F. Butler, rel.ating to taking Sud- 
bury River, discussion, and reference, 629 

Order passed to consider expediency of bonding land for 
basins on Mystic River, 641 

Sudbury River Sclieme, discussion on, and order passed to 
investigate alleged frauds, 641 

Report on Mystic sewerage referred to the Com. on Water, 
611 

Otter I f Sudbury water by Essex Company, 641 

Committee from Cochituate Water Board on contracting for 
jdpes, 642 

'Report referred on supply for Wards 17 and 19, 643 

Report on expediency, and order i)assed authorizing bond- 
ing of land for Mysti<' basins, 643 

Repint atid order passed for surveys for Mystic drainage, 643 

Report and order passed relating to com. from B. F. Butler, 
043 

Rcconsidcr.ation refused relative to licensing plumbers, 647 

Members of Cochituate Water Hoard elected, 662, 678 

Order jiassed to report ordinance to regulate Mystic Water 
R.Mtes, 61)6 

Mystii- Water Rates, order passed to fix same as Cochituate, 
677 

Cotn. from Water Board, staling refusal of proprietors to 
give iree use of Sudbury Kivcr, 679 

Motion to reconsider Uen. Butler's offer, discussed and laid 
on table, 691 



Report of Medical Commission, 695 

Report of Com. accepted relating to charges of fraud, 706 

Report accepted, no action necessary on Water Supply for E. 

Boston, 707 
Report relating to supply for Wards 17 and 19, 707 
Report on contracting for water-pipes, 707 
Onler passed to contract for pipes, 715 
Order passed relative to temporary supply for W. Roxhury 

and Brighton, 715 
Report, discussion, and order passed relative to Water Sup. 

ply for Wards 17 and 19, 715 
Report and order to seize Sudbury River, and amendment to 

order passed, 767 
Worthington (Alderman) remarks: on — 
The Park (lueslion. 17, 68 
Wilson's Hotel. War.l 19, 20 40 
Smith's Riding School. 31, 37, 50. 303 
Reprinting Report on Water Supply, 49 
Widening of Atlantic Ave., 64 
Charges for use of Atlantic Ave., 72 

I'lacing Milk Inspector under di rection of Board of Health, 72 
Removal of I'addock Elms, 76, 89, 92 
Licenses for Plumbers, 82 
Salaries of City officers, 91, 93, 153, 205 
Naming Curtis Hall. 121 
The Water Supply, 105, 371 

Railw.ay Station at Chestnut Hill Reser\-oir, 136, 153 
Metropolitan R. R. Stable on Back Bay, 139 
Sale of Fort Hill Property, 150 
Appropriation Bill, 167,181 
Water Street Extension, 168 
Act to legalize Normal School, 173 
Removal of office of Milk Inspector, 182, 194, 288, 362 
Elevator in City Hall, 222 
Salaries of Registrars of Voters, 224, 239, 242 
Expenses of Common and Public Grounds, 226 
Appropriation for Decoration Day, 265, 270 
Water-shed of Mystic Lake, 284 
1'aking old High School House for armory, 289, 314 
Hampden Street District, 300 

Extending name of Dudley St. through Stoughton St., 314 
-Allowance for Fourth July, 314 
Purchase of land for Small-pox hospital, 317, 360 
Widening Shawmut Ave. between Dudley and Guild Sts.,336 
Appointment of engineers to examine Water Supply, 335 
Order to pay SB. lleustis for extra sei vice, 340 
Order to pave Water St. with wood. 358 
Contract for publishing the official report, 370 
Consolidation of the Water Boards, 375 
Appointing physicians to examine water qualities, 361 
Taking Beacli St. Presbyterian Church, 378 
Widening Brattle St , 430 
Ventilation of City Hall, 435, 447 
Sale of (Jity's land on Pleasant and Elliot Sts., 436 
Establishing public urinals, 448 
License to Benj. Jones to sprinkle Park Sq., 450 
Defective conductors on buildings, 452 
Standpipes in public buildings, 4.53 
Home for the Poor, 460, 476, 501,506, 516, 580 
Widening Guild Row, 4.56 
Clciiiiing and Painting Public Library, 462 
Printing Solicitor's repoit semi-annually, 463 
Grade of houses above tide water, 478 
Enforcement of the Grade Law, 493 
Cellars below grade, 494, 584 
Repairs of armories, 540, 597 
Evening Schools, 564 
Paving city passageways, 570 
Bridge on Ashland St., 578 
Standpipes for School-houses, 599 
Public Parks, 594 
Licensing Plumbers, 611 
Furnishing Court Uooms,613 
Wate- for East Boston. 622 
General Butler's otter of Sudbury River, 630 
Blockades on Tremont St., 647, 693 
Wideinng School St., 687 

Boston Water Power Co. and Back Bay Sts., 695, 711 
Extension of Swett St., 714, 718 
Water Supply for Wards 17 and 19, 716 
A ppleton Temporary Home, 716 
Water from Charles River, 628 
'J"he Law Department, 738 
Naming Post Oftice Square, 740 
Compensation for clerical services, 741 
Citizens' Gaslight Co., 744, 751 
Faneuil Ilall sidewalk, 752 
Ward 14 — 

Resignation of Clerk, 664 

FINAL PROCEEDINGS. 

Resolution of Th.anks to the Mayor, 767 

Response of M.ayor, 767 

Resolution of Thanks to Chairman, 768 

Response of Chairman, 7(58 

Order passed to print final proceedings, 768 

Adjournment, nine die, 768 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



19 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OE COMMON COUNCIL. 



ORGANIZATION AND REGULAR MEETINGS. 

Called to ordor hy senior member, George A. Shaw, 1 

Address of Mr. Shaw, 1 

Credentials of nieml)ers received, and quorum reported, 1 

Notice to Mayor and Aldermen, of quorum present, 1 

Convention, and qualification of members, 1 

Edward O. t~liepard elected President, 1 

Address of President, 2 

Wusliiiigton 1». Gregg elected Clerk, 2 

Oatli of uflice adminintered to Clerk by Cily Solicitor, 2 

Notice to Board of Aldermen of organization of Common Coun- 
cil, 2 

Notice from Board of Aldermen of organization of that body, 2 

Thursday evening, lialfpast seven o'clock, assigned for regular 
meetings, 3 

ALPHABETICAL INDEX. 

Adams. Mr., Ward 16 — remarks: on 

Referring report of Fire Commissioners, 81 

Salaries of Kiremen, etc., 146 

New engine-houses, 2)9 

The Water Supply. 278, 347 

Nonesuch I'ond Water Scheme, 675 
Annexation — 

Treasurers of Charlestown, W. Roxbury, and Brighton, 
authorized to pay bills, 3 

Bubordinate employes retained, 3 

Discusfion on, and order passed relative to annexation of 
Hrookline, 183 

Oi'der relating to, and discussion on general annexation, 184 
Annual reports — 

Buiierinlendents and Boards authorized to present in print, 4 
Appropriations — 

Disposition of unexpended appropriations from Charles- 
town. W. Roxbury. and Brighton, 11 

One-half of fees for dog licenses in VV. Roxbury to W. Rox- 
bury Free Library, 98 

Report of Committee, on Auditor's Estimates, and order re- 
lating to Specific Api^ropriations, 133 

Action on Approprialion Bill, 141, 146, 162 

Discussion, and order passed on transfers for closing busi- 
ness of linaneial year. I.j9 

Adherence to amendment to Appropriation Bill, 174 

Concurrence in amendment to Appropriation Bill, $20,000 
for school-house site, Everett Dist., and omission of 
State Tax. 197 

$150 per annum for ringing bell of Unitarian Church, 
Brighton, 325 

$344 35 for reception and entertainment of Philadelphia 
delegation, 385 

Discussion on, and order passed to provide means for, pur- 
chase of Beach St. Presbyterian Church, also to take the 
property, 4<j6 

Discussion on transfers for certain school-houses, Common, 
etc., 517 

Order passed to charge expense of laying out Hunneman 
St, to Northampton St. District, 755 

Order passed to pay J. II. Jenkins $400 for services as Clerk 
of Com. on Streets. 755 

Order passed to pay bills of certain city officers for extra 
services, 756 
Appropriations, additional — 

spln.OOO for Overseers of Poor, 145 

$36,000 for Fire Department, 145 

$2,500 for Assessors' Department, 145 

$1,500 for reporting and publishing proceedings of City 
Council, 245 

$250.04 for Hlling flats rear of Harvard Cemetery, Charles- 
town, 347 

$4,400 for grading and paving yard of Lowell School-house, 
Ward 15, 536 

$27,700 on Bennet School-house, Brighton, 536 

$2,000 for land corner of Roxbury and King Sts,, 536 
Appropriations, transfers authorized — 

$700 from Reserved Fund to Common, 80 

$3,300 to Survey, etc., of Buildings, 80 

$10,000" " " to House of Correction, 80 

$5.0U0 " <• " to Bridges, 98 

$36,000 •' " " to Kil-c Department, 159 

$10,000 " " '• to Overseers of Poor, 159 

$10,000 to House of Industry, 159 

$^,000 " " " to East Boston Ferries. 1.59 

$1,730.39 from Pauper Expenses to House of Industry, 159 



$16,376.42 from widening Hanover St. No. 2 to Widening 

Hanover St.. 159 
$3,900 from Reserved Fund to Salaries, 310 
- $'),200 " ■' •• to Primary School-house, East 

Boston, 445 
$6 000 from Reserved Fund to Mt. Hope Cemetery, 446 
$27,700 from Reserved Fund to Bennett Grammar School, 

Brighton, 536 
$4,400 from Reserved Fund to Grammar School, Ward 15, 

536 
$2,000 from Reserved Fund to Cottage Place School site, 536 
$700 from Reserved Fund to Common, etc., 536 
$30,000 from Water Works to Water Works in Wards, 13, 

14.15 and 16, 566 
$20,000 from R(>served Fund to Water Works in Wards 13, 

14, 15 and 16, 566 
$1,500 from Incidental Expenses to Contingent Fund for 

Board of Aldermen, 566 
$2,500 from Reserved Fund to standpipe in Public Library, 

592 
$500 from Reserved Fund to King St. School-house, 593 
$5,000 from Reserved Fund to Armories, 616 
$1,200 from Quarantine for repairs on steamer Samuel 

Little, 631 
$2,900 from Reserved Fund to ChurchSt. District, 761 
$27,0110 from Reserved Fund to Public Buildings, 761 
$48.36 assessed tax, to Grammar School site, 761 
$77,000 from Reserved Fund to widening Shawmut Ave , 761 
$42,000 from Reserved Fund to widening Leverett St., 761 
$73,000 from lieserved Fund to widening Commerce St., 761 
$2,000 from Quarantine, for steamer Samuel Little, 761 
Army and Navy Moiiument — 

Order passed to appoint Committee, 10 
Art Museum — 

Order passed for trustees to receive bequest of Charles Sum- 
ner. 243 
Armories — 

Discussion on extra appropriations, 616 
Assessors — 

Report accepted on eligibility of E. B. Spinney and A. G. 

Wyman. 81 
Auditor of ^Vceounts — 

Estimates for 1874-5. 110 

Order passed for printing 5,.500 copies annual report, 272 

Badifes — 

Discussion on, 23 

Discus.-'ion on, and order passed for appointment of commit- 
tee to procure, 34 
Ballast Lighlers — 

Discussion on filling vacancies, and reference to next City 
Council. 255 
Barnes Mr., Ward 11 — remarks: on 

Tlie Siilary Bill, 108 

The contract for the official report, 382 

Resolutions passed relative to death of, 504 
Barry, Mr., Ward 7 — remarks: on 

Badges, 35 

Salary of Supt. Dover St. Bridge. 291 

Site for school-house, Lawrence District, 445 

Soup fur the Poor, 685 
Bixths — see Public Baths. 
Beal, Mr. Ward 16 — remarks : on 

Removal of restrictions on Boston College, 97 

The Buriill Claim, 247 

Water Supply from Charles River, 604 
Bearce, Mr., Ward 11 — remarks: on 

The Water Supply, 348 

Sudbury River scheme, 728 

Swett Street Extension, 758 
Boardman, Mr., Ward 14 — 

Elected President ^ro <fw., 363 
Remai ks : on 

Death of Charles Sumner, 128 

The appropriation Bill, 174 

Allowance to G. A. R. for Decoration Day, 243 

Salary of Supt. Dover St. Bridge, 290 

The Water Supply, 329 

Death of Councilnian Hillman B. Barnes, 504 

Investigation of assertions of jobbery, etc., 674 

Sudlmry Kiver Scheme, 761 

Thanks to President, 765 
Bonds — 

Order passed to consider expediency of converting Charles- 
town $5,000 bonds, 439 



20 



IXUEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



Report iiicxpfdiont to convert Charlostowii $3,000 bondu 
into §l.Uilil ;ic(H'i)ted, 511 
Bonds of City OilU'crs — 

Ordor piissod tor annual cxiiniiiiiition, 323 
Report accepted, correct and »uiUcient, 565 
Boston and Albany K. 11. — 

Order i)as.sed to petition for change of location, 78 
Braekett. Mr., Ward 10 — 

Kleeted Vrc^idiMit pro tern., 381 
Remarks : on 
Coiiiniitlee on Judiciarv, 12 
Bunker Hill District. 2ij 
The Salary ISili, 110, 1:',2, IGO, 178, 200 
'I'lio .\pi)ropriation I5ill, 144, lf)2 
Salaries of Kirenien. etc., i:i2, 100, 178, 200 
'I'lio Appropriatioii Bill, 144 102 
f^alaries ot Kirenien. etc.. 146 
General Annexation. 185 
rayniciil of Normal School Teacher.s, 216 
Tlic Biirrill Claim, 216, 2.)9 
Amending sect. 17 Rules and Ordcr.«, 261 
Consolidaiiiii; the Water Boards, 444 
Death of Councilman llillman H Barne.«, 50t 
Raisiiif; buildings on territory l)ounded by Wasliinsfton St., 

Harrison .Vve., Maiden atul East Canton Sts., 533 
Drainage of Mystic Basin, 617 
Water Supply. 621 

Investigation of assertions of jobbery, etc., 637 
Kmployment for the I'oor. 660 
Soup for the I'oor, 700, 7:!5 
Thanks to President, 765 
Bridges — 

Report of Commissioners of bridges between Boston and 

Cambridge, 32 
Discus>i()ii on construction of new bridge between Boston 

and Cambridge, 78 
Order passed relative to pay of Supts. of Charlestown and 

Brighton. 08 
Eastern Ave. Bridge, order passed authorizing contract for 

construction, 418 
Ordiu mcc passed for election of Supts. of Charlestown 

bridges. 423 
Superintendents appointed temporarily. 439 
Request for license to build bridge over South Bay, 408, 
Superintendents elected, 5i:i6 

Eastern Ave., order passed passed to change grade of draw. 
575 
Buildings — 

Order passed relative to giving Com. on Survey, etc., full 

powers, 32 
Order passed relative to removal of snow and ice from roofs, 

60 
Report accepted (leave to withdraw) on remonstrance against 

Boston College, 79 
Order passed relative to change of restrictions in building 

Boston College, 79 
Report relating to ordinance for three additional inspectors, 

78 
Discussion on order for removal of restrictions on Boston 

College, 97 
Vote to recede, and concur with Aldermen, relative to re- 
strictions on Boston College, 113 
Concurrence in reference of order relating to railway station 

near Chestnut-Hill Reservoir, 163 
Ordinance to amend ordinance iu relation to regulation and 

inspection, 174 
Report accepted, not competent for City Council to delegate 

powers given by statute, 174 
Order passed relating to sale of Boston Post estate, 406 
Order passed lor sale by public auction of 11 and 37 Wash- 
ington Sq., 413 
Order pas.scd for rep.iir of Armory buildingon Maverick St., 

424 
Oliver L. Shaw confiimed as Inspector, 5.30 
Report aceei>ted. leave to withdraw, on extension of building 
limits, 6nl 
Bunker-Hill District — 

Discussion on mmiing, 26 
Burditt, Mr.. Ward I(i — remarks: on 
Tbe Park question. 14 
Wilson's Hotel. Ward 19, 23, 43, 60, 79 
Bunker-Hill District, 27 
Removal of old .Mather School-house, 59 
The Salary Bill, 1U8, 132. 178, 2il4 
Adding stories to Faneuil Hall Market building, 112 
Hiring pari of .N'iies Block. 131 
Sale of lands on Kort Hill. 141 
Salaries of Firemen etc , 146 
The .Vppropriatioii Bill, 162 
Employing a City .\rchitect. 248,273 
The new engine houses, 2.19 
The Water Supply. 3J3 

Purch.aseof Beach St. Presbyterian Church. 405 
New (irammar School-house, Edgeworth St., Charlestown, 

4:;8 
Ferry passes to city employes. 446 
Transfers from Reserved Kund. 517 
Expenditures on Mather Schoolhouse, 537 



Fast driving in the streets, 589, 638 
Steam pump and lire pipe in City Hall, 591 
Staiidpipe for Public Eibrary, 592 

Caton. Mr.. Ward 11 — 

Elected to fill vacancy. 547 

Appointed on committee on Public Institutions, 549 

" " " '• Common and I'ublic Grounds, 

549 
Remarks on Water Rates, 593 
Cawlev, Mr., Ward 2 — remarks: on 
The Salary Bill, 200 
Soup for the Poor, 6J6, 684. 735 
Employment for the Poor, 660 
Killing vacancies, Inspectors of lighters, 755 
Cemeteries — 

Com. on Mt. Hope appointed for Cedar Grove, 42 

Evergreen, order passed relative to expenses. 78 

Wood lawn, order passed to cancel contract by city of 

Charlestown. 439 
Mt. Hope, — Reports accepted inexpedient to purchase addi- 
tional land, and inexpedient to grant $4,200 more for 

receiving tomb, 557 
City Charter — 

Resolve passed for commissioners to report in time to obtain 

action at present session of Legislature, 62 
City Council — 

Joint Rules and Orders of last year, as amended, adopted, 10 
Order passed relating to publishing proceedings, 325 
Discussion on the contract for the official report, and refer- 
ence 10 Special Committee, 381 
Report, no action necessary on petition of Globe Publishing 

Co. respecting award of contract, accepted, 511 
Invitation accepted to witness parade of Roman Catholic 

Temperance societies, 533 
Mr. Caton .appointed to vacancies in joint committees. 549 
Invitation accepted to attend dedication of Brighton Branch 

Library, 566 
City Engineer — 

Annual n'port, 57 

Onler passed to purchase furniture and supplies, 80 
City Hospital — 

Resignation of C. J. Proscott. trustee, accepted, 5 

Order passed to report in print, 2S1 

Gift of $1,000 from George Goodnow, 386 

A. H. Caton elected Trustee, 557 

Order passed to report iuforniation in regard to greenhouse, 

558 
Communication relating to greenhouse, 576 
City Ordinances — 

Order passed to prepare and print Digest, 439 
City Publications — 

Order passed for Ordinance relating to disposal of, 290 

Discussion on care of City Documents. 3U 

Report, discussion, and ordinance passed relating to City 

Documents. .5:33 
Order passed authorizing index to City Documents, 557 
Amendment of Ordinance referred, 576 
Ordinance passed authorizing sale, 670 
Order passed for Binding City Documents, and Proceedings 

of City CouiKtil, 764 
Order passed to pay $500 to Clerk of Council for service in 

preparing Journal, 764 
City Registrar — 

Annual report, 325 
City Solicitor — see Law Department. 
City Surveyor — 

Authorized to purchase necessary materials, 32 
City Stables — order passed to sell city stable on Polk St., 

Charlestown, 517 
Additional .shed, and storeroom authorized at South and 

West City Stables. 536 
Order passed to set apart land for Healih and Paving Dept., 

547 
Claims — 

Burrill Claim, discussion on. 24, 218. 246, 2o8 

report accepted, leave to withdraw, 134 

Order to pay $^"),00 i to Smith & McGaiagle, 80 

Order pa-sed to petition for act authorizing payment of 

certain bills, 511 
New certificate to Mary R. Gibbens, 667 
Clocks — 

Order passed to accept clock of So. Evangelical Soc, W. 

Roxbury, 38 j 
Order passed to jiay for care of clock on church of So. 

Evangelical Soc, 406 
Committees — See Introductory Note; also Special Committees. 
Common Council — 

Journal, order passed for preparing and printing, 3 

Personal explanations by the I'resiilent, 6, 13 

Request to appoint members Special Police, 2o 

Members appointi'd Special Police. 33 

Order passed changing hour of meeting to eight o'clock, 217 

Discussions on the expediency of Informal Conventions, 

234 
Order for amending sec. 17 of Rules and Orders, 251 
Communication from reporters, relating to statement con- 
cerning Globe reports, 406 



IXDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



21 



Decision on parliamentary rule, relating to adjournments 
without a. quorum, 43S, 469 

Special meeting called July 31st, 484 

Special meeting called Aug. t, 481 

Kemarks and resolutions passed relative to death of Coun- 
cilman Hillraan B. Barnes. Ward 11, 504 

Order passed to drape seat of late Mr. Barnes, 504; arrange- 
ments for funeral, 504 

Order passed notifying vacancy occasioned by decease of 
Hillman B. Barnes, 624 

Qaalilication of Mr. Caton of Ward 11, 547 
Common and Public Grounds — 

Order passed for land between Columbus Ave., Eliot St. 
extended, and Pleasant St., to be set apart as a public 
ground, 217 

Orders passed authorizing expenditures, 245 

Concurrence in amendment to order relating to vacant lot 
between Columbus Ave., Eliot St., and Pleasant St., 245 

Order to ascertain cause of destruction of trees, 261 

Discussion on removal of aspbalt, 307 

Discussion on bird-liousos, 3ii9 

Order passed to purchase bird-houses, 325 

$3,4011 additional for layiiig out, grading, etc., square on 
Commonwealth Ave., 325 

Order passed to provide music, 350; notice of non-concur- 
rence, 364 

$1,300 additional for loam, 386 

$10,000 " •' labor, 388 

$800 " " sods, 386 

$6,500 " " plants, 386 

$1,000 " " team-work, 445 

$1,200 " " Blaekstone and Franklin Squares, 445 

$2,200 for lumber, carpentering, mason-work, and painting, 
445 

$800 additional for sods, 445 

Order relating to estates adjoining Orchard Park, 448, 464 

Order passed for sate, by auction, of old greenhouse, Public 
Garden, 464 

Report and order authorizing contract for granite curb, etc., 
relerred to Committee on Finance, with leave to report 
to either branch. 464; report and orders submitted to 
Council, 464; orders reported substitnted for i)revious 
orders, and I.aid on table, 46); ordi-r to consider expe- 
diency of widening Tremont St., discussed, and laid on 
table, 465; order to consider expediency of dividing Bos- 
ton Common into house-lots discussed and indefinitely 
postponed, 465 

Order passed for improvement of Washington Park, 522 

Order passed for iron fence and improvements in square on 
Commonwealth Ave., 522 

Discussion on, and order p.assed for erection of fountain in 
Independence Sq , 522 

Order passed relative to public park on Back Bay Square, 
565 

$600 additional for team-work, 575 

$5,000 for labor on public grounds, 575 

Discussion on Greenhouse for Public Garden, 591 

$203.50 for improvement of Kagle Sq.. E. Boston, 616 

$112.50 additional for purchase of loam, 616 

$800 additional for fences, etc., 616 

$50 additional for p;agle Sq., 755 

$461,62 additional for tools and repairs, 755 

$232.30 *' '• lumber, carpentering, mason-work, 

and painting, 755 
Contingent Expenses — 

President authorized to approve bills, 11 
County of Suflblk — 

Indefinite postponement of order to place fence on roof of 
Court House, 32 

Discussion on, and order passed for, building prison car- 
riage, 418 
Crocker, Mr.. Ward 6 — remarks : on 

Bunker-Hill District, 27 

Badges, 3-3 

Wilson's Hotel, Ward 19, 44 

Xew avenue between Boston and Cambridge. 78 

Kemoval of restrictions on Boston College, 79, 97, 113 

The Salary Bill, 132. 161, 176, 197 

The W.ater Supply, 235. 275. 2it4. 334, 590, 619 

The expediency of Informal Conventions, 255 

Kemoval of restrictions on estates on So. Market St., 243 

Bird-houses for Public Grounds, 3J9 

Care of City Documents, 311 

Interest on taxes, 345 

Small-pox hospital, 364 

The contract for the official report, 382 

Consolidating Water Boards, 422, 444, 466 

Sale of city publications, !i3'i, 576 

Title to City I'roperty in Ward 19, 536 

Kmployment for the Poor, 6.')8 

Investigation of assertions of jobbery, etc., 671, 676, 6S6, 702 

Sudbury River Scheme, 727, 76t 
Crowley, Mr., Ward 7 — remarks: on 

Referring report of Fire Commissioners, 81 

Sale of lands on Fort Hill, 141 

Salaries of Firemen, etc., 146 

The Salary Bill, 175, 201 

New engine-houses, 245, 260 



Salary of Supt. of Dover Street Bridge, 290 
Site fiir School-house, Lawrence District, 4i 
Soup for the Poor, 657, 685 



5, 445 



Dacey, Mr., Ward 20 — remarks : on 

Badges, 24, 35 

Bunker-Hill District, 26 

Restrictions on Boston College, 79 

Election of Overseers of Poor, 106 

The Salary Bill, 107, 131, 160, 175 

Sale of laud to .Mass. Char. Mech. Assoc, 130 

The Appropriation Bill, 142, 162 

General Annexation, 186 

Salaries of Registrars of Voters, 244 
' Salary of Supt. Dover St. Bridge, 272, 290 

Bird-houses for Public Grounds, i509 

The contract for the official report, 382 

New Grammar School-house, Edgeworth St., Charlestown, 
438 

Consolidating Water Boards, 422, 466 

p"crry passes to city employes, 446 

Widening Tremont St. on Boston Common, 405 

Home for the Poor, 521 

Waste Water, 588 

Steam-pump and fire-pipe in City Hall, 591 

Stand-pipe for Public Library, 592 

Water R.ates, 593 

Licensing Plumbers, 605 

Soup for the Poor, 650, 685, 700, 734 

Employment for the I 'oor, 6.')9 

Investigation of assertions of jobbery, etc., 6S6, 701 

Mystic water rates, 070 

Prospect-street School-house, 703 

Sudbury River Scheme, 725, 704 

Killing vacancies, Inspectors of Lighters, 755 

Thanks to President, 765 
Day, Mr., Ward 1 — rem.arks: on 

Annual report of Overseers of Poor, 404 

Ferry passes to city employes, 446 
Dean, Mr., Ward 12 — 

Elected President ;)ro tern., 404 
Remarks : on 

Committee on Judiciary, 12 

The Water Supply, 25," 34, 61, 232, 274, 275, 233, 331, 350, 385, 
590, 618 

Removal of restrictions on land of Boston College, 97 

'J'he Salary Bill, 108, 131, lOJ, 178, 198, 249 

De.ath of Charles Snmncr, 128 

Sale of land to Mass. ( 'bar. Mech. Assoc, 130 

The .Appropriation Bill, 144 

Salaries of firemen, etc., 146 

Closing Transfers of financial year, 159 

General .\nnexation, 186 

Establishment of Hoard of Registrars of Voters, 159 

Taking gravel from Long Island, 217 

Assistance to City Solicitor, 229 

Expediency of Informal t'onventions, 234 

Salaries of Registrars of Voters, 243 

Employing a City Architect, 248 

New engine-houses, 2.59 

Ordinance relating to removal of m.anure, 263 

Consolidation of Water Boards, 440, 466 

Home for the Poor, 518, 523 

Fountain in Independence Square, 523 

The proposed Nautical School, 558, 566 

Fast driving in the streets, 665, 038 

Waste Water, 587 

Public Park, 593 

I>u!uping engines .at Lake Coehituate, 603 

Preliminary statement from Medical Commission, 6J3 

Water Supply from Charles River, 604 

Licensing I'lumbers, 605 

Dr.ainage of Mystic Rasin, 617 

Investigation of assertions of jobbery, etc., 632, 702 

Proposed new Water Board, 038 

Sudbury River Scheme, 728, 762 

Soup for the I 'oor, 734 

Swett St. Extension, 760 

Books for Law I )cpartment, 760 

'I'hanks to President, 765 
Dedh.am St. District — 

Report and order passed in new draft, 591 
Denny, Mr., Ward 9 — 

Elected President />ro tern., 10 
Remarks : on 

Soup for the Poor, 3, 631, 656 

Public Park, 3 

Wilson's Hotel, Ward 19, 23, 60 

Garden District, 27 

Investigation of assertions of jobbery, etc, 34, 674, 701 

Bemoval of old .VLather School-house, 59 

The Salary Rill, 107 

'I'he Water Supply, 232, 260, 275, .348, 620 

Expediency of inf.n-mal Conventions, 234 

Salaries of Registrars of Voters, 244 

Hospital for contagious and infectious diseases, 307, 363 

Interest on taxes, .323, 345 

Annual report of Overseers of Poor, 404 



22 



INDEX TO I'llOCEEDINGS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



I) 



Consoliilating Water BoardB, 419, 422, 440, 407 
])('atli of Councilman Uillmaii li. Uarnes, 504 
M'lislo Walor, fjSS 
Ftaiid-pipc for I'utilk; library, r)n2 
J'liinpiiiK t'Mi;iiK'K at I ake C'oohituate, 602 
J ir:iiii;iin' of M\>tic lla^in, <JI7 
KiHlilo.viiK'iit for the I'ooi, ti.VJ 
.Nonesuch I'oiid Watur SL-hfiiio, 673 
Biulbury Kiver Silioine, 704, 720 
bwt'tt St. Kxtensiun, 760 
aiiiajju — see also Sewers, 
c-tony Brook, Mayor authorized to sign agreement, 245 



Eastern H. R. — 

OnUr passed to petition for cliange of location, 78 
Elections — 

Ucpiirt and order passed accepting act establishing Regis 
trars of Voters, and regulating Voting Lists, 216 
Elections. Municipal — 

Reports of Cuniniitlees, 4 

Miotiii I>yncli superseded by "W.Elliot Woodward, 4 

lli'jjorton Ward 1') accepted, 2j 
Kmploynient for the I'oor — 

J^iscussion, and order p.assed, 658 

Notice of rejection by Board of Aldermen, 667 

Ferries — 

Order passed for new drop and tank, and for coal-shed 

216 
Order passed to repave avenues in city proper and East 

15osion. leading to North Keriy, 216 
Report, discussion, and order laid on table for free passes to 

city employes, 446 
Samuel 15. Hopkins elected Director, 547 
Fire Department — 

Report of Commissioners for Dec, 4 
Discussion on referring report of Commissioners. 81 
Order j)assed relative to increasing members. 113 
Discussion on, and ordcrpassed relative to salaries, 146 
Ordin.uice passed to amend ordinance to establish Fire De- 

l)artment, 163 
Reports o!i new engine-houses, 258 
Discussion on, and orders passed for, erection of newengine- 

lioiise on Dover and D.^rtmouili Sts.,250 
Discussion on delay (jf annual rei)ort, 4u6 
Commissioners' report for June, 423 
Report of Commissioners for August, 511 
Order passed to pay $150 to family of Mark W. Hayes, 54!) 
Order passed to pay Joseph Winlock §500 for lurnishing 

true meridian time, 587 
Reporl accepted relative to protection in Ward 17, 658 
Uil)oit of Kire (Jommi.<sioners for Nov., 686 
Flynn. Mr.. Ward 7 — remarks: on 
'l'b(' I'ark question, 14 
Wilson's Hotel, Ward 19, 23 
I'.adges, 24. 35 
The Water Supply, 25, 329 
]!nid;er liill District, 26 
(xardi'n District, 27 
Extension of Swell St., 32 

New avenue between Boston and Cambridge, 78 
liefi'iriug report of Fire Commissioners, 81 
J.'emoval of restrictions on Boston College, 97 
I'ublic urinals. OH 

■| he Salary Bill. 107. 131. 160, 175, 197 
Sale of land to Mass. Char. Mecb. Assoc, 130 
Hiiiiig pan of Niles' block, 131 
Consoliilation of Water Boards, 133, 419,444, 467 
Sale of lands on Fort Hill. 141 
The Api)ropriation Bill, 142, 162 
Taking gravel from Long Island, 218 
Salaiies of Reuistrars of Voters, 243 
Armory of Co.^F, First Reg Inf. 246 
Salary 'of Supt. Dover St. 15ridge, 272 
I'nrehase of I'.eacli St I're.sbyterian Church, 405 
A\' idening of Shawmut Ave.. 425 
Site for Sch(>ol-lioiise, Lawrence Di-strict, 425, 445 
Widening of Tremont St., on Boston Common, 465, 548 
Sale of city pul>Iications, 534 
Fast-driving in the street, 565, 589, 638 
I'ublic Bark, 593 

Water supply from Charles River, 603 
Invesligaiion of assertions ot jobljery, etc., 6-32, 661 
Sou]) for llie Boor, 631, 054, l)S'4, 700 
Employment for the I'oor, 660 
Widen'ing School St., 686 
Sudbury River Scheme, 725 
Filling vacancies. Inspectors of Lighters, 755 
Swett SI E.\lension, 760 
Fort Hill Property — 

J)iscussion on, and order passed to sell, 141 
Order passed to ex.imiiie title, and report conditions city 
inav prescribe, 468 
Fort Hill Wharf- 
Order passed to place in charge of Raving Department, 368 
Fourlhof.July- 

Order passed for Celebrating, 292 
Discussion on appropriations, 310 



Concurrence with Board i-f Aldermen in appropriating 
$20,000, 324 
Funds — 

Order passed on disposal of Brighton and Charlestown In- 
vested Funds, 325 

Report accepted of Treasurer's Accounts of Gibson and 
Stovigliton Trust Funds, 381 

Order passed relative to trustees of Charlcstown Toor's 
Fund, 511 

Report relating to West Roxbury funds appropriated in aid 
of Eliot School. 511 

Report accepted, inexpedient to change custody of Cbarles- 
town Boor Fund, 547 

G. A. R.— 

Invitation from Post 26 for Decoration Day, accepted, 218 
Discussion on allowing each I'ost $200 for Decoration Day, 

244 
Order passed to allow &200 to N. P. Banks Array and Navy 
Veteran Corjjs for Decoration Day, 257 
Garden District — 

Discussion on naming, 27; indefinitely postponed, 62 

n.impden St. District — see Swett St. District. 
Harbor — 

Discussion on, and order passed for report on taking gravel 

from Long Island, 217 
Communications from Mayor, Harbor Commis.sioners, and 

General Thom. relating to taking of gravel, 248 
Report accepted relative to removal of gravel from Long 

Island. 257 
Order passed to pay Commonwealth for tide water dis- 
placed, 533 
Harringion, Mr , Ward 8 — remarks : on 
The Salary Bill, 109, 132, 197 
The Appropriation Bill, 143 
Salaries of Firemen, etc., 146 
Fourth July, 310, 324 

Widening Tremont St. on Boston Common, 465 
Health, Board of — 

Communication relating to public urinals, 445 
Order passed authorizing locations of public urinals, 464 
Appointment of Henry G. Crowell coutirmed, vice Albert 
T. Whiting resigned, 700 
Health Department — 

Sup't authorized to purchase hay and grain, etc., 32 
Contract authorized for removal of house oflal, East Boston, 

and \V . Koxbury, 272 
Order passed to report action taken in regard to public 

urinals, 3.50 
Report and ordinance to amend ordinance relating to public 
liealth, Indefiiiilely postponed, 363 
Home for tlie I'oor — see Public Institutions, 
llunnewcll, Mr., Ward 19 — remarks: on 
Wilson's Hotel, Ward 19, --3, 43 
The Water supply, 61 

Railway station near Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 133 
'J'lie Appropriation Bill. 142 
Sudbury River Scheme, 729 

Kent, Mr., Ward 21 — rem.arks : on 

Bunker-Hill District, 26 

The Salary Bill, 108, 1:31 

The Appropriation Bill, 174 

The Water Supply, 233, 231, 350, 364 

Allowance for Decoration Day, 243 

Emploj'ing a City Architect, 273 

New Grammar School-house, Edgeworth St., Charlest'n, 439 

Celebration of 17th June, 274 

General Annexation, 385 

Death of t'ouucilmau Hillman B. Barnes, 504 

Investigation of assertions of jobbery, etc., 632 

Soup for the Poor, 685 

Sudliury River Scheme, 704, 730 
Kimball, Mr., W^ard 6 — remarks: on 

Badges, 23, 34 

AVilson's Hotel, Ward 19, 44 

The Salary Bill, 108, 131, 178, 202 

Sale of lands on Fort Hill, 141 

Expediency of Informal Conventions, 234 

The Burrill Claim, 246, 259 

The Water Supply, 279 

I'urchaso of Beaeli St. Prcsh3-terian Church, 405 

Consolidation of Water Boards, 444 

Home for the Poor, 520, 523 

Titl(! to City Property in Ward 19, 537 

Fast-driving in the streets, 565, 589 

Standpipe for Public Library, 590, 592 

Vacancies in Coehituate Water Board, 616 

Investigation of assertions of jobbery, etc, 636, 671, 701 

Soup for the Poor, 606 

Swett St. Extension, 757 
King Kalakaua — 

Order passed for reception, 725 

Lamp Department — 

Order p.-issed to set apart portion of city's land on Albany 

St., 323 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



23 



Law Departraent — 

City Solicitor, Annual report, 57 

Order passed relative to semi-annual reports, 78 

Report accepted, inexpedient to dispense with semi-annual 
reports, 106 

Reconsideration relating to semi-annual reports, and recom- 
mittal, 135 

Order passed to furnish temporary assistance to City Solici- 
tor, 229 

Order passed to transfer Mass. Reports fi-om Dorchester to 
City Solicitor's office, 244 

Discussion on, and order passed relative to city property in 
Ward 19, 536 

Order jjassed to purchase law hooks, 760 
Leach, Mr., Ward lu^ remarks: on 

Conveyance of land to Mass. Char. Mech. Asso. for site for 
building, 131 

The Salary Bill, 132,175 

The Appropriation Bill, 162 

Expediency of Informal Conventions, 235 

Salary of Siip't Dover St. Bridge, 290 

The contract for the official report, 3S3 

Swett St. Extension, 769 
Legislative Matters — 

Order passed for committee to look after all acts for annexa- 
ation, etc., 97 
Loans — 

$100,000 for Devonshire St. extension, 78 

$200,000 for extension of Washington St. and Haymarket 
Sq., 97 

Rcport relating to loan of $1,620,000 for Burnt District, 113 

$1,020,000 for Burnt District Loan, 159 

$200,000 for Korlhampton St. District, 174 

$60,000 for Water for Wards 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 and 19,291, 307, 
325 

$4,000,000 in anticipation of taxes, 347 

$194,000 for widening Beach St., 445 

$57,000 additional for Street Improvement Loan, Beach St., 
445 
Long, Mr., Ward 22 — remarks : on 

Bunker-Hill District, 26 

Allowance for Decoi-ation Day, 243 

The contract for the official report, 383 
Loring, Mr., Ward 12 —remarks ; on 

New avenue between Boston and Cambridge, 79 

The Salary Bill, 108, 161, 201 

Police Boat, 131 

Employing a City Architect, 248, 273 

Salary of Snp't Dover St. Bridge, 272, 290 

Interest on taxes, 324, 346 

Home for the I'oor, 521, 523 

Extension of East Lenox St., 533 

Investigation of assertions of jobbery, etc., 637, 671 

Employment for the Poor, 660 

Soup for the I'oor, 735 

Swett St. Extension, 759 

Mayor — 

Requested to furnish copy of Inaugural Address for print- 
ing. 3 
Report on disposiiion of topics in Inaugural Address, 11 
Authorized to pay execulions and judgments of courts, 13 
Communication on taking gravel from l^oiig Island, 24S 
Communication on work under contract for Water Supply, 

575 
Communication transmitting statement from Medical Com- 
mission, 602 
Martin, Mr., Ward 7 — remarks: on 

Site for School-house in Lawrence District, 425, 445 
Militia — 

I'ayment of certain bills incurred in 1873, authorized, 34 

Co. F., First Keg., $25 for rent of armory, 98 

Co. 1, Ninth Keg.. i.S;).40 for taxes paid in 1873. 98 

Co. Or, Ninth Keg.. $700 per annum fur rent of armory. 98 

Co. C, First Bat. Cav., $800 per annum for rent of armory, 

98 
Co. K. First Keg., rent of former armory, discontinued, and 

$1,600 aliov.'ed for I'ent in Washington Hall, 112 
Co. D, First Bat. Inf., rent of old armory, discontinued, and 

$1,000 per annum allowed for rent of new, 141 
First Bat. Inf., ;S450 for rent of head-quarters, 148 
Co. A. First Bat. Inf., rent in Minol Hall, discontinued, 

and $l,t)Ou allowed for rent in Concoid Hall. 148 
First Co. of Cadets, $500 to repair and furnish armory, 174 
Co. H. Fifth Keg., repairs authorized. 174 
Repairs authorized in buildingon Maverick St., East Boston, 

174 
First Bat. Light Art., $150 for rent of head-quarters, 174 
Ancient and Honorable Artillery authorized to fire salutes, 

244 
Co. K. Ninth Reg., order passed to discontinue rent of ar- 
ninry in Thiid St., and to nilow $S6u peraniuiin for rent, 
ami $250 to furnisli nrniory 143 Broadway, 245 
Co. C, Fust 13nt. Cav., order passed to tit up armory, 245 
Co. F, First Keg. Inf , discussion, and order passed to fur- 
nish armory, 245 
Amendment of order to take old High School for armory, 311 



Co. I, First Keg., order passed to discontinue rent of armory, 
344. 

Co. (i. Ninth Reg Inf., $225 to fit up armory, .385 

Co. H, Fifth Keg. Inf.. $i25 to fit up armory, ^85 

Fifth Keg. Inf ."$ 300 per annum allowance for rent of head- 
quarters, 405 

Co. D, Fiflli Keg. Inf., $225 for repairing and fittiisg up 
armory, 446 

Co. C, Fourth Bat. Inf, $10 for rent. 446 

Co. D. Fourth Bat. Inf., $100 fir fitting up. 44S 

Co. 11, Fifth Keg, Inf, $50 additional to fit up and repair 
ill mory. 469 

Report inexpedient to grant petition of Co. A, First Bat, 
Light Art , M. V. M.. for new armory, 523 

Co. A. Fourth B.it. Inf, order passed for repairing and fur- 
nishing armory, 5 i6 

Co. 1. Fii-.st Keg. Inf., order passed for repairing and fur- 
nishing armory, 536 

Co. B, First Keg , and Co. H, Ninth Reg., order passed for 
repairing and furiiisliing armory, 536 

Co. B. Ninth Keg., order passed for repairing and furnish- 
ing armory. 536 

Report accepted, inexpedient to hire drill-room, 575 

First Bat. Cav., head-quarters discontinued, and $450 allowed 
for rent at Boylston Hall. 686 

Fourth Bat. Inf. — Keport accepted, leave to withdraw, on 
petition for furniture, 725 

Co. B, Ninth Reg., $50 for repairing and fitting up armory, 
755 

Co. A, 'First Reg., $275 for rent of armory, 755 
Minors —regulations of sales by, 10 
Minot, Mr., Ward 17 —remarks: on 

Committee on Judiciary, 12 

Badges, 35 

The Watt r Supply, 61. 260, 333, 367 

The Salary Bill, 108, 2)4 

Establishment of Board of Registrars of Voters, 159 

The Appropriation Bill, 162 

Anne.xution of Bi'ookline, 183 

General Annexation, 186 

Bird-houses for Public Grounds, 309 

Interest on taxes, 346 

Contract for the olKcial report. 384 

(!onsoiidating Water Boards, 422 

Water Waste, 588 

Water Kates, .593 
Morse. Mr.. Ward 13 — remarks: on 

Bunker Hill District, 26 

The Salary Bill, 202 
Municipal Register — 

Order passed fur preparing and printing, 3 
Mystic Water Works — see Water. 

N. Y. and N. E. R. R. — 

Order passed authorizing use of land near Chestnut-Hill 

Reservoir for railway station, 33 
Report and order relating to station near Chestnut-Hill 

Reservoir, 112 
Order passed relating to grade at Swett St. Crossing, 418 
Northampton St. District — 

Committee vested with powers relating to Suffolk St. Dis- 
trict, 32 
Report and order passed to remove buildings, etc., 97 
Order passed relating to contract for filling, 106 
Order passed to contract for tilling, 112 
Contract for filling authorized, 188 
Order passed authorizing Phineas E. Gay to lay down tracks 

for filling, 197 
Order passetl appointing special watchman, 216 
Order passed appointing Sup't of work, 216 
Order passed for contracts to be made for raising, moving, 

and underpinning buildings, 216 
Order passed to furnish extra lights, 216 
Committee authorized to expend sums not exceeding $1,000, 

228 
Noyes, Mr., Ward 5 — remarks : on 
The Bun ill Claim, 24, 258 
The Water Supply, .34, 275 
Referring report of Fire Commissioners, 81 
The Salary Bill, 131, 178, 200 
Dividing Boston Common, 465 
Sale of city publications, 535 
Vacancies in Cochituate Water Board, 616 
Water Supply, 617, 619 
Sudbury Kiver Scheme, 732 
Soup for the Poor, 734 
Nuisances — 

Order passed to fill up hole at corner of Boston and Hamlet 

Sts., Ward 16, 512 

Ordinances — see City Ordinances. 
Overseers of Poor — ■ 

Minority report on nomination, 80 

Discussion on reports of Nominating Committee, and elec- 
tion, 98 

Letter f om Mrs. M'arner, and election, 100 

Annual report, discussion on, 404 



1 



H 



INDEX TO rUOCEEDIXGS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



Pago, Mr., Ward 9 — vcniarks : on 
The Salaiy Bill, 132, 197 
t^alo of hiiuls (in Flirt Hill. 141 
I'aynK'iit (if Xoniial Siliool Teachers, 216 
Armory of Co. K, KirKt lieg. Inf., 245 
liitereHt on taxes. :5'i:J. 344 
New Grammar School-house, Edgeworth St., Charlestown, 

439 
Extension of Swett St., 7.JG 
Pcabdily, .Mr.. Ward 9 — remarks: on 
Badges. 24 

New avenue between Boston and Cambridge, 79 
Bale of lands on Fort Hill, 141 
The Salary Bill, 110, 101, 176, 199 
Kxpedieney of Informal Conventions, 235 
New eiis^iiie-housis. 2M 
Consolidating Water Hoards, 466 
Home for the I'oor, .521 
Sale of city publieations, .535 
Biifelow .>^chool Distriet, .538 
W.ater Supply, 27.5, .590, 618 
W.ater Suiiply from Cliarlcs River, 603 
Investif^ation of assertions of jobbery, etc., 633, 703 
Soup for tlie I'oor, G57 
Nonesuch I'ond Water Scheme, 676 
Sudbury Itiver Sciieme, 704, 728, 761, 764 
Pease, Mr , Ward 1 —remarks: on 

TIk^ Water Supply. 25. 31, 231, 250, 260, 274, 32?, 350, 385, .590 
Wilson's Hotel, Ward 19, 61 
The Salary Bill. i:!2 

Consolidation of Water Board.*, 133. 418. 444 
Railway station near Chesttuit-Hill Reservoir, 135 
The .Appropriation Hill, 142 
Tlie Expediency of Ijifurrnal Conventions, 234 
Salaries of Registrars of V'oters, 244 
Eoiirtli of .Inly. 324 
Home fur tlie I'oor, 520 
I'umping engines at Lake Cochitu.ite, 601 
Coininuiiication from B. F. Butler, ft31 
Water Supply fnnn Charles River, 603 
Investigation of assertions of jobbery, etc., 634, 673 
I'roposed new Water Board, 638 
Nonesuch I'ond Water Scheme, 674 
Soup for tlie I'oor, 700 

Filling vacancies. Inspectors of Ligliters, 755 
Sudbury lliver Sclieme, 7(51 
Perkins. Mr., Ward 10 — remarks: on 
Badges, 21 

Bunker-Hill District, 24 
The tJarden District, 27 
Election of Overseers of Poor, 98, 105 
The Appropriation Bill, 142, 163 
The Salary Hill. 101. 19J 
General .Vuncxalion. 1S6 
The Water Supply. iXi, :349. ,590 
Expediency of liifdrinal Conventions, 2.35 
Asphalt on the tJomnion, 201, 307 
Hospital for contagions and infectious diseases, 307 
The contract for the otlicial report, 383 
Building prison carriage. 418 
Conso.iilaliiig the Water Boards, 444 

Widening ot Tremont St., on 15oston Common, 464, 465, 548 
Nuisance at corner of Hamlet St., 512 
Home for the I'oor, 521, 523 
Fountain in Independence .Square, 522 
Greenliouse on I'ublic Garden, 591 
I'ublic i'ark, 593 

Water Supply from Charles liiver, 603 
Extra Appropriations for Armories, 616 
Fast-driving in the streets, 038 
Soup for tlie I'oor, 054, 684, 700, 7.34 
Koiu'sncli I'ond Water .Sciieme, 675 
l»wett St. ICxtension, 757 
Thanks to President, 765 
Police — 

Order passed for monthly payment to members in Brigliton, 

Cliarlestown and West Roxbury. 10] 
Order pass d relative to police lioat, 131 
Autliorized free use of ferries. 405 
Order passed relative to confining more th.an one person in 

cell, 001 
Keport accepted relating to confinement of more than one 
person in cell, 701 
Poor — see Soup for the Poor; Home for the Poor; Employment 

for the I 'oor. 
Powers, Mr., Ward 4 — remarks: on 
Bunker-Hill District, 26 
The S.dary Bill, 19.) 
The contract for the ( flicial report, 383 
Praj', Mr., Ward 21 — remarks: on 

Armory of Co. 1'', Fir.-t Keg. Inf., 245 
Celeliratiiiii of I'lli .Tune, "274 
Extra .Vppropriations for Armories, 616 
Printing — isec also (.'ity I'ublications). 

Order passed for l.OuO additional copies of the Sumner me- 
morial, 2iil ; noii-conciirretice of .VIderineii. 321 
Keport accepted, leave to withdraw on petition of Porter & 
Coates, i'liiladelphia, 010 



Public Baths — 

Order passed authorizing repairs and maintenance of free 

public b.itliing-honses, 244 
Order passed aulhurizing hiring of land at end of L. St., 325 
Act autliorizing public baths accejited, 755 
Public Buildings — 

City Hall — order passed toconsider expediency of elevators, 
113 

order passed for elevator, 217 

order pa.ssed to cliarge expense of elevator to special 

appropr ation, 257 

repairs authorized, 439 

order passed autliorizing repairs and changes in heat- 
ing apparatus, 404 

report and orders relative to ventilation recommitted 

with instructions to invite proposals, 404 

order passed for steam iiump, 522 

discussion on connecting steam-pump and fire pijie, 591 

order passed for connections witli Bteaui-i>ump and lii'e- 

pipe, (502 
Town Hall, W. Roxbury, order p.assed relative to leasing. 10 
Order passed authorizing use of Westerly H.ill, Ward 17, 12 
Discussion on and order passed relative to Wil-oii's Hotel, 

Ward 19. 23 
Order passed for necessary repairs and cleaning. 26 
Order passed for Com. to report on more room for city busi- 
ness, 42 
Discussion on Wilson's Hotel, Ward 19, 43 
Order passed relating to legality of purchase of Wilson's 

Hotel, Ward 19, 44 
Order passed to coiisidi r expediency of adding one or more 

stories to Quincy Hall Nlarket, 44 
Communication from City Solicitor in regard to Wilson's 

Hotel, Ward 19, and discission on vacating. GO 
Wilson's Hotel, Ward 19, order passed for occupant to va- 
cate, 79 
Order passed relative to expediency of employing perma- 

i.ent arcliitect, 81 
Discussion on adding one or more stories to Faneuil-llall 

Market. 112 
Order passed to name Town Hall in W. Ro.xbury, Curtis 

Hall, 130 
Order passed to lease house No. 30 Pemberton Sq.. 145 
Order passed aulhoriziiig portion of Town Hall, Brighton, 

to lie fitted up for Police Station, 174 
Report and discussion on employing architect and draughts- 
men, 248 
Charlcstowii City TIall, order passed for alterations to accom- 
modate brancli of Public Library, 257 
Discussion on, and order passed to empl(>y, permanent City 

Architect and draughtsmen, 273 
Order passed to make alterations No. 30 Pemberton Sq. . 274 
Report accepted, inexpedient to enlarge Faneuil-llall Market 

building. 3;8 
Order passed to grade yard and pave sidewalks of Hook and 

Ladder House No. 4, 418 
Order p.issed for repairs on Harbor Master's office, 438 
Fancuil Hall, order passed for rejiairs, 439 
Order passed to report on expediency of introducing stand- 
pipes into scliool buildings, 464 
No 30 Pemlierton Sq,, order passed for repairs, 468 
Order passed for care of building, 30 I'cmberton Sq., 522 
Report accepted, inexpedient to provide ward-rooms, 557 
Order passed tiuthorizing fitting up room in Court House 

for temporary retention of insane, 557 
Order passed authorizing suitable ward-rooms, in Wards 20, 

21 and 22, 6(56 
Wardrooms established, 566 
Order passed for removal of old engine house in rear of 

Town Hall, Brighton, 566 
Report accepted, ward-rooms in control of ward officers on 

election days, 601 
Sale autliorized on city lot, King St., 616 
Public Institutions — 

Ortler ptissed to place Charlcstown Almshouse in care of 

Directors of I'ublic Institutions, 23 
Austin Farm, order passed to place in charge of Directors, 

130 
Home for the Poor, report on plans, and orders reported, 423 
order passed for erection on Austin Farm, and for pro- 
viding mcaiis. 445 
Order passed requesting opinion of Directors on building a 

Home for poor on Austin Farm, 511 
Home for the I'oor, discussion on recommitting rcjiort of 
Directors relating to site, and recommittal, 518 
Public Lands — 

I'oorhouse Farm. Ward 19, order p.asscd to place in clnirge 

of Com on Lands. 42 
Wharf on Medf inl St., and all public lands and buildings in 
annexed districts, placed in care of Com. on I'ublic 
Lands. GO 
Disci! sion on negotiation with Mass. Char. Mcch. .\ssoe.. 130 
Order passed for purchase of land rear of Lowell School- 
house, 325 
Concurrence in amendment relating to sale of buildings on 

Eliot and I'leasaiit Sts., 439 
Order passed for sale of old engine house lot. Centre St., 
W. Roxburv, 575 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



25 



Communication from Assistant City Solicitor on title to city 
property in Ward 19, 632 
Public urinals — sco Health (Board of). 
I'ublic Library — 

Order passed to report expediency of local boards for branch 
libraries, 219 

Order passed to build addition to accommodate Department 
of Patents, 215 

Order pussei for painting and cleaning, 464 

Order passed to provide branch in Ward 16, 522, 558 

Report referred relating to stand-pipe, 576 

Keport on stand-pipe for I'ublic Library, 589, 590 

Discussion and order passed to connect stand-pipe, 592 

Order passed to continue payment of salary of late Wm. 
A. Wheeler, 616 

Report accepted, inexpedient, relative to Woloott Estate, 725 

Order passed to hire rooms for iSouth Boston Branch Li- 
brary, 755 

Report accepted, no action necessary on Local Boards for 
Branch Libraries, 761 
Public Park — 

Order relating to, introduced. 3; discussion, 13 

Election of Commissioners, 106 

Commissioners at large appointed, 159 

Discussion on and order passed to petition, 593 

Report of Park Commissioners, 667 

Order to print 1,000 copies additional, 669 
Putnam, Mr.. \Vard 15 — remarli.s : on 

Badges, .35 

New avenue between Boston and Cambridge, 79 

The Appropriation Bill, 144, 162 

Salaries of i<'iremen, etc., 146 

The Salary Bill, 164 

Annexation of Brookline, 183 

General Annexation, 185 

The Water Supply. 23?, 292, 500 

Widening of Sliawmut Ave.. 424 

Consolidating Water Boards, 421, 444, 467 

Extra Appropriations for Armories, 616 

Vacancies in Coehituate Water Board, 616 

Drainage of Mystic Bas3n, 617 

Investigation of assertions of jobbery, etc., 636, 661, 671, 701 

Fast driving, 638 

Soup for the Poor, 657, 684, 700 

Emijloyment for the Poor, 658 

Budbury Kiver Scheme, 703 

Swett St. Extension, 75S 

Thanks to the President, 764 

Registrars of Voters — 

Discussion on accepting act establishing Bo.ard, 159; Re- 
port and act accepted. 216 

Order passed authorizing $500 for clerical assistance, 512 
Rewards — 

$500 for information, etc., relating to abduction of Katie 
Mary Cnrran, 174 
Rules and Orders — 

Special Committees to prepare, 3 

Of City Council of 1873, temporarily adopted, 3 

Of Common Council of 1873, temporarily adopted, 3 

Pocket edition authorized. 3 

Of last year, as amended, adopted, 11 

Salaries — 

Order passed fixing salary of additional Assistant City 

Messenger at $400, 81 
Action on Salary Bill, :07, 131 
Second report, and action thereon, 160, 175, 197 
Vote to recede and concur on order relating to salaries of 

officers of Fire Department, 163 
Order passed relative to fixiiig salaries of Registrars of 

Voters, 217 
Com. of conference appointed on salary of Supt. of Streets, 

228 
Order passed fixing salaries of Registrars of Voters and 

Assistants, 243, 273 
Conference report accepted relating to salary of Supt. of 

Streets, 249; order passed, 257 
Discussion on order to pay Supt. of Dover St. Bridge $300 

additional, 272 
Order passed establishing salaries of draw tenders of North 

Harvard St. Bridge, Cambridge St. and Western Ave. 

Bridges, 290 
Discussion on, and order indefinitely postponed to pay Supt. 

of Dover St. Bridge $.300 additional, 290 
Order passed fixing salaries of Supts. of bridges, 439 
Order passed to increase salary of chief clerk in City Regis- 
trar's office for extra service, 464 
Schools — 

Order passed for necessary furniture, repairs, and cleaning. 

26 
Order passed to provide temporary accommodations for 

Lewis School, 42 
Order passed to furnish ad(3itional accommodations for 

Grammar School pupils, Lawrence District, 44 
Report accepted, inexpedient to enlarge Primary School 

lot, Lexington St., 44 



Report accepted, leave to withdraw, Meigs's school-desk, 
44 

Old Mather School-house, discussion on removal, 59; re- 
port amended and accepted, 80 

Order passed to provide temporary accommodations for 
Union St. and Rockland Primary Schools, Brighton, 
141 

Order passed to pay salaries of teachers in Normal School, 
and incidental expenses of Com.. 216 

Roxbury High School building, order passed for altering 
and enlarging, 245 

Quincy St , Ward 14 order passed for erection of Primary 
School-house. 245 

Ordinance referred relating to punishment of truants, 274 

Report accepted on Charle.-<towu Infant School, no authority 
to appropriate money, 201 

Order passed to furnish suitable room for drawing in Girls' 
High School-house, 325 

Order pa.ssed to provide accommodations for drawing-class 
instruction in City Hall, Charleslown, 385 

East Boston I'rescott School-house, alterations authorized, 
405 

Lawrence District, order passed to purchase site for Prima- 
ry School-house. 405 

Prescott, Charlestown, order passed to pi'ovide additional 
Primary School accommodations, 406 

Order passed to purchase site for new Grammar School- 
house, I'rospect St.. Charlestown, 407 

Order passed to erect Grammar School-house on Prospect 
SU, Charlestown. 428 

Discussion on reconsidering order to purchase site in Law- 
rence District, 426; reconsideration refused, 445 

Comins District, order passed to purchase land for Primary 
School-house. 438 

Dudley School-house, order passed for repairs, etc.. 438 

Discussion on, and order amended and passed relative to. 
erection of new Grammar School-house, Edgeworth St., 
Charlestown, 4 18 

Order passed to purchase site for Primary School-hous'^, 
Gibson District. 446 

Order passed to consider expediency of establishing fiee 
naval school (with instruction to report by October 1), 
446 

Order passed authorizing erection of Primary School-house 
on Koxbury and King Sts , Ward 15. 464 

Gibson School District, order passed for erection of Prima- 
ry School-house, 464 

Order passed to erect Primary School-house, Lawrence 
District, 468 

Matlier School-house, statement of cost, 537 

Discussion on primary accommodations, Bigelow District, 
538 

Report on proposed Nautical School, and opinion from City 
Solicitor, 547 

Order passed to fit up bath-house, Cabot St., for evening 
school, 557 

Order passed to fit up ward-room in Wells School-house for 
evening school, 557 

Report inexpedieut to furnish additional accommodations 
for Bigelow School District, 557 

Discussion on the proposed Nautical School, 558, 566 

Order passed for temporary accommodations for evening 
schools, 565 

King St. School-house, order passed appropriating $500 ad- 
ditional for land, 593 

Order passed relating to evening drawing scliool, E. Boston, 
602 

Older passed providing for eveuing drawing school at East 
Boston, 616 

Report and orders passed relating to Prospect St. School- 
house, Charlestown, 703 

Report accepted relating to Truants, 761 

Report accepted relating to Kindergarten School, 761 
Sealers Weights and Measures — 

Annual report. 10 

Order passed for Mayor to petition for changes in law, 78 

Order passed for locating office rutside of City Hall, 197 

Ordinance passed to amend ordinance relating to, 257 
Seventeenth of June — 

Order relating to, 274 

Order passed for celebrating, 291 
Sewers — see also Drainage — 

Order passed to pay $35,000 to Central Whf. Corporation. 290 
Stony Brook, order passed to petition for leave to deepen, 78 
Shaw, Mr., Ward 5 — 

Address on c lUing Council to order for organization, 1 
Remarks : on 

Soup for the Poor, 3 

Committee on Judiciary, 12 

Wilson's Hotel, Ward 19, 23. 43, 60, 79 

Badges. 24, 35 

Water Supply, 25, 232. 275, 293, 349, 366, 590, 617, 620 

Bunker-llill District, 26 

Garden District, 27 

Additional stories to Quincy-H.all Market, 44, 112, 368 

City Charter Coniniission. 62 

New avenue between Boston and Cambridge, 78 



20 



INDEX TO PKOCEEDIXGS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



Rcfervimj report of Fire Commissioners, 81 
Klectioii of ()vcrrteer« of Poor, 9S, 106 
Tiie Salary 15111, lu7. i:jl, Hii), 176, 197 
])(Mlli of bharU-H Siimiier, 1211 

Sak'of land to Mass. Cliar. Meoli. Asfoc, ITO 

Hallway station near (Jlu'stinit-lIiU Ueservoir, 13'5 

Sale of laiids on Fort Hill, 141 

The ApproiM-iation Bill, 141, 162 

Salaries of Kireinen. etc.. 146 

Closing? 'I'raiisferM of financial year. LW 

Establishment of lioanl of Regisirars of Voters, 159 

Annexation of Brooklinc, 1S3 

General Aniie.xation. 18') 

Personal explanation relating to Wilson's Hotel, Ward 19 
187 

Taking Kravel from Lons? Island, 218, 248 

Assistance to (Jity Solicitor, 229 

Kxpediency of Informal Conventions, 23S 

Itemoval of restrictions on estates on South Market St., 213 

Balaries of IJeijistrars of Vo'ers, 244 

tiaiary of Snpt. of Streets, 249 

Kew engine-houses, 2VJ 

Balarv of Snpt. of I)ov<-r St Bridge, 291 

PiiiUinff addui nal c(i])ies Sumner Memorial, 291, 324 

Ilenioval of asphall fr(jm (Jonnnon, 307 

Hospital for contagious and infectious diseases, 337, 363 

l?ird-lionses, for Pul)lic Grounds, 3u9 

Fourth July, 310 

(-areof(;ity Documents, 311 

The Park question. 313 

Interest on taxes. 3i!. 344 

Contract for the oHicial report. 383 

Annual report of Overseers of Poor, 404 

Annual report of Fire Department, 40J 

HuiUling i)rison cai riage, 418 

(,'onsolidaling Water Boards, 420, 467 

Adjournments without a quorum, 43S, 469 

Pauper graves at Mount Ilope, 4.i9 

Widi-nifig Treniont St. on Boston Common. 465 

I>iath of Couneihnan Hilhnan B. Barnes, 504 

Transf rs from Hosi-rved Fund, 517 

Home for the Poor, 521 

Sale of City Publications, rm, 576 

'iitle to City Property in Ward 19, 536 

Waste Water, 587 

Standpipe for Public Library, 590, 592 

Gricnliousc on Public t}arden, 591 

Pumping engines at Lake Cochituate, 601 

Preliminary statement from Medical Commission, 603 

Water Supply frovn Charles Iliver, 603 

Licensing Plumbrrs, 605 

Vacancies in Coehituat(? Water Board, 616 

Drainage of Mystic Ba«in, 017 

Communication from B F. Butler, 631 

Investigation of assertions of jobbery, etc., 633, 660, 670, 676, 
686 

Poup for the Poor, 056, 701, 734 

Employment for the Poor, 658 

Sudhury River scheme, 703, 733 
Shepard. I'.dward <). (Presidenl of Council) — 

Elected President, 1 

Address on accepting ofllce of President. 1 

Remarks on death of (Iharles Simmer, 128 

Death of Councilman Ilillman B. Barnes, 504 

Response to vote of thanks, 705 
Shurtleff, Nathaniel B.— 

Proceedings on death of, 573 
Sibley, Mr , Ward 20 — remarks : on 

iUiiiki'r-llill District, 26 

Removal of re-lrictions on Boston College. 97 

Thi' Salary Bill, lo9. 197, 2ul 

Allowance {i,v Decoration Day, 243 

Soup for the Poor, 684 
Small-pox — 

Discussion on purchasing site for hospital, 307 

Discussion on, and oder passed authorizing purchase of, 
site and buildings for hospital, 36:i 
Smith, Jlr., Ward 10 — remarks : on 

Referring report of Fire Conunissioners, 81 

Personal explanation relating to Fire Commissioners, 97 

The Salary Bill, 109 

The Appropiiation Bill, 145 

New engine-houses, 26) 
Poldieis' Monument — see Army anil Navy Monument. 
Soup for the Poor — 

Order introduced and laid on t.ablo, 3 

Discussion and vote to refer to special committee, 65t 

Non-eoncurnniee, and adherence to reference to Joint 
Special Com., 667 

Discussion, recession, order amended and passed, 0S4 

Discussion, adherence, and Conference Committee .appointed, 
700 

Report accepted, no action necessary on petition of Lydia 
M. Warner, 725 

Report of Conference Committee accepted, discussion, and 
concurrence, 734 
South Boston Flats — 

Order passed to pay bill of 1872, 368 



Order passed for Com. on Harbor to confer and report on 
use and occupation, 512 
Si)ecial Committees — 

On extension of new Post office, 5 
Sprague, Mr., Waid 4 — remarks: on 

New avenue between Boston and Cambridge, 78 

Contract for the oflieial report, 381 

Sale of City Publications, 535 

Soup for the Poor, 655 
Stables — 

Order passed for sale by auction of old City Stables, High- 
lands, 464 
Streets — 

Order passed relative to laying out Parker St., 11 

Rei)ort of Committee relating to Parker St. and Boylston 
St., 33 

Order passed to fill land on Canal St. rear of Harvard Ceme- 
tery, Ward 22, 141 

Order passed to prepare plans for construction of Swett St., 
197 

Order passed for sale by public auction of land cor. Eliot and 
Pleasant Sts., 217 

Discussion on, and order passed cancelling, conditions im- 
posed on estates in So. Market St., 243 

Order passed to purchase estate of John Haven for extending 
Clifton St., 368 

Discussion on, and order passed for widening Shawmut Ave., 
between Dudley and Guild Sts., 424 

Report and order relating to Street Improvement Loan, 
Beach St., 424 

Order passed to place land purchased for extension of Clifton 
St. in charge of Com. on Paving, 468 

Beach St., report and order passed for widening, 385 

Brattle St., oider passed to widen, 4^!9 

Leverett St., order passed for widening, .344 

Marcella St., order passed to consider expediency of laying 
out, 272 

Madison Place, order passed for notice to tenants to quit, 406 

South St., order passed to widen, 439 

Washington St., report and order for widening opposite 
Vernon St., 423 

order p.assed to widen part formerly Guild Row, 464 

Order passed to grade city stable lot on Highland St., 522 

Order passed for improvement of lot bounded by Eagle, 
Trenton and Prescott Sts., East Boston, 622 

Tlioriidike St.. order pa-sed for laying out from Wash. St. 
to Harrison Ave., 633 

East Lenox St., discussion on. and order passed for laying 
out. and extendingto Harrison Ave ,5:33 

School St.. order passed to consider expediency of widen- 
ing, 638 

Discussion on proposed widening of Trcmont St., 548 

North Centre St , order passed for wideiiing, 565 

Discussion on fast driving, and recommittal. 665 

Ordinance in new draft reported, and substituted on fast 
driving, 589 

Ordinance passed relative to fast driving, 591 

OnUr passed relative to cattle in streets. 591 

Report accepted, leave to withdraw on draining passageway 
616 

Discussion, and concurrence in amendment rel.ating to fast 
driving, 637 

Resolve and order from Commissioners, for widening Lev- 
erett St.. 667 

Order passed for extension of East Lenox St., 667 

Report accepted, leave to withdraw, on draining passage- 
ways. 6S4 

Report and order passed to petition for authority to widen 
School St., 686 

Order passed for widening Bowdoin St. between Adams 
and Wash. Sts., 700 

Order passed for widening Shawmut Ave. from Lenox St. 
to Roxbury St., and providing means of paj-nient, 7U0 

Orders passed for widening Leverett St. from Charles to 
Brighton Sts., 700 

Notice of rejection of order for widening School St., 700 

Orders p.assed for extension of Commerce St. and assuming 
betterments, 725 

Discussion, resolve and order passed for extension of Swett 
St., 756; order for providing means for same referred to 
.next City Council, 760 

Resolves and order passed to widen Ple.isant St., 760 

Order p.assed to purchase two sweeping macliines, 761 
Suffolk St. Di-strict — 

Powers vested in Com. on Northampton St. District, 32 
Sumner, Charles — 

Special meeting of the Common Council, 128 

Resolutions, remarks, and Committee appointed, 128 

Order passed for 1,000 copies of Memorial, 228 

Reports and resolutions adopted relating to portraits, 381 
Sweetser, ilr.. Ward 10 — remarks: on 

The Salary 15111, 132, 204 

Railway station near Chestnut-Hill Reservoir, 133 

The Water Supply, 360 

Ferry passes to city employes, 446 

Soup tor the Poor, 6.64, 684 
Swett St. District — 

Order passed to petition Legislature, 292 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



27 



Report accepted, inexpedient to obtain legislative authority 
to raise grade of Hampden St., etc., 329 
Taxes — 

Discussion on, and order passed providing for interest, 323 

Discussion on interest, and votes to adliere and recede, 344 

Adlierence to vote on interest, and conference committee 
appointed, 407 

Conference report accepted, and interest fixed at ten per 
cent., 423 

Remitted on estate of Mary Holdcn, 511 

Order passed relative to Lowell Scbool-house site, 674 
Thaclier, Mr., Ward 15 — remarlis : on 

Tlie Burrill Claim. 24 

The Water Supply, 25. 250 

The Salary Bill, 108, 161. 200 

Railway station at Chestnut-Hill Reservoir, 133 

Waste Water, 588 

Steam-pump and fire-pipe in City Hall, 591 

Stand-pipe for Public Library, 592 

Pumping engines at Lake Cochituate, 601 

Books for Law Department, 760 

Sudbury River scheme, 763 
Train, Mr., Ward 13 — remarks: on 

The Burrill Claim, 24. 218, 246, 258 

Extension of Swelt St., 32 

Police Boat, 131 

The Salary Bill, 161, 175 

The WateV Supply, 274. 349 

Interest on taxes, 323, 344 

Small-pox hospital, 363 

Transfers from Reserved Fund, 517 

Extension of East Lenox St., 533 

Pumping engines at Lake Cochituate, 602 

Water supply, 618 

Investigation of assertions of jobbery, etc., 634 

Nonesuch Pond Water Scheme, 675 

Soup for the Poor, 686 

Sudbury River sclieme, 703 

Swett St. extension, 758 
Treasury department — 

Order passed autliorizing Treasurer to pay amount of lost 
coupons, 98 

Unfinished Business — 

Of last year, referred to committees, 3 

Referred to next City Council: 

Laying out ornamental ground on Back Bay Square, 755 

Vacancies, inspectors of lighters, 755 

Law Dept.. ordinance to amend. 756 

Providing means for extension of Swett St., 760 

All matters of uutiiiished nature, 704 

Vacation — 

Adjournment to second Thursday in September, 445, 446 
Votes of Thanks — 

To Hon. Carl Schurz, for oration, 249 

To F. D. Huntington and others, and C. H. Brainard and 
others, for portraits of Charles Sumner, 381 

To Hon. Richard Frothiiigham, for oration on Fourth July, 
418 

To Gen. B. F. Butler, for offer of Sudbury River, 764 

To President of Common Council, 764 
Voting Lists — see Elections. 

Warren, Mr., Ward 12 — reinarks : 

Personal explanation relating to report on tlie Water 

Supply, 2-18 
The Water Supply. 250, 274, 292, 320, 350 
Consolidation of Water Boards, 443 
Bigelow School District, 53S, 557 
Water Supply from Nonesuch pond, 617, 675 
Sudbury River Scheme. 703, 725, 764 
Swett St. extension, 757 
Washington's Birthday — 

Order passed for celebrating, 57 
Water — 

Discussion on, and order passed relative to adding to waters 

of Mystic Pond, 3 
Report on taking Sudbury River, and discussion, 25 
Order passed to consider expediency of making connection 

between Farm Pond and Lake Cochituate, 34 
Order to print 5U0 copiesof report on additional supplyfDoc. 

29). 44, 57, 78 
Order passed to pay expenses incurred in procuring neces- 
sary information concerning supply, 57 
Order passed referring porlicin of report of Registrar to 

Joint Standing Com. on Water, 60 
Discussion on, .-ind order passed relative to purity of water 

of Charles Hiver, and mill damages on same and Sudburj- 

River, 61 
Order passed to consider expediency of consolidating Water 

Boards. 78 
Report and order passed relative to licensing plumbers. 81 
Order passed to petition for authority to consolidate tlie 

two Water Bo.irds, 103 
Order passed for com. to report in print. 159 
Order passed to ascertain water-shed of Mystic pond, 159 



Majority and minority reports on additional Water Supply, 

and discussion on same, 229 
Order relating to examination of Charles River, 249 
Order relating to inspection of works by City Council, 250 
Order passed authorizing supply for institutions at South 

Boston, 257 
Discussion on supply from Sudbury River, 260 
Order for Cochituate Water Board to submit annual report 

in print, 260 
Order relating to supply for Ward 17, 261 
Report and order relating to Wards 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 and 19, 

272 
Report on the Charles River Water Supply, 272 
Order passed relative to water-shed of Mystic lake. 274 
Discussion on additional Water Supply, 274, 292, :529. 364 
Remarks of Messrs. Warren and Peabody, ordered to be 

printed, 2sl 
Order passed for extension of works to Wards 13, 14, 15, 16, 

and for surveys to Wards 17 and 19, 291, 325 
Order passed for City Solicitor to attend the annual meeting 

of the Mystic Kiver Corporation, 310 
Discussion and order passed relating to additional supply, 

347 
Order passed to consider expediency of extending pipe from 

Canal St. to City Sq., Charlestown, 363 
Order passed for estimate of cost of sewer to protect Mystic 

Pond, 368 
Order for report in print on obtaining adequate supply of 

water from Cochituate and Mystic basins, 36S 
Order passed to consider expedie icy of usiiis; Lake Cochitu- 
ate as storage-basin for purification of Sudbury Hiver, 

36S 
Report and order for taking waters of Sudbury River, and 

Farm Pond (City Doc. 17), specially assigned tor first 

meeting in Sept., 3S5 
Order passed for preventing waste of water, 386 
Order passed to examine availability of Cliarles [{iver. 405 
Order passed to charge to appropriation for additional sup- 

ply of water, the expense of procuring information 

relative to adequate supply. 4ii6 
Order passed to extend main pipe from Cannl St. to City Sq , 

Charlestown. 418 
Discussion on consolidating Water Boards. 418, 440; Ordi- 
nance rejected, 444; reconsideration laid on table, 445 
Message from the Mayor, appointing Medical Commission, 

464 
Order to request opinion of B. R. Curtis on extent of powers 

of proposed Boston Water Board, discu.-sed and re- 
jected, 4t)6 
Report of Water Board, on waste, 523 
Order passed for Commission of Physicians to report in 

print, 56j 
Ordinance reported, and discussion on waste water, 587 
Report and discussion on combined Cochituate and Mystic 

supply, and on Charles River, and order passed . elating 

to I'egan Brook, 589 
Discussion on, and ordinance passed relating: to water rates. 

593 
Discussion on, and orderpassed relating to pumping-engines 

at Lake Cochituate. 601 
Preliminary report from Medical Commission. 6J2 
Discussion and order passed to petition for water supply 

from Charles Kiver, 603 
Order passed relating to licensing plumbers, 605 
Discussion on vacancies in Cochitnat(^ Water Board. 616 
Discussion on, and order passed relative to drainage of 

Mystic Basin, 617 
Discussion on, and order passed relative to Nonesuch Pond, 

617, 621 
Order to petition for authority to take Nonesuch. Pickerel, 

and .Morse Ponds, Stevens Brook, also, Shaw.sliine Kiver, 

and discussion, 618 
Surveys of Flax, Sluice and Cedar Ponds, authorized, 631 
Messrs. Standish and White elected members of Water 

Board, 632 
Discussion, and Investigating Committee appointed on asser- 
tions of speculation, jobbery and fraud, 63i 
Discussion on proposed new Water Board, 638 
Order passed rel.itive to drainage of Mystic Basin, 633 
Com. from B. F. Butler, discussed and referred, and opinion 

of Citj Solicitor. 6:31 
Surveys authorized for drainage of Woburii, Stoneliam, 

Winchester and Medford. 654 
Order passed to obtain assent of owners on Sudbury River, 

6)4 
Reports on supply from Nonesuch Pond. 657 
Discussion and order relative to invesiigation rejected. 660 
Order passed to report ordinance to regulate distribution of 

Mystic Water, 667 
Letter from M. J. Bradlee, declining election to Water 

Board, and re-election of L. Miles St;indish, 6ii7 
Order passed for bonding lands fir Mystic storagi', 6<>7 
Report and order passed establisliing Mystic water rates, 

6l3'J 
Report accepted, from special committee, to investigate 

assertions of jobbery, etc., and discussion, 670 
Discussion on Nonesuch Pond Water Scheme, and rejection, 

674 



28 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF COMMON COUNCIL. 



Order relative to communication from Geo. A. Shaw, to 

Clerk of Committees rej<'cted, 670 
Motion to recon»i<ler aeceplance of i;ive8tigation report, and 

adjournment for want of quorum, pending remarks by 

Geo. A. Shaw, 68i); remarks by Mr. Shaw resumed, 

diseuBsion, and withdrawal of motion, 700 
r)i!»eusHion on Sudbury Klver Sph'.'m<', 703 
Keport and order pasued, $200,000 for water-pipes for Wards 

17 and 19, 725 
Sudbury lliver scheme, — discussion, 72.5, 734 
Order pa8>ied authorizing $100,000 contract for water-pipes, 

etc., for next tinancial year, 761 
Sudbury Uiver Scheme — discussion, and order amended 

and passed, 761 
West, Mr., Ward 16 — remarks : on 
Wilson's Hotel, Ward 19, 23, 44 
Badges, 24 

Bunlier-Hill District, 26 
Garden District, 27 

Referring report of Fire Commissioners, 81 
The Salary Bill. 131, 161, 201 
Tlie Appropriation Bill, 141, 162, 174, 197 
Salaries of Firemen, etc., 147 
Closing Transfers of financial year, 159 
Kew engine-house, 259 
Fourth July, 311 
Interest on taxes, 323, 344 
Annual report of Fire Department, 406 
Consolidating Water Boards, 419, 444, 466 
New Grammar School-house, Edgeworth St., Charlestown, 

438 
Site for school-house, Lawrence District, 425, 445 
Widening of Tremont St. on Boston Common, 464 
Transfers from Reserved Fund, 518 
Home for the Poor, 518, 522 
Bigelow School District, 638, 557 
The proposed Nautical School, 558, 566 
Btandpipe for Public Library, 592 
King St. School-house, 593 
Water Supply, 619 



Investigation of assertions of jobbery, etc., 634 

Fast-driving In the streets, 638 

I'roposed new Water Board, 638 

Employment for the Poor, 659 

Mystic Water Kates, 670 

Nonesuch Pond Water Scheme, 676 

Sudbury Kiver Scheme, 727 
Weston, Mr., Ward 1 — remarks: on 

The Salary Bill, 176, 201 
Whlston, Mr., Ward 8 — remarks: on 

The Salary Bill, 175 
Wilbur, Mr., Ward 9 — remarks: on 

Salaries of Firemen, etc., 146 

Bird-houses for Public Grounds, 309, 325 

The contract for the official report, 381 

Fountain in Independence Sq.. 523 

Extension of East Lenox St., 533 

Waste Water, 588 

Greenhouse on Public Garden. 591 

Btandpipe for Public Library, 592 

Pumping-engine at Lake Cochituate, 601 

Employment for the Poor, 660 

Investigation of assertions of jobbery, etc., 674 

Sudbury River scheme, 726 
Willcutt, Mr., Ward 17 — remarks : on 

The Salary Bill, 132 

Bird-houses for Public Grounds, 309 

Widening of Shawmut Ave., 425 

Fast driving in the streets, 638 

Swett St. extension, 757 
Woodward, Mr., Ward 13 — remarks : on 

Widening of Shawmut Ave., 424 

FESTAL PROCEEDINGS. 

Resolution of thanks to President, 764 
Remarks of members, 764 
Response of President, 765 
Adjournment, sine die, 766 



OITY OOVKRNMENT, 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Organization of the Government, 

.JANUARY 5, 1874. 



BOARD OF AI.HEHMEN. 

Tho members-elect of the Board of Aldermen were 
called to order at twenty minutes past ten o'clock by 
(Mty-Clerk McCleary. The Mayor-elect, Hon. Sairi 
uel C. Cobb, was accompanied to the chamber by 
Hev. Edward Everett Hale, and Chief Justice (iray of 
the Supreme Court, who took peats at the Mayor's 
li^ht. A messajje was received from the Common 
Conncil that a quorum of that body was present and 
I eady to proceed to business. The lioard then pro- 
ceeded to the Conncil Chamber, nnder the charge of 
City-Messenger Peterg, headed by the Mayor, .ludsie 
(iray and Rev. Mr. Hale. 

COMMON COUNCIL. 

The Common Council was called to order at ten 
o'clock A. M. by Mr. George A. Shaw of Ward .'), 
the senior member, who said — 

(ientlemen of the Council— It becomes my duty, as 
senior member in service, to ask if it is the pleasure 
of the Council soon to come to order. One year afro 
today a like duty fell to my lot to perform, and in 
that capacity I took occasion to advert to some sul)- 
jects which I considered of importance to the city's 
interest, and which appeared to me should be acted 
on with despatch. And It is gratifying to recognize 
the fact that the establishment of the Board of 
Health, as one of the earliest movements of the year, 
and of the Fire Commission at a later day, are fully 
appreciated and approved by the people; and this in 
itself should be a sufficient reward for onr labors. 
These two measures are now fairly before the 
public for trial, with every reason for the belief that 
experience will prove them to be highly advantageous 
to the public welfare. And certainly no one who, one 
year ago, looked upon the sixty acres of territory 
over which the tire tiend had then so recently travel- 
led, can have reason to be dissatisfied with such 
action as the City Council has, during the year past, 
taken in the premises, nor doubt the energy and en- 
terprise of our people; for where were then seen 
nothing but the footprints of destruction, today we 
find magnificent warehouses, filled with merchandise 
and abundant evidence of thrifty commerce. The 
order providing for the purchase of land npon which 
to establish a home for the poor,— which is by no 
means a matter of minor importance,— though too 
long delayed, • has finally been adopted; and 
other measures looking to the puhlic good 
have been introduced, which will receive, as 
they deserve, our attention at an early day. 
The acquisition of new territory to the city, and 
the presence of the representatives of that territory 
for the first time today, add new interest and im- 
portance to our action; and, I think we may safely 
say, will add strength to our legi.-lation and inure 
to the best interests of our whole people. Dealing 
with and legislating for all classes of the community, 
without regard to party lines or party prejudices; 
regardless of sect or creed, nationality or color, it is 
our duty to manage, with sound conservative policy, 
vet with firm and deteimined action, our varied in- 
terests. Conflicting interests and conflicting opin- 
ions are constantly brought to our attention requir- 
ing of us considerate counsels and the exer- 
cise of sound judgement in their disposal. 
Constantly bearing in mind that our city is a great 
corporation, in which every citizen — even the 
poorest, as well as the millionnaire, — is, to a greater or 
less extent, a stockholder; it is our duty as trustees, 
chosen by the people, to administer its affairu with 
even-handed justice — not favoring one at the ex- 
pense of another, but watchful ever even for the 
minutest interests, — with jealous care to prevent en- 
croachment on individual rights, from whatever 
source they may proceed. God, in his infinite 
wisdom, has vouchsafed to us as a community 
blessings without number, and it is for the City 
(iovernment, as trustees and guardians of the Dublic 
welfare, to apply those blessings in such a manner 
as shall serve the best interests of the whole people, 
and redound to our own honor. 

On motion of Mr. Davis of Ward 14, it was order- 
ed that a committee of five be appointed to collect 
the certificates of the members elect. 

Messrs. Davis of Ward 14, Barnes of Ward 11. 
Hnnnewell of Ward li). ^\■illcutt of Ward 17 and 
Klatley of Ward 4 were appointed such committee. 
Th'y reiiorted that they had collected sixty-eight 



certificates, and that a quorum was present. On mo- 
tion of Mr. Page of Ward 9 the report was aciepted. 
On motion of Mr. Pease of Ward 1, it was ordered 
that a message be sent to inform the Mayor and Al- 
dermen elect that there is a quorum of the (-'ommon 
Council present and ready to be qualified. Mr. 
Pease of Ward 1 was appointed such committee and 
subsequently reported that he had performed that 
duty, and thai the Mayor and Aldermen would forth- 
with attend for the purpose of qualifying the mem- 
bers. 

IN .JOINT CONVENTION. 

Hon. Samuel C. Cobb. Mayor elect, and the Alder- 
men elect, entered the Council Chamber and took 
seats with the Councilmen elect. 

Prayer was offered by Kev. E. E. Hale. 

Hon Horace Gray, Chief-Justice of the Supreme 
Judicial Court, administered to H(m. Samuel C. Cobb. 
iVlayor elect, the usual oatk of office. 

The names of the Aldermen elect and Councilmen 
elect were called by the City Clerk, and the oaths of 
office were administered by his Himor the Mayor. 

The address of the Mayor was then delivered and. 
at its conclusion, the Mayor and Aldermen retired. 

BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

On motion of Alderman Power, the Board proceeded 
to elect a chairman, and the result was that ihe whole 
number of votes cast, eleven, were for Ald-rman 
John T. Clark. On taking the chair Alderman Claik 
said — 

Gentlemen of the Board of Aldermen— Before en- 
tering upon the duties of the office to which you have 
elected me, I desire to tender to you my most sincere 
thanks for the honor conferred and for this mark of 
your confidence and respect. Distrusting my ability 
to meet the requirements of the position, I should 
not have accepted it had I not felt the assurance of 
vour kind indulgence and cooperation in the execu- 
tion of the duties which the office demands, and I 
assure you. gentlemen, my earnest desire and en- 
deavor will be to perform these duties in such a maL- 
ner as to meet your approval. The increased growrh 
of the city in business and population has added 
greatly to the responsibilities of those who administ- 
er its affairs. 

Under the present organization a large portion of 
the executive as well as legislative powers of the 
Municipal Government are exercised by this Board, 
and in proportion to the powers vested in us are we 
responsible for the good government of the city. D 
is incumbent upon us, therefore, in assuming the per- 
formance of these important duties, to do so with a 
firm and determined purpose to faithfully and hon- 
estly advocate and carry out such measures, and 
such only, as will help develop tne growth of Boston 
and promote the general prosperity and welfare of 
the citizens. 

The noble sentiments and inspiring words which 
we have just heard expressed by his honor the Mayor 
will meet with a hearty response from the enterpris- 
ing business men of our city, and should make every 
member of the Gouernment proud of his opportuni 
ties for doing something to advance the welfare of 
the community in which he lives. Gentlemen, trust- 
ing that our associations here may be of the most 
pleasant character, and that nothing may arise to 
prevent the most friendly relations in the perform- 
ance of all our duties, and again thanking you for 
your consideration, I await your further pleasure. 

On motion of Alderman Cutter, a message was sent 
to the Common Council informing that body of the 
organization of the Board, and a recess of fifteen min- 
utes was taken. After the recess a message was re- 
ceived from the Common Council to the effect that 
the Council was fully organized and ready to proceed 
to business. 

On motion of Alderman Stebbins, a message was 
sent to the Common Council proposing a joint con- 
vention for the choice of City Clerk. The Council 
having concurred, the Board proceeded to the Coun- 
cil Chamber to participate in the convention. 

COMMON COUNCIL. 

After the Mayor and Aldermen retired, Mr. Shaw- 
resumed the chair. 

On motion of Mr. Thacher of Ward 15, the Council 
proceeded to ballot for a president. Messrs. Thacher 
of Ward 1.5, Bn-ckett of Ward 10, Cawley of Ward 2, 
Kent of Ward 21 and Whiston of Ward 8 were ap- 
pointed a committee to collect the votes, and from 
their report it appeared that Edward O. Shepard of 
Ward 4 was chosen president, he having received 72 
votes, the whole number cast. 

Messrs. Boardman of Ward 14 and Dean of Ward 
12 were appointed a committee to conduct the presi- 
dent to the chair, and on taking the chair the presi- 
dent said— 



JANUARY 



18 7 4: 



o 



Gi-Mtlemen of the Common Council— I am deeply 
irratefiil to you for the conlidence in me yon have dis- 
played and tlie high honor you have conferred upon 
me in electing me by your unanimous vote to this 
important office. Whatever previous strivings there 
have been in the labored onset which on my behalf 
was mainly opposed by the quiet influence of my 
record in this i-ilace during the past year; whatever 
unjust and unfounded arguments may have been 
n>ed against me to aid the opposing purpose— on 
which fide any of you may have been arrayed; these, 
in to far as you all are concerned, are no longer 
to be remembered by me, but are fully can- 
celled by vour unanimous vote today. To be 
called to preside over the Common Council 
of 1874 I regard as an especial honor, not 
only on account of its superior character, but be- 
cause there are embraced in it, for the first time, the 
representatives of the Charlestown, West Roxbury 
and Brighton wards, whom, in behalf of t^e repre- 
sentatives of Boston, as it was, I welcome to this Coun- 
cil Chamber. Having occupied this office during the 
last year, I am fully acquainted with its duties, its 
responsibilities, and its difficulties, it will be my 
conscientious endeavor, at all times, to acquit my- 
self iu all tiiat belongs to the position with fidelity 
to the public trust it imposes upon me, and with a 
due reifard to your risihts and privileges. 1 shall 
confidently look to you for the support without which 
I caiinit hope to succeed, and for jour charitable 
construction upon the errors and on issions which I 
may, from lime to time, unintentionilly commit. 

In justice to you and to myself, I taKe this oppor- 
tunity to declare in your full assembly that no mem- 
ber of this Council has received from me, or trom 
any other person with my knowledge or authority, 
directly or indirectly, any assurance or intimation of 
any place or preferment which lies in my power as 
president to bestow. The personal knowledge of 
the truth of my statement which yourselves possess, 
gives the intentional lie to those unprincipled men 
whu to secure their own ends have said otherwise. 
A few suggestions that have occurred to me from my 
experience in the two Councils prior to this, regard- 
ing matters that are or may be governed by your 
rules and rearulations, will ba received for what they 
may be worth. A loose way has heretofore prevail- 
ed of obtaining the City Solicitor's legal opinion for 
the purpose of using it in argument for or against a 
measure under consideration. If the Committee on 
Ordinances were constitutea the Judiciary Com- 
mittee of this body and the opinion of the Solicitor 
upon questions of the legality of pending orders 
should only be a^ked and obtained through that 
committee, to which all such matters could be re- 
ferred, the opinions would without doubt be more 
carefully asked, and the law instead of the lawyer 
would be more likely to suffer blame. A large num- 
ber of reports and orders from the Committee on the 
Survey and Inspestiou of Buildings occupy time in 
every meeting, in taking their several readings, but 
which have always been looked upon as mere matters 
of form. It is possible that some method can be de- 
vised, either by delegating the proper power to the 
committee, or in some other way, by which that 
business can be transacted as well as it is now done. 
and save the time of the City Council for less formal 
matters. 

Your presiding officer cannot interfere with the 
freedom of debate unless it transgresses some rule of 
parliamentary law or of your own adoption. The 
previous question has heretofore been the only 
means of putting an end to debate. The discussion 
of questions that come before you should be extend- 
ed enough to give them the fullest consideration, so 
that all may vote intelligently and upon their own 
judgment of the merits; but this is a business body 
and the time of its members ought not to be occupied 
with idle remarks, or with speeches for outside effect 
tnat are jiot needed to give sufficient information or 
argument to secure the passage or defeat of the pend- 
ing measure. It is in your power to make such rules 
regulating the freedom of debate as you may think 
expedient. 

This Common Council enters upon its career under 
the most favorable auspices. It already deservedly 
enjoys a high reputation for the superior ability and 
excellence "of its material. It possesses the public 
confidence to an unusual degree. The hopes and 
expectations of the public mind for wise and honest 
legislation in municipal affairs centre upon it. I pre- 
dict that by the dignity and decorum that will prevaH 
in all your proceedings, by the wisdom that will be 
shown in your dealing with the subjects upim which 
you will be called to act by your disinterested devo- 
tion to the public trusts committed to your cnarge, 
the Common Council of 1874 will achieve for Itself a 
foremost place in the annals of the city governments 
of Boston. 



On motion of Mr. Wilbur of Ward », the Council 
proceeded to ballot for a clerk, and Messrs. Wilbur of 
Ward 9, Pease of Ward 1. Sprague of Ward 4, Abbott 
of Ward 3, and Hunnewell of Ward 19 were appoint- 
ed a committee to collect the votes, and they re- 
ported that Washington P. Gregg had been elected, 
he receiving seventy-one votes. The oath of office 
was administered to the Clerk of the Common Coun- 
cil by John P. Healy, the City Solicitor. 

On motion of Mr. Barnes of Ward 11, it was or- 
dered that a committee be appointed to inform the 
Board of Aldermen of the organization of the Com- 
mon Council and Mr. Barnes was appointed such 
committee and attended to that duty. 

A certificate was received from the Board of Alder- 
men that John T. Clark had been elected cnairman 
of said board. 

Read and placed on file. 

IN JOINT CONVENTION. 

A joint convention was held for the purpose of 
electing a City Clerk, the Mayor presiding. Alder- 
man Stebhins, Councilmen Flynn of Ward T and 
Hunnewell of Ward 19, were appoirted a committee 
to receive ballots, and they reported that eighty- four, 
the whole number, had been cast for Samuel F. Mc- 
Cleary, and that he had been chosen. 

The oath of office was administered to the City 
Clerk, by His Honor the Mayor, and the Mayor and 
Aldermen withdrew, and President Shepard resumed 
the chair. 

BOARD or ALDEKMEN. 

Eight grand jurors were drawn for the Superior 
Criminal Court. 

The following executive appointments were con- 
firmed: 

Constables— Charles Burcham, Joseph H. Knox, 
Stephen P. Kellogg. 

Special Policeman— John J. Bourne, Monument- 
square Methodist Episcopal Church. 

On motion of Alderman Cutter the Board proceeded 
to ballot for a committee on accounts, which resulted 
as follows: John T. Clark, Vi; James Power. 12; 
Solomon B. Stehbins, 11; and Aldermen Clark. 
Power and Stebbins were declared elected such 
committee. 

On motion of Alderman Clark — 

Ordered, That the rules and orders of the Board of 
Aldermen of 1873 be adopted as the rules and oiders 
of this Boara until otherwise ordered, and that 
Aldermen be a committee to examine and re- 
port if any alterations are required therein. 

Passed, and Aldermen Clark, Bigelow and Harris 
appointed said committee. 

On motion of Alderman Power — 

Ordered, That the several heads of departments 
and boards of directors of the various institutions 
be authorized to submit their annual reports in print 
under the direction of the Superintendent of 
Printing. 

On motion of Alderman Stebbins— 

Ordered, That such of the subordinate employes 
in tke service of the city of Charlestown and the 
.towns of West Roxbury and Brighton, 8t the time of 
their union with the city of Boston, as may be re- 
quired, be retained in the employ of the city of Bos- 
ton under the direction of the heads of the various 
departments to which their service appropriately be- 
longed until otherwise ordered, and that the several 
superintendents or heads of departments be,and they 
ere hereby directed forthwith to take the charge ana 
direction of such employes accordingly, and also of 
all public property heretofore belonging to said de- 
partments in Charlestown. West Roxbury and Brigh- 
ton. 

Ordered, That the compensation paid to said em- 
ployes, thus adopted by the several departments, be 
continued until the close of the present salary year, 
or until otherwise ordered, at the same rate per day 
or month as was fixed for their services by the au- 
thorities of Charlestown, West Roxbury and Brigh- 
ton, respectively. 

Ordered, That the late City Clerk of Charlestown 
and the treasurers of Charlestown. Brighton and 
West Roxbury be retamed as assistants respectively 
to the City Clerk and City Treasurer of Boston until 
the close of the present salary year, at the same ratf 
of compensation heretofore allowed to them respec- 
tively, for the purpese of completing the work in 
their several departments; the expense to be charged 
to the appropriation for Salaries. 

Ordered, That the Treasurers of Charlestown. Brigh- 
ton and West Roxbury be authorized to pay until the 
12th inst. all bills against their respective municipal- 
ities which have been duly allowed, approved and 
audited up to January 1. 

Severally passed. 

On motion of Alderman Bigelow — 

Ordered, That until otherwise ordered. Mondays 



3 



CITY G^OVKHNiVlENT 



t 4 o'clock P. M. be assigned as the days and hour 
or holding the regular meetings of this Board. 

Passed. 

On motion of Alderman Cutter- 
Ordered, That the members of the Board of Alder- 
men and one member of the Common Council from 
each ward be a committee to determine and pay the 
allowances of State aid to the families of disabled 
soldiers and the families of the slain, pursuant to the 
existing acts of the Legislature; and that said com- 
mittee have power to employ a paymaster and such 
clerical assistants as may be required for that pur- 
pose; and that the expense be charged to the ap- 
propriation for Soldiers' Kclief. 

Passed. 

An order was received from the Council appointing 
a Committee on Joint Rules and Orders. The Board 
concurred and Aldermen Cutter and Worthington 
were joined to the committee. 

On motion of Alderman Cutter — 

Ordered, That a Joint Special Committee be ap- 
pointed consisting of three members of the Board 
of Aldermen with such as the Common Council may 
join, to take charge of the unfinished work of pro- 
curing surveys, plans and estimates for the improve- 
ments on the district bounded northwesterly by 
Washington street, southwesterly by Euslis street 
and Wall street, southeasterly by Albany street, and 
northeasterly by Northampton street; said committee 
to be known as the Committee on the Northampton- 
street District. 

Passed, and Aldermen Cutter. Stebbins and Pres- 
cott appointed. 

Adjourned. 

IN COMMON COUNCIL. 

It was ordered — 

On motion of Mr. Wilbur of Ward 9, that Thurs- 
day next at 8j<r P. M. be assigned as the time for the 
election on the part of the Council of a Standing 
Committee on Accounts, and Messrs. Wilbur of 
Ward », Powers of Ward 4, and Train of Ward 13 
were ai)pointed a committee to nominate candidates. 

Mr. Whiston of Ward 8 offered an order that 
Messrs. be appointed a committee to nomi- 
nate a Director of Public Inslitntions. Laid on the 
table on motion of Mr. Wilbur of Ward 9. 

On motion of Mr. Woods of Ward 8, the following- 
named persons were appointed the Standing Commit- 
tee of the Council on Elections: Messrs. Woods of 
Ward 8, Flatley of Ward 4, Long of Ward 22, Bur- 
gess of Ward y and Beal of Ward 16. 

On motion of Mr. Bnrditt of Ward Ifi, the Presi- 
dent appointed Messsr. Bnrditt of Ward 1(>, Board- 
man of Ward 14, Flynn of Ward 7, Cawley of Ward 
2, and Kent of Ward 21, a committee, with such as 
the Aldermen may join, to icport what disposition 
should be made of the topics in the Mayor's inau- 
gural address. 

On motion of Mr. Thacher of Ward 15, that the 
rules and orders f>f the Common Council of 1873 be 
adopted for the government of this Council until 
otherwise ordered. 

On motion of Mr. Woods of Ward 8, that the Mu- 
nicipal Register be printed under the direction of the 
Joint Committee on Rules and Orders, who may em- 
ploy snch assistance as may be deemed advisable; 
and that they also prepare a pocket edition for the 
use of the members. 

On motion of Mr. Davis of Ward 14, that Thursday 
next, at 8 P. M., be assigned as the time for the elec- 
tion on the part of the Council of a Standing Com- 
mittee on Finance; and Messrs. Davis of Ward 14, 
Loring of Ward 12, and Thacher of Ward 15 were ap- 
pointed to make nominations. 

On motion of Mr. Flatley of Ward 4, that the sev- 
eral joint standing committees be directed to resume 
the unfinished business of last year, appropriate to 
said committees, and all snch business be hereby re- 
ferred accordingly. Sent up for concurrence. 

On motion of Mr. Page of Ward 9, that his Honor 
the Mayor be requested to furnish a copy of his ad- 
dress, that the same may be printed. Sent up. 

On motion of Mr. Brackett of Ward 10, the Presi- 
dent appointed Messrs. Brackett of Ward 10, Dean 
of Ward 12 and Denny of Ward 9 a committee to 
prepare rules and orders for the Common Council for 
1874. 

On motion oi Mr. Davis of Ward 14— That Thurs 
day, at half-past seven o'clock, P. M., be the time 
for the meeting of the Council until otherwise' 
ordered. 

On motion of Mr. Thacher of Ward 15— That the 
Clerk prepare and cause to be printed a transcript of 



the Journal of the Council for the current municipal 
year. 

The following papers from the Board of Aldermen 
received concurrent action; 

Order directing the treasurers of Charlestown, 
West Roxbury and Brighton to pay bills until the 
12th inst. Passed. 

Order to retain the Clerks and Treasurers of 
Charlestown, West Roxbury and Brighton in the em- 
ploy of the city until otherwise ordered. Passed. 

Order appointing a special committee on North- 
ampton-street District. Passed. 

Order that subordinate employes in Charlestown, 
West Roxbury and Brighton be retained by the 
hefids of departments of the city of Boston. Passed. 

On motion of Mr. Flatly of Ward 4— 

Ordered, That the rules of the City Council of 187:^ 
be adopted for the government of the present Coun- 
cil till otherwise ordered. 

Sent up for concurrence. 

On motion of Mr. Brackett of Ward 10, the presi- 
dent appointed Messrs. Brackett, Dean and Denny a 
committee, with such as the Aldermen may loin,' to 
prepare joint rules and orders for the City Council 
dnring the present year. 

Sent up for concurrence. 

On motion of Mr. Shaw of Ward 5— 

Ordered, That a joint special committee consist- 
ing of five members of the Common Council with 
such as the Board of Alderman may join, be appoint- 
ed, who shall consider the expediency of laying out 
one or more public parks, upon a scale befitting 
the present public demaud and the prospective in- 
crease in area and population by additional annexa- 
tion of cities and towns to Boston: and to report 
upon the same with such suggestions and recom- 
mendations as, in their judgment, the best interests 
of the metropolis may require. Said committee to 
be called thf^ Committee on Public Works. 

Mr. Shaw explained that the order was identical with 
the one offered in the last Council. He believed the 
order represented public sentiment, and he hoped no 
words of his or anybody else would be needed to in- 
duce the Council to pass it. 

Mr. Denny of Ward 9 thought it very unusual to 
introduce such an order when it was understood this 
was a meeting for routine business only. The com- 
mittee appointed to take charge of topics in the 
Mayor's message should be permitted to report on 
this subject before passing such an order as this. 
He moved that the order lie on the table. Carried. 

On motion of Mr. Shaw of Ward 5— 

Ordered, That a joint special committee, to consist 
of the Standing Committee on Police on the part of 
the Common Council, together with such as the 
Board of Aldermen may join, be appointed, with in- 
structions to provide soup for the poor, said soup to 
be dealt out from various convenient localities under 
the direction of said committee; the expense of the 
same to be charged to the appropriation for Inci- 
dentals. 

Mr. Shaw said he had no doubt his worthy friend 
from Ward 9 would object to this order, but he had 
no objections. He only wanted the people of Bos- 
ton to get the soup, and in offering this measure he 
believed he represented the people of Boston. 

Mr. Denny of Ward 9 said there is a proper time 
and place to do everything, and this is an improper 
time to do business with which the Council is unfa- 
miliar. He moved that the order lie noon the table, 
though he was strongly tempted to move an indefin- 
ite postponement. 

A rising vote on the motion to lay on the table was 
taken, but before the result was declared Mr. Shaw 
of W^ard 5 called for the yeas and nays, but the 
Council refused to sustain the call. The President 
announced the result to be 47 for, 21 against Mr. 
Denny's motion to lay on the table. 

Petitions were received from W. P. Farrington ef 
al., for a recount of the vote for councilmenin Ward 
13; from Robert McCue and John W. Mahan, giving 
notice of intention to contest the seats of Richard 
Jennings and Michael McCarty, councilmen elect 
from Ward 5; from John Sanborn et al., for a recount 
of the votes for councilmen in Ward 21, and from W. 
F. Watson, claiming to be entitled to the fourth seat 
in the Council from Ward 5. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Elections. 

On motion of Mr. Page of Ward 9, the Council pro- 
ceeded to draw for seats in the usual manner, at the 
conclusion of which, on motion of Mr. Wilbur of 
Ward 9, the Council adjourned. 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

JANUARY 8, 1874. 



The regular weekly meeting was held at half-past 
seven o'clock P. M., E. O. Shepard, Preeideut, in the 
chair. On motion of Mr. Flatley of Ward 4, the roll 
was called. 

Present— Messrs. Abbott, Adams, Barnes, Beal, 
Bearce, Bleiler, Boardman, Bracket!, Burditt, Bur- 
gess, Butler, Cawley, Collins, Crocker. Crowley, Cud- 
worth, Cushnian, Dacey, Day, Dean, Denny, Flatley, 
Flynn, Fuller, Goldthwait, Gordon, Harrington, Hicks, 
Hine, Hunnewell, Jennings, Kent, Kimball, Leach, 
Long, Loring, Martin, Minot, Moley, Mooney, Noyes, 
Page, Pease, Perkins, Powers, Pray, Putnam, Russell, 
Shaw, Sibley, Smith, Sprague, Sweat, Sweetser, 
Thacher, Walbridge, Warren, West, Weston, Whis- 
ton, E. P. Wilbur, N. S. Wilbur, Willcutt, Woods— 
64. 

Absent— Messrs. Barry. Bent, Brown, Davis, Lynch, 
McCarty, Morse, Peabody, Train— 9. 

REPORT OP COMMITTEE ON ELECTIONS. 

Mr. Woods of Ward 8 moved that the rules be sus- 
pended in order to hear the report of the Standing 
Committee on Elections. Carried. 

Mr. Woods of Ward 8, from the Standing Commit- 
tee on Elections, to whom was referred the petition 
of John Sanborn et al. for a recount of votes cast for 
members of the Common Council at the last election 
in Ward 21, reported that they have carefully re- 
counted the original ballots in the possession of the 
City Clerk, with the following result: William H. 
Kent, 498; H. H. Chandler, 178; Francis W. Pray, 
474; John Kelley, 449: Francis B. Bogan, 269; B. P. 
Stacey, 6; William Howard, 3; James K. Carmichael, 
2; Charles A. West, 2; J. Riley, 1. It appears, there- 
fore, that William H. Kent and Francis W. Pray, who 
now occupy seats in the Common Council, wert: duly 
elected. 

The report was accepted. 

Mr. Woods of Ward 8, from the Standing Commit- 
tee on Elections, to whom was referred tiie notices 
from John W. Mahan and Robert McCue contesting 
the right of Richard Jennings and Michael H. Mc- 
Carty to occupy the seats in The Common Council 
from Ward 5, and asking for a recount of the votes 
cast for members of the Council from said ward, and 
for such furtlier action as to the legality of the elec- 
tion as may be deemed appropria'e and necessary; 
and to whom was also referred the petition of W. P. 
Watson, asking for a recount of ihe votes cast for 
Councilmen, in the belief that errors were made in 
the count by the ward officers, reported, that al- 
though the petition from W. P. Watson failed to 
specify the ward in which errors were alleged, the 
committee were ahle to identify it with Ward 5, inas- 
much as the petitioner was a candidate for the Coun- 
cil from that ward, and had with others served a no- 
tice on the City Clerk, .immediately after the 
election, setting forth his belief that the re- 
turns were incorrectly made by the ward officers. 
As the two contestants also asked for a re- 
count of all the votes cast for Council- 
men, the committee deemed it their duty to waive 
any defects in the form of the applications and re- 
count all the votes as requested. Upon unsealing 
the box containing the original ballots, there was 
found a small bundle consisting of several envelopes 
and rolls, containing ballots, or parts of ballots, 
which had evidently not bten counted by the ward 
officers, although there was no statement to show 
whether they had or had not been counted. All the 
ballots found in the box, except those contained in 
the bundle, were then counted with the follow- 
ing result: George A. Shaw .319, Amos L. Noyes 
280, Michael H. McCarty 260, Richard Jennings 254. 
John W. Mahan 233. William W. Thain 184, Robert 
McCue 2.35, James Kelley 121, Henry N. Stone 46, 
William F. Watson 19, William Heman 14, W. J. 
Wilson 15, W. G. Baker 15, Thomas Wallace 1. John 
Small, Jr , 12, Thomas R. Wallace 2. The ballots 
contained in the bundle were then counted with 
the following result: Michael H. McCarty 26, 
Richard Jennings 18, John W. Mahan 76, W. 
F. Watson 56. Georee A. Shaw 17, Robert 
McCue 17, James Kelly 9, Amos L. Noyes 4, 
William W. Thain 12. Ona package contained 
about fifty parts of ballots, pressed together 
into a very small compass, bearing only the names 
of John W. Mahan asd W. F. Watson for Council- 
men. In another package there were, four . loose 



pasters, folded up in a piece of a ballot bearing the 
name of Richard Jennings. These pasters are not 
included in the foregoing count, but all the names 
contained on the other ballots or parts of ballots are 
given. After they were counted, the ballots were re- 
stored as nearly as possible to the condition in which 
they were found. It will be oi^served that by the re- 
count of the votes which appear to have been p.op- 
eriy cast, the sitting members are entitled to their 
seats. If the votes which appear to have been ille- 
gally cast are counted, John W. Mahan has a larger 
number than Richard Jennings. Under these cir- 
cumsiances the committee have not considered it 
proper to pursue the investigation further, and send 
for persons and papers, without instructions from 
the Council. A comparison of the published returns 
of the ward officers, with the recount by the com- 
mittee is appended: 

Published Recount of Ballots In 
Name. returns, regular ballots, bundle. 

John W. Mahan 243 233 TC 

Henry N.Stone 38 46 

■VViUlam W. Thain 178 184 12 

Amos L. Noyes 364 280 4 

Michael H. McCarty.. 252 260 26 

Robert McCue 233 2:35 17 

Richard Jennings 252 254 18 

George A. Shaw 302 319 17 

James Kelley 116 121 9 

■William F. Watson.... 23 19 56 

■William Heman 14 

■W. J. Wilson 15 

W. G. Baker 15 

Thomas Wallace 1 

John Small, Jr 12 

Thomas K. Wallace 2 

The report was accepted. 

Mr. Woods of Ward 8, from the Standing Commit- 
tee on Elections, to whom was referred the petition 
of William F. Farrington et al., for a recount of the 
votes cast for members of the Common Council at 
the last municipal election in Ward 13, reported that 
they have carefully recounted the original ballots 
with the following result: Wilham Morse .352, Wil- 
liam G. Train 401, Martin Lynch .331, Nathan S. Wil- 
bur 382, W. Elliot Woodward .340, John J. Fox 317, 
J. P. Council 277. John Norton 260, A. W. Newman 
19, Daniel Whittaker 11, James B. Wheeler 8, Gideon 
Jenkins 8, H. B. Chamberlin 1. It appears, there- 
fore, that William Morse, William G. Train, W. 
Elliot Woodward and Nathan S. Wilbur were elected, 
and that Martin Lynch, who received a certificate of 
election, and now occupies a seat in this board, was 
not elected. The committee recommend the passage 
of the following preamble and resolution: 

Whereas, If appears from a recount of the original 
ballots cast at the last municipal election in Ward 13, 
that W. Elliot Woodward was elected a member of 
the Common Council from said ward, in place of 
Martin Lynch, who received a certificate of election — 

Resolved, That W. Elliot Woodward is entitled to 
■ the seat in this board now occupied by Martin 
Lynch. 

The leport was accepted and the preamble and res- 
olution adopted. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 moved that a committee be 
appointed to conduct Mr. Woodward to his Honor 
the Mayor or the City Clerk to be qualified as a 
member of the Council. Carried; and Messrs. Flynn 
of Ward 7 and Powers of Ward 4 were appointed 
said committee They subsequently reported that 
they haa attended to the duty assigned, and that Mr. 
Woodward had taken and subscribed to the necessary 
oaths of office and is now a member of the Common 
Council. The report was accepted and Mr. Wood- 
ward took his seat. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Order authorizing the heads of departments, etc., 
to submit their annual reports in print. Passed. 

Order for the appoiatment of a joint committee to 
determine and pay the allowance of State aid to "the 
families of dis-abled soldiers and the families of the 
slain." Passed; and Messrs. Cushman of Ward 1, 
Collins of Ward 2, Gordon of Ward 3, Sprague of 
Ward 4, Jennings of Ward 5, Kimball of Ward 6, Bar- 
ry of Ward 7, Brown of Ward 8, Peabody of Ward 9, 
Leach of Ward 10, Cudworth of Ward 11, Walbridge 
of Ward 12. Wilbur of Ward 13, Sweat of Ward 14, 
Fuller of Ward 15, Perkins of Ward 16. Minot of 
Ward 17, Moley of Ward 19, Sibley of Ward 20, Pray 
of Ward 21, Hicks of Ward 22, were appointed said 
committee. 

Severally acted upon in concurrence. 

Certificate of the election of a Committee on Ac- 
counts on the part of the Board of Aldermen. Laid 
on the table, on motion of Mr. Loring of Ward 12. 

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 

The second monthly report of the Board of Fire 
Commissioners was submitted, giving details of the 



JANUARY 8 



1874 



fires and alarms during the monlh of December. 
Whole number of alarms during the month 34, in- 
cluding 23 still ilarms; loss on buildings, $'4,164; 
insurance on do.. $10,589; loss on stock, $8130 50; 
insurance on do., $0447 50; number of alarms during 
month of December, 1872, 46. 

Laid on the table and ordered printed, on motion 
of Mr. Noyes of Ward 5. 

RESIGNATION. 

A communication was received from Charles J. 
Prescott resigning his position as Trustee at large of 
the City Hospital. 

On motion of Mr. Page of Ward 9, the resigaatiou 
was accepted and the communication sent up. 

COMMITTEE ON FINANCE. 

Mr. Davis of Ward 14, from the special committee 
appointed to nominate members of the Joint Stand- 
ing Committee on Finance, submitted a report, rec- 
ommending the election of William H. West of Ward 
16, George P. Denny of Ward 9, Benjamin Dean of 
Ward 12, Charles E. Powers of Ward 4. Halsey J. 
Boardman of Ward 14, Francis H. Peabody of Ward 
9, and Francis Hnnnewell of Ward 19. 

Mr. Loring of Ward 12— As one of the committee 
on nomination, I would say that Mr. Weston of 
Ward 1, who was a member of the Finance Commit- 
tee last year, and who was a member of two other 
important committees, and also a Director of the 
East Boston Ferries, has declined a renomination 
that a gentleman who is a member of one of the 
largest banking Arms in the city may be elected a 
member of this committee Mr. Weston also desired 
to make room on the committee for a member of the 
Council from one of the new wards. It is due to that 
gentleman that these facts should be stated, as they 
SHOW a sensitive regard for the feelings and rights of 
others. 

The report was accepted, and on motion of Mr. 
Barnes of Ward 11 the Council at eight o'clock pro- 
ceeded, according to special assignment, to ballot for 
members of the Committee on Finance. The presi- 
dent appointed Messrs. Barnes of Ward 11, Loring of 
Ward 12 and Bent of Ward 2 a committee to receive, 
sort and count votes. They reported the following 
result: 

Whole number of votes 71 

Necessary to a choice , 36 

William H. West 70 

George P. Denny 71 

Benjamin Dean 71 

Charles E, Powers 71 

Halsey J. Boardman 71 

Francis H. Peabody 71 

Francis Hunne well 71 

George A.Shaw 1 

Messrs. West, Denny, Dean, Powers, Boardman, 
Peabody and Hunnewell weie declared elected. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED 

By Mr. Abbott of Ward 3— Petition of the officers 
of Battery A, Boston Light Artillery, for new armory. 

By Mr. Davis of Ward 14 -Petition of Captain H. 
A. Thomas, for new armory for Company D. First 
Battalion of Infantry. 

Severally laid on the table. 

COMMITTEE ON ACCOUNTS. 

Mr. Wilbur of Ward 9, from the special committee 
appointed to nominate a Committee on Accounts, 
submitted a report recommending the election of 
James J. Flynn of Ward 7, Frederick Pease of Ward 
1, J. Q. A. Brackett of Ward 10, Amos L. Noyes of 
Ward 5, William H. Kent of Ward 21. 

The report was accepted, and at half-past eight 
o'clock, on motion of Mr. Burditt of Ward 16, the 
Council proceeded, by special assignment made at the 
last meeting, to ballot for a Committee on Accounts. 
The President appointed Messrs. Burditt of Ward 16, 
Weston of Ward 1 and Crocker of Ward 6 a commit- 
tee to receive, sort and count votes, and they report- 
ed the following as the result of the ballot: 

Whole number of votes 70 

Necessary to a choice 36 

James .J. Flynn , 68 

Frederick Pease 69 

J. Q. A. Brackett 70 

Amos L. Noyes 69 

William H. Kent 70 

G. A. Shaw ; 2 

J. K. Crowley 2 

Messrs. Flynn, Pease, Brackett, Noyes and Kent 
were declared elected. 

THE POST-OFFICE EXTENSION. 

On motion of Mr. Flynn of Ward 7— 

Whereas, The United States Government did, on 
the 3d of March last, make an appropriation to pay 
for land to extend the new Poet-OlBce site in this 
city, the only condition to said extension being the 



widening of certain streets adjoining the said site; 
and 

Whereas, The condition has been fully complied 
with on the part of this city at an expense of at least 
half a million dollars, incurred solely with a view to 
.the enlargement of the Post Office'; and 

Whereas, The amount appropriated by the Govern- 
ment has been found insufficient to properly, com- 
pensate the owners 5f the lands required for tlie ex- 
tension; and 

Whereas, A reoort was made by the Sub-Committee 
on Appropriations to the House of Representatives 
on the 6th inst., recommending that no additional 
appropriation be made by Congress for the purchase 
of additional land — 

Resolved, That, in the opinion of the City, Council 
of Boston, the faith of the United States Govern- 
ment is fully pledged to extend the Post Office to 
Congress street, as provided in the act of Marca a, 
1873, and to make reasonable and just compensation 
for the lands taken for that purpose. 

Ordered, That a committee consisting of three 
members of the Common Council, with such as the 
Aldermen may join, be appointed to appear before 
the Committee on Appropriations at VVashington, 
and represent the views of the City Governmeut and 
citizens of Boston as to the importance of enlarging 
the Post Office as originally proposed; and that his 
Honor the Mayor be requested to accompany said 
committee; the expense attending the same to be 
charged to the appropriation for Incidentals. 

The order was read once. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7—1 ask for a suspension of the 
rules that the order may be passed this evt^nihg. A 
despatch has been sent to ex-Mayor Pierce asking 
him to request the Congressional Committee on Ap? 
propriations not to take further st'^ps in the matter 
until some action has been taken by the City Couij- 
cil of Boston. Mr. Pierce has replied that the com- 
mittee have agreed to the sugges ion made by hiin. 
It is the opinion of those who have charge of this mat- 
ter that if a committee be appointed by the City 
Council to go there, they may possibly get tiiis 
appropriation through— that is, if they go immedi- 
ately. I therefore move that the rules be suspendad,. 

The rules were suspended, the resolve and or^er 
were passed, and Messrs. Flynn of .Ward 7, Dean ,of, 
Ward 12, and Boardman of Ward 14 were appointed 
said committee. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEES. 

On motion of Mr. Pease of Ward 1-^ 

Ordered, That Messrs. , with such as the 

Board of Aldermen may join, be a . committee , to 
nominate candidates for Directors of the East Bo!-ton 
ferries. 

Passed, and Messrs. Pease of W'ard 1, Train of 
Ward IS, and Brackett of Ward 10 were appointed 
said committee. 

On motion of Mr. Martin of Ward 7— 

Ordered, That Messrs. , with such as the 

Board of Aldermen may join, be a committee to 
nominate Superintendents of Bridges. 

Passed, and Messrs. Martin of Ward 7, Day of 
Ward 1, and Walbridge of Ward 12 were appointed 
said committee. 

On motion of Mr. Harrington of VVard 8— 

Ordered, That Messrs. . with such as the 

Board of Aldermen may join, be appointed a commit- 
tee to nominate a Harbor Master. 

Passed, and Messrs. Harrington of Ward 8, Abbott 
of Ward 3, and Sibley of Ward 20 were appointed 
said committee. 

On motion of Mr. Cawley of Ward 2— 

Ordered, That Messrs. , with such as the 

Board of Aldermen may join, be appointed a com- 
mittee to nominate Weighers ana Inspectors of 
Ballast. 

Passed, and Messrs. Cawley of Ward 2, Warren of 
Ward 12, and Cushman of Ward 1 were appointed 
said committee. 

On motion of Mr. Flatley of Ward 4— 

Ordered, That Messrs. , with such as the 

Board of Aldermen may join, be a committee to 
nominate a Superintendent of Common and Public 
Squares. 

Passed, and Messrs. Flatley of Ward 4, Noyes of 
Wards, and Moley of Ward 19 were appointed said 
committee. 

On motion of Mr. Woods of Ward 8 — 

Ordered, That Messrs. , with such as the 

Board of Aldermen may join, be appointed a com- 
mittee to nominate a Superintendent of Public Build- 
ings. 

Passed, and Messrs. Woods of Ward 8, Morse of 
Ward 13, and Crowley of Ward 7 were appointed 
said committee. 

On motion of Mr. Noyes of Ward 5— 

Ordered. That Messrs. , with such as, 



6 



COMMON COTJISrCIL. 



the Board of Aldermen may join, be appointed a 
committee to nominate a Cocliitiiate Water Board. 

Pasi^ed, and Messrc. Noyep> of Ward 5, Powers of 
Ward 4, and Willcatt of Ward 17 were appointed 
said cominiriee. 

On motion cf Mr. Ttiacher of Ward IB- 
Ordered, That Messrs. , with such as the 

Board of Aldermen may join, be a commit ee to 
nominate a candidate for City Messenger. 

Passed, and Messrs. Thacher of Ward 15, Barnes of 
Ward 11. and Wilbur of Ward 13 were appointed 
said committee. 

On ruction of Mr. Collins of Ward 2- 

Ordered, That Messrs. , with such as the 

Board of Aldermen may join, be appointed a com- 
mittee to nominate Trustees of the City Hospital. 

Passed, and Messrs. Collins of Ward 2, Denny of 
Ward it, and Bearce of Ward 11 were appointed said 
committee. 

On motion of Mr. Bleiler of Ward 15 — 

Ordered, That Messrs. , with such as the 

Board of Aldermen may join, be appointed a com- 
mittee to nominate a Superintendent of Streets. 

Passed, and Messrs. Bleiler of Ward 15, Woodward 
of Ward 13, and Dacey of Ward 20 were appointed 
said committee. 

On motion of Mr. Davis of Ward 14— 

Ordered, That Messrs. , with such as the 

Board of Aldermen may join, be appointed a com- 
mittee to nominate a Fire Commission. 

Mr. Page of Ward 9— As that is a matter entirely 
in the hands of the Mayor, I move the indefinite 
postponement of the order. Carried. 

On motion of Mr. West of Ward 16— 

Ordered, That Messrs. , with such as the 

Board of Aldermen may join, be a committ.e to 
nominate Trustees of the Mt. Hope Cemetery. 

Passed, and Messrs. West of Ward 16, Page of 
Ward 9, and Minot of Ward 17 were appointed said 
committee. 

On motion of Mr. Wilbur of Ward 9, the order to 
appoint a committee to nominate a Board of Direct- 
ors of Public Institutions was taken from the table, 
amended so as to consist of five members on the part 
of the Council, and as amended passed. Messrs. 
Whiston of Ward 8, Wilbur of Ward 9. Plynn of 
Ward 7, Pray of Ward 21, and Hunnewell of Ward 
19 were ajjpointed said committee. 

On motion of Mr, Thactier of Ward 15 • - 

Ordered, That Messrs. . with such as the 

Board of Aldermen may join, be a committee to nom- 
inate a candidate for Superintendent of Common 
Sewers. 

Pasfied, and Messrs. Thacher of Ward 15, Adams 
of Ward 14, and Hine of Ward 6 were appointed said 
committee. 



On motion of Mr. Page of Ward 9— 

Ordered, That Messrs. . with such as the 

Board of Aldermen may join, be appointed to nom- 
inate Trustees of the Public Library. 

Passed, and Messrs. Paije of Ward 9, Sprague of 
Ward 4, and Croclier of Ward 6 were appointed said 
committee. 

A PERSONAL EXPLANATION. 

The President— The Chair will take this opportn 
nity, with the permission of the Council, to make a 
personal explanation. It has come to my knowledge 
that some portions of my opening remarks at tne 
organization of the Council, in regard to the con- 
duct of the canvass for the presidency, have been 
mi8Con>trued, as referring to my honorable oppo- 
nent, the gentleman from Wara 14, and his imme- 
diate friends in this Council, It is my pleasure and 
my duty to take this earliest opportunity to disavow 
all intention of reflecting upon him, or upon them, 
in what I then said. It did not occur to me that my 
language was capable of such an interpretation. I 
simply intended to denounce in direct terms the un- 
worthy means that were resorted to by persons out- 
side of this Council in inventing and circulating re- 
ports concerning me I did not then, nor do I now, 
believe, that any member of this Council was a party 
to the dishonorable tactics that may have been used, 
and I am certain that my friend, Mr. Boardman, did 
not participate in them, and I regret that any words 
of mine should have conveyed a wrong impression 
to any one. 

OKDERS PRESENTED. 

On motion of Mr. Hunnewell of Ward 19— 

Ordered, That the Committee on Fire Alarms be re- 
quested te consider the expediency of extending the 
fire-alarm telegraph into the 19th Ward as soon as 
practicable. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Buildings 
be requested to consider ti'e immediate necessity of 
providing suitable police stations for the 19th Ward. 

Severally laid on the table, on motion of Mr. Hun- 
newell of Ward 19. 

auditor's MONTHLY EXHIBIT. 

The Chair presented the Auditor's monthly exhibit 
for December (City Doc. No. 3). It was sent up. 
Following is a recapitulation of the expenditures for 
the month: 

Appropriations, 

Revenues, etc. Expended. Unexpended. 

General $11,2.S1,615 86 * 8,242,113 17 $2,969.502 69 

Special 9.493,26146 5,262,559 18 4,2.30,702 28 



j;20,724,877 32 $13,504,672 35 
On motion of Mr. Flatley of Ward 4, 
adjourned. 



?7,220,204 97 
the Council 



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' :j i.;i'':'i" 



BOARD OF ALDKRMEN, 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceediiig:s of the Board of Aldermen, 

JANUARY 12, 1874. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Alder- 
men was held at lour o'clock P. M. today, his Honor 
Mayor Cobb in the chair. 

RULES AND ORDEE8. 

Alderman Clark, from the commitee to prepare 
rules and orders for the government of the Board 
during the municipal year, submitted a report recom- 
mending the passage of the accompanying order. 

Ordered, That the rules and orders of the last 
Board of Alderman be adopted as the rules and orders 
of this board, with the following amendment, name- 
ly: Insert in section 24, after the word "remon- 
strances" "3d— Unfinished business of preceding 
meetings." 

The order was passed. 

Alderman Cutter submitted report (printed City 
Document No. 8) from the joint special committee 
appointed to prepare rules and orders for the gov- 
ernment of the City Council during the ensuing 
municipal year, who having considered the subject 
recommend that the following changes be made in 
the rules and orders of the last City Council, namely: 

Changing the name of the committee on "institu- 
tions at South Boston and Deer Island," to "Public 
Institutions." 

Making the Committee on Fire Department to 
consist of two Aldermen and three Councilmen, so as 
to conform to the new Are ordinance. 

Striking out the Committee on Fire Alarms, that 
department having been consolidated with the Fire 
Department. 

Increasing the Committees on Inspection of Build- 
ings and Armories from five to eight members, on 
account of the additional duties devolving upon 
them by the growth of the city. 

Requiring the Committee on Finance to report 
upon all requests for adi.itional appropriations, 
transfers or loans. 

Requiring joint committees to report to the board 
in which the subject of theii report originated. 

Requiring reports to be signed by a member of the 
committee belonging to the body to which the report 
is presented. 

Requiring notice to be given by the clerks when 
any ordinance, order or resolution originating in one 
branch is rejected in the other. 

Accompanying the report was ;an order covering 
the proposed changes in the rules. 

Tne order was passed, and his honor the Mayor, in 
accordanca therewith, appointed the following-named 
Aldermen as members on the part of the Board of 
the 

JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Armories — Aldermen Worthington, ClaiV, Hall. 

Assessors' DepartmeKt — Aldermen Harris, Cutter, 
Stebbins. 

Bathing — Aldermen Power, Brooks, Prescott. 

Claims — Aldermen Cutter, Worthingto.*., Brooks. 

Common, etc. — Aldermen Clark, Power, Bigelow. 

Femes — Aldermen Emery. Stebbins, Brooks. 

Engineer's Department — Aldermen Bigelow, Cut- 
ter. 

Fire Department — Aldermen Harris, Bigelow. 

Fuel — Aldermen Peters, Prescott. 

Harbor — Aldermen Brooks, Harris. 

Health — Aldermen Worthington, Power. 

City Hospital — Aldermen Clark, Hall. 

Institutions — Aldermen Worthington, Cutter, Pres- 
cott. 

Mount Hope Cemetery — Aldermen Peters, Hall. 

Legislative Matters — Aldermen Stebbins, Worth- 
ington 

Ordinances— Aldermen Bigelow, Hal', Peters. 

Overseers of the Poor — Aldermen Hall, Harris. 

Public Buildings — Aldermen Emery, Clark, Pres- 
cott. 

Public Instruction — Aldermen Prescott, Cutter, 
Worthington. 

Public Lands — Aldermen Emery, Stebbins, Brooks. 

Public Library — Aldermen Peters, Emery, Pres- 
cott. 

Printing — Aldermen Power, Worthington. 

Salaries — Aldermen Stebbins, Prescott. 

Streets — Aldermen Clark, Harris, Worthington. 

Surveyor's Department — Aldermen Hall, Emery. 

Survey and Inspection of Buildings — Aldermen 
Brooks, Power, Hall. 

Treasury Department — Aldermen Peters, Brooks. 

Water — Aldermen Stebbiils, Clark, Bigelow. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD Or ALDERMEN. 

Bridges— Aldermen Cutter, Power, Harris. 

Cemeteries— Aldermen Stebbins, Peters, Hall. 

County Accounts — Aldermen Harris, Stebbins, 
Bigelow. 

Faneuil Hall, etc.— Aldermen Emery, Clark, Pres- 
cott. 

Lamps— Aldermen Hall, Emery, Peters. 

Licenses — Aldermen Bigelow, Stebbins, Emery. 

Markets, etc.— Aldermen Prescott, Worthington, 
Harris. 

Paving— Aldermen Cutter, Power, Peters. 

Police— Aldermen Cutter, Clark, Peters. 

Sewers— Aldermen Power, Bigelow, Harris. 

Steam Engines — Aldermen Brooks, Power, Emery. 

Streets-Aldermen Clark, Harris, Worthington. 

PRO.IECTING SIGNS. 

The following was submitted: ' 

To the Board of Aldermen of the City of Boston — 
I transmit herewith a report from the Chief of Police 
in relation to signs projecting over the streets in the 
"burnt district," so-called. I would suggest the pro- 
priety of taking some action to restrain the occu- 
pants of buildings on this district from entering into 
a useless competition in using the public streets 
(which have been widened at great expense by the 
city) for the display of projecting signs and barriers. 
Added to the fact that such projections are liable to 
become dangerous to public travel, they disfigure the 
beautiful buildings which all the citizens of Boston 
take pride in having appear to the best advantage. 
Samoel C. Cobb, Mayor. 

The report of the Chief of Police, accompanying 
the message, gives the street and number where such 
signs project, the name of the proprietor and the dis- 
tance the sign projects from the building. There are 
forty-nine signs reported. The Chief says, "I cannot 
learn that any one claims to have had permission, 
expressed or implied, for putting out any of these 
signs." 

The communication and report were referred to the 
Committee on Police. 

EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 

■ Constables- Joel F. Cotton, Edward Glafling, Isaac 
Jacobs, George E. Haynes, George A. Walker, Nich- 
olas G. Lynch, William T. Gardner, Perez R. Jacobs, 
George E. Cutler, James Miskelley. 

Special Police Otticers Without Pay — John L. 
Brockway, for Suffolk Market: John McOarty. Long- 
wood avenue and its vicinity. 

Railroad Police Officer — Frank Moulton, Boston & 
Albany Railroad. 

Undertaker— Bernard E. Murray of West Roxbury 
District. 

Severally confirmed. 

Mayor's Clerk— James L. Hillard. 

BONDS APPROVED. 

The bonds of Stephen P. Kelley, Caleo B. Watts, 
Joseph H. Knox, David M. R.Dow, John M. Hodgate, 
Charles Buicham, constables, and Charles W. Kim- 
ball, Assistant-Register of Deeds, being duly certi- 
fied, were approved by the Board. 

PETITIONS REFERRED. 

To the Committee on Claims. Timothy Gunning et 
a/., to be paid for work done on the highways in 
West Roxbury during the latter portion of Decem- 
ber, 187.3. 

To the Committee on Crnnrnxm on the Part of the 
Board, Elisha T. Lonng, for leave to cut down trees 
on Ashland street, Ward 16. 

Charles H. Bolles et. al , for removal of tree from 
the south side of Waverley street. 

To the Committee on Paving. William Hyland, to 
be paid for grade damages on Regent street. 

Frank P. Ordway et at., for crossing stones across 
Dorchester avenue from Cottage street to Crescent 
avenue. 

John McCarthy, to be paid for grade damages on 
Dorchester avenue, near Linden street. 

Hersey, Washburn & Co. et al , remonstrance 
against having swing signs projecting over Federal 
street. 

To the Committee on County Buildings. Social Law 
Library, for use of an additional room in the Court 
House. 

To the Committee on Health on the Part of the Board. 
Walter Smith, to occupy wooden stable for four 
horses on Fourth street, No. 946. 

James L. Miller, to occupy wooden stable for seven 
horses on Middle street. Ward 12. 

Joseph Sidwell, to occupy wooden stable for one 
horse on Webster street. No. 174. 

William Kellev et al., remonstrance against pro- 
posed erection of a stable at 839 Fourth street by J. 
H. Wigglesworth. 



J ANU AE.Y la 



1874r 



8 



John O'Shaughuessy et al remonstrance against 
erection of stable by James L. Miller on Middle 
fit>r66t 

J. M. Smith, to occupy a riding-school stable for 
eixtv-four horses in rear of 1043 Washington street; 
also petitions of Daniel Denny, Jr., et al., and Mrs. 
Nathiinel Walker, et al.. in aid of same. 

John Butland, to occupy wooden stable for one 
horse on H street, rear No. 90. 

ORDER OF NOTICE. 

On the petition of George W. Simmons & Son, for 
leave to erect and use a stationary engine at Oak 
Hall, an order of notice was passed for a hearing on 
Monday, Februarj 2, at 4 P. M. 

REPORTS OF CITY OFFICERS. 

Reports of city officers were submitted, abstracts 
of which are herewith appended: 

Paijinader of State Aid. For the months of Octo- 
ber, November and December— Balance on band 
October 1, .$405: received from the Treasurer, $18,500; 
disbursed, $18, ()70; leaving balance on band of $235; 
total iiuml)er of applicants, ;W50. 

Annual Reports of Suiierintendents of Bridges. 
Federal sti-eet— Vessels paffsed through the draw, 
.94:30; days m'ii, nights 2797. Dover street— Total 
number of vessels passed through. 6844. Broadway 
Bridge— Total vessels passed through, 7074. Meridian 
street— Total vessels, 2483. Washington-avenue 
Bridge— Total vessels, 13,1:32. Chelsea street— Total 
vessels, 7. 

Weighers and Inspectors of Lighters. Receipts for 
the quarter ending December 31, $814 05; expenses, 
$2:35; lighters inspected, 181. 

Superintendent of Lamps. The annual report of 
the Superintendent of Lamps was submitted, con- 
taining a tabalar statement of the expenditures of 
the department during the past municipal year, a 
tatjle showing the expenditures in detail for the past 
seven years, and one showing the compaiatiye net 
increase in the number of the public lamps, together 
with such general information as may be i«f interest 
relating to the department. The department is be- 
lieved to be in good condition, and the men employ- 
ed are as a general thing prompt and faithful in the 
discharge of the duties required of them. The past 
year has been one of activity in this department, on 
account of the removal of and replacing himps on 
many of the s'reets in the •'tire district." and the 
new sections of the city. The supplies and fixtures to 
many lamps in the city have been renewed; large 
numbers of them being small and decayed from long 
use. Many iron posts have been set in place of un- 
sightly and decayed wooden ones. The contracts 
have not been changed with the gas companies dur- 
ing the year, awd the only change made since the 
contract with the Dorchester Gas Light Company, in 
November, 1870, has been in the removal of the 
United States tax. There are one hundred and six 
men employed in the department distributed as fol- 
lows: Gas lamps — city proper 47, South Bost<m 9, 
East Boston 6, Roxbury 19, Dorchester 12, Brookline 
1. Fluid lamps— city proper 2. Siiuth Boston 3, East 
Boston 2, Roxbury 1. Dorchester 3. 

The following tables will show the number of gas 
lamos in use in the various sections of the city, on 
the 15th of December, 1873, as compared with the six 
previous years: 

1867. 1868. 1869. 1870. 1871. 1872. 1873. 

City Proper 2.948 3,015 3,155 3245 3,371 3,453 3,624 

East Boston.... 350 358 377 404 416 434 458 
South Boston.. 439 452 487 517 591 642 696 

Roxbury 567 589 707 838 930 1078 1,191 

Dorchester., 314 401 580 692 760 

Brookhne 45 47 

Totals 4,304 4,414 5,040 5,045 5,888 6,344 6,776 

The increase in the separate sections of the city, 
as above, has been as follows: In 1873, city proper, 
171; East Boston, 24; South Boston, 54; Roxbury, 
113: Dorchester, 68; Brookline, 2; total, 4:32. 

There are now 806 fluid lamps in use, distributed 
as follows: City proper 131, East Boston 294, South 
Boston 248, Roxbury 60, Dorchester 73— a net total 
decrease during the year of 34. The laying of new 
mains by the gas comnanles is gradually causing the 
almost useless lighting of the streets with fluid to be 
abandoned, and it is to be hoped that a liberal course 
will be pursued by these corporations, to the end that 
all our streets may be lighted in a proper and satis- 
factory manner. The appropriation for the financial 
year ending on the 30th of April next, was .$.390,000; 
amount expended to date, $264,074 65; balance un- 
expended, $125,925 35. 

Severally sent up. 

Chief -of -Police. Arrests for quarter ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1873, 6920; males, 5547; females, 1373; Ameri- 
cans, 2511; foreigners, 4409; non-residents, 1610; mi- 
nors, 1209; committed. 4607; lodgers, 15,845; males, 



13,966; females, 1879; Americans, 6333; foreigners, 
9512; non-residents. 12,931; minors, 1998. Amount 
of property taken from prisoners and lodgers and 
restored, $18,775 22; property reported stolen in the 
city, $19,256; property recovered which was stolen 
in and out of the city, $18,336 01; fines imposed by 
the courts. $16,518; amount of imprisonment im- 
posed, 4.35 years 5 months; amount received for dog 
licenses, $307; expendituies of the department for 
the quarter, $166,452 26; balance of appropriation in 
treasury, $198,0:37 90. 
Placed on file. 

PAPERS PBOM THE COMMON COUNCLL. 

Order for copy of the Mayor's Address. Passed. 

Order for adoption of Joint Rules of 1873 until 
otherwise ordered. Passed. 

Order for the preparation of the Municipal Regis- 
ter for this year, also for a pocket edition of Rules 
and Orders and of Committees. Passed. 

Order for reference of unfinished .joint business to 
the several standing committees. Passed. 

Resolve and order for appointment of a special 
Committee (Messrs. Flynn, Dean and Boardman, 
with such as this Board may join), to proceed to 
Washington and urge the General Government to 
carry out the proposed enlargement of the LTnited 
States Post Oftice. Passed, and Aldermen Clark and 
Worthington joined to the committee. 

Resignation of Charles J. Prescott as trustee at 
large of the City Hospital. Accepted. 

Order referring all matters of an unfinished nature 
in the hands of the joint standing committees to 
the corresponding committees of the present year. 
Passed. 

Auditor's exhibit of state of the several appropria- 
tions on January 5, 1874, (City Doc. No. 3.) Placed 
on file. 

COMMITTEES JOINED. 

Various orders for the appointment of special com- 
mittees to nominate city oiiicers were received from 
the Common Council and passed in concurrence, and 
the following appointments made by his Honor the 
Mayor in accordance therewith: 

Mayor's Address— Aldermen Clark, Power, Steb- 
bins. 

Harbor Master — Aldermen Power, Hall. 

Weighers and Inspectors of Ballast and Lighters, 
etc. — Aldermen Brooks, Peters. 

Superintendent of Common, etc.— Aldermen Clark, 
\\ ortiiiiifjton. 

Superintendent of Public Buildings — Aldermen 
Emery. Prescott. 

Water Board— Aldermen Stebbins, Bigelow. 

City Messenger- Aldermen Bigelow, Emery. 

Trustees of the City Hospital — Aldermen Clark. 
Harris. 

Superintendent of Streets — Aldermen Cutter, Pow- 
er. 

Superii tendent of Bridges— Aldermen Power, Har- 
ris. 

Directors of East Boston Ferries— Aldermen Eme- 
ery. Cutter. 

Trustees of Mt. Hope Cemetery- Aldermen Peters, 
Hall. 

Directors for Public Institutions— Aldermen Cut- 
ter. Worthington, Prescott. 

Superintendent of Sewers - Aldermen Prescott, 
Bigelow. 

Trustees of Public Library— Aldermen Bigelow, 
Peters. 

REPORTS AND ORDERS. 

On motion of Alderman Emery — 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Public Build- 
ings, under the dir'-ction of the Committee on Pub- 
lic Buildings on the part of the Board of Aldermen, 
be authorized to fit up for the accommodation of the 
Sheriff of Suflblk County and his assistants, the two 
rooms formerly occupied by the Probate Register, in 
the southeast corner of the Court House; the expense 
to be chargeu to the appropriations for the County of 
Suffolk. Passed. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Faneuil Hall be 
requested to report to this Board a new series of regu- 
lations for the use of said hall. 

Passed. 

On motion of Alderman Cutter — 

Ordered, That the Committee on Ordinances re- 
port what amendments are necessary to the ordinance 
in relation to bridges, to enable the City Council to 
elect superintendents of Chelsea Bridge, Warren 
Bridge, Charles-River Bridge, Prison-Point Bridge 
and Maiden Bridge. 

Passed. 

Ordered, That the officers and members of the Po- 
lice Department in Brighton, Charleetown and West 
Roxbury receive the same compensation per month 
as the corresponding officers and members of the Po- 



9 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



lice Department in this city, except that the officers 
in charfjo of the said departments in tlie flrstnamed 
localities slia'.l receive the pay of captains in the Po- 
lice Department. 

Passed. 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor he authorized, 
with the approval of the Committee on Claims, to 
draw upon the City Treasurer for the payment of all 
executions or juds;ments of court against the city 
when properly certified as correct by the City Scflici- 
tor. 

Passed. 

On motion of Alderman Power — 

Whereas, It appears to this Board that a necessity 
exists for the construction of a sewer in Merchants' 
row. between State and Chatham streets, it is hereby 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Sewers be 
and he is hereby directed to construct a common 
sewer in said Merchants' row and to report a sched- 
ule of the expense thereof to this Board. 

Passed. 

On motion of Alderman Bigelow — 

Ordered, That the Board of Aldermen be and they 
are tiereby authorized, in accordance with section 14, 
chapter 50, of the General Statutes, to make rules 
and regulations to restrain sales by minors, or to 
grant licenses for minors to make such sales, on such 
terms and conditions as they shall prescribe. 

Passed. 

On motion of Alderman Emery — 

Ordered, Thiit the Town Hall in West Roxbury be 
leased by the Superintendent of Public Buildings to 
any proper parties who may- apply for the use 
of said hall for the purposes of exhibi- 
tions, concerts, etc., at such rates per night 
and on such conditions as the Committee on Public 
Buildings may prescribe. The receipts from this 
source, after the deduction of all expcuses incident 
thereto to be paid by said Superintendent, quarterly, 
into the city treasury. 

Passed. 

On motion of Alderman Clark — 

Ordered, That whenever the Committee on Streets 
of this Board deem it for the best interest of the 
city to refer claims for damages or betterments 
relating to the laying out or widening of streets to 
arbitration for settlement, the said committee is 
hereby authorized to refer such claims, with the ap- 
proval of his Honor the Mayor and the City Solicitor. 

Passed. 

Alderman Bigelow, from the Committee on 
Licenses, reported in tavor of granting the applica- 
tions of W. H. Mason & Co., for auctioneers' license 
at 41 Tremont street; A. Harmon, to give exhibition 



of magic at John A. Andrew Hall, Pebuary 25; A. K. 
Adams, to give dramatic exhibition at Sumner Hall, 
January 13; A. P. Peck, to give three concerts at 
Music Hall, January la. 13 and 10; Smith <k Wright, 
for victualler's license at corner of Court and Brattle 
streets; C. H. Starkey, for auctioneers' license at 
corner Travers and iieverly streets; Charles A. 
Buyland, to keep intelligence office at 11 Staniford 
street. Severally accepted. 

Alderman Clark submitted orders to pay for street 
damages as follows: Charles Pope, for land taken in 
name of heirs of Joseph Bumstead $183 78, widening 
Magazine street; Mutual Life Insurance Company of 
New York, $37,926, widening Pearl street; Charles 
Pope, trustee for heirs of Joseph Bumstead, $357 22, 
widening Magazine street; James Parker. $1,599, 
widening Pearl street; Susan C. Wheelright, $2430 75, 
widening Pearl street; E. L. Perkins, $.502, extension 
of Thornton street; William F. Weld, $55,015, exten- 
sion of Franklin street to Pearl street and widening 
Federal street. Severally read once. 

On motion of Alderman Bigelow— 

Ordered, That all matters of an unfinished nature 
relating to the improvement on Fort Hill be referred 
to a special committee, consisting of the chairmen of 
the'.Committees on Streets, Paving and Sewers, to be 
called the Special Committee on Fort-Hill Improve- 
ment, with authority to exercise all the powers re- 
lating to settlements for contracts, work and other 
matters relating thereto, and also all matters relating 
to the erection of temporary structures on land be- 
longing to the city on the Fort-Hill Territory, which 
were held by the special committee of the Board of 
Aldermen of 1873. 

Passed. 

On motion of Alderman Stebbins — 

Ordered, That the several standing committees of 
this Board resume the unfinished business of last 
year which is appropriate to said committees. 

Passed. 

Alderman Stebbins announced that the Joint Com- 
mittee on Accounts had organized by the choice of 
Alderman Claik as chairman. 

On motion of Alderman Bigelow — 

Ordered, That a joint special committee, consist- 
ing of two members of the Board of Aldermen, with 
such as the Common Council may join, be appointed 
to have charge of the erection of the army and navy 
monument on Boston Common, as provided in the 
contract with Martin Milmore. 

Passed, and Aldermen Bigelow and Stebbins were 
appointed on the part of the Board. 

On motion of Alderman Clark, the Board adjourned. 



10 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

JANUARY 15, 1874. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common Coun- 
cil was hold (it half-past seven o'clock P. M. The 
Council was called to order by Mr. Shaw of Ward 5, 
the senior member, the President being absent. 

ELECTION OF PRESIDENT PHU TEM. 

On motion of Mr. Noyes of Ward 5, the Council 
proceeded to ballot for a president pro tem. The 
Chair appointed Messrs. Noyes of Ward 5, Martin of 
Ward 7 and Sibley of Ward 20 a committee to receive, 
sort and count votes. They reported as follows: 

Whole number of votes 57 

Necessary to a choice ...29 

George P. Denny 25 

Benjamin Dean 22 

W. H. Kent 1 

George A.Shaw 5 

James J. Flynn 1 

J. K. Crowley 1 

C. A. Burdltt 1 

H. G. Denny 1 

And there was no choice. 
A second ballot resulted as follows: 

Whole number of votes 70 

Necessary to a choice 36 

George P. Denny 36 

Benjamin Dean 28 

George A.Shaw 4 

James J. Flynn 2 

Mr. Denny was declared- elected. 

At the request of the Chair, Mr. Dean of Ward 12 
informed the President pro tem. of his election and 
escorted him to his seat. 

The President pro tem.— Gentlemen of the Com- 
mon Council: For the preference you have manifest- 
ed for me this evening, in electing me to the position 
of presiding officer of the Council pro tem., please 
accept my thanks. Called unexpectedly to preside, 
and without any recent familiarity with the duties of 
the position, I must therefore beg your kind indulg- 
ence, trusting that we shall get through the business 
of the evening as surely, if not as quickly, as usual. 

PAPEUS FROM THE BOARD OP ALDERMEN. 

Annual reports of ice Superintendents of Lamps 
and of the Chelsea-street, Mt. Washington-avenue, 
Meridian-street, Federal-street, Dover-street and 
Broadway bridges, and quarterly reports of the Pay- 
master of State Aid, and Weighers and Inspectors of 
Lighters. Severally placed on file. 

Petitions of Thomas W. Carter for renewal of lease, 
and Timothy Gunning for compensation for labor on 
streets in West Roxbury. Severally referred, in 
concurrence. 

Communication from the Mayor, appointing James 
L. Hillard as his clerk. Placed on file. 

Order authorizing the making of rules and regula- 
tions concerning sales by minors, as provided bylaw. 
Passed. 

Order for Committee on Ordinances to report what 
amendments are necessary to the ordinance to ena- 
ble the City Council to elect superintendents of the 
several bridges in Charlestown District. Passed. 

Order authorizing the Town Hall of West Roxbury 
to be leased by the Superintendent of Public Build- 
ings for the purposes of concerts, etc. Passed. 

Order authorizing the Mayor to draw upon the City 
Treasurer for the payment of executions or judg- 
ments against the city when certittea. Read once. 

Order for the monthly payment of the members of 
the Police Department in Brighton, Charlestown and 
West Roxbury. Passed, under a suspension of the 
rules, on motion of Mr. Pease of Ward 1. 

Order for the appointment of a committee on the 
subject of a soldiers' monument on Boston Common. 
Passed. 

Report on joint rules and orders of the City Coun- 
cil recommending certain changes in the rules and 
orders of last year, and an order covering said 
changes. Passed. 

Various orders for the appointment of joint stand- 
ing committees came down passed, and, being read 
once, on motion of Mr. Page of Ward 9, they were 
severally laid over till the next meeting of the 
Council. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF SEALERS OP WEIGHTS AND 

MEASURES. 

The annual report of the Sealers of Weights and 
Measures was submitted (City Doc. No. 10) giving a 
schedule of the property in the department and the 



following exhibit of the expenditures during the 
year, as follows: 

For the Northern District— Horse-keeping, shoeing 
and medical attendance, $'ii:i 00; repairs on large 
wagon and harness, and exchange of harness, $;W 19; 
tolls and ferry tolls, $20 97; extra labor, c'arting, 
camphor, etc., $27 15; stationery, newspaper, adver- 
tising, and directory, $2(j 56; sealing weights, by 
State sealer, $8 00; salaries of sealer and assistant, 
$2800 00; total, $:j235 87. 

For the Southern District— Salary of sealer and as- 
sistant, $2800 00; horse-keepijig, etc, $ti4(j 30; repairs 
on wagon, $30 19; printing, stationery, advertising, 
etc., $26 20; tools, etc., $20 48; extra labor on coal 
scales, $21 00; total, $3544 17. 
Whole amount expended from January 1, 1873, to 

December 31, 1873, inclusive $6,780 04 

Appropriation for 1873 and '74 7,000 00 

Expended 5,123 59 

Balance unexpended January 1, 1874 $1,876 41 

On motion of Mr. Thacher of Ward 15. the report 
was sent up. 

ORGANIZATION OP COMMITTEES. 

Mr. Dean of Ward 12 announced that the Finance 
Committee had made choice of Mr. William H. West 
of Ward 16 as chairman on the part of the Common 
Council, and that Mr. Alfred T. Turner had been 
elected clerk. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 announced that the Commit- 
tee on Accounts had made choice of Mr. Frederick 
Pease of Ward 1 as chairman on the part of the 
Council. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

By the President pro tem — 

Petition of George W. Sherman et al., for recount 
of votes for Common Council in Ward 15. Referred 
to Committee on Elections, on motion of Mr. Perkins 
of Ward 16. 

Petition of Matthew O'Brien, to be compensated 
for personal injnries received by a fall in Pearl street. 
Referred to Committee on Claims, on motion of Mr. 
Wilbur of Ward 9. 

By Mr. Hine of Ward 6— 

Petition of Alexander Stiles of Chelsea for com- 
pensation for injuries to his horse caused by a defect 
in Warren Bridge. Referred to Committee on 
Claims. 

REPORTS OF NOMINATING COMMITTEES. 

Reports were submitted from joint special com- 
mittees to nominate candidates for various city 
officers, making nominations as follows: 

By Mr. Pease of Ward 1— 

For Directors of East Boston Perries— From the 
Beard of Aldermen, Solomon B. Stebbius; from the 
Common Council, Joshua Weston, Ebenezer Adams. 

By Mr. Noyes of Ward 5— 

For members of the Cochituate Water Board — 
from the Board of Aldermen, Leonard R. Cutter; 
From the Common Council, Edward P. Wilbur, Wil- 
liam G. Thacher. 

By Mr. West of Ward 16— 

For Trustees of Mount Hope Cemetery — From the 
Board of Aldermen, Alanson Bigelow; from the 
Common Council, David Whiston, William Minot, Jr. 

By Mr. Page of Ward 9— 

For Trustees of the Public Library— From the 
Board of Aldermen, John T. Clark; from the Com- 
mon Council, Charles A. Burditt, David P. Kimball. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 6 — As a member of this com- 
mittee [to nominate Trustees of the Public Library] 
I wish to say that some time between twelve and 
half-past twelve o'clock today, a notice was left at 
my house of a meeting of the committee at half-past 
one. As I happened to be out I did n't receive the 
notice until nearly one o'clock. I got to the City 
Hall about a quarter before two, and found that the 
business had been transacted and the gentlemen 
nominated as reported this evening. Another mem- 
ber of the committee did not receive his notice until 
about two o'clock. I understand that notice of a com- 
mittee meeting should be given about twenty-four 
hours before. I don't make these remarks to raise any 
objection to the gentlemen nominated, because they 
meet with my entire approval. But no member wha 
was at the meeting consulted with us or knew any- 
thing of our wishes in regard to the nomination, and 
they did not wait for us. It seems to be an, irregu- 
larity that ought not to be passed without notice. 
I hope the report will be accepted and the gentlemen 
nominated elected. 

Mr. Page of Ward 9— In justice to those of the 
committee present, I will state that they knew noth- 
ing about whether the gentlemen absent received 
their notices or not. The committee met at a quar- 
ter before two o'clock; a quorum was present and 
proceeded to business. If the gentlemen did not 



JA]SrXJAR,Y 15 



1874. 



11 



receive their notices it was the fault of somebody 
else, and not the committee'o. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 6—1 did not know wh(;nce 
the trouble came, and therefore felt free to speak of 
it. I only know the notice did not come to my office 
until twelve o'clock, and I did not get it till a little 
before one. 

By Mr. Collins of Ward 2— 

For Trustee* of the City Hospital— From the Board 
of Aldermen, Charles J. Prescott; from the Common 
Council, Hillman B. Barnes, William H. Kent. 

By Mr. Whiston of Ward 8— 

For Directors of Public Institutions— From the 
Board of Aldermeu, James Power; from the Common 
Council, Cyrus A. Page, Benjamin Dean; at largib (to 
fill vacancy), William Sayward. 

The reports were severally accepted. 

Mr. Noyes of Ward 5 moved to suspend ihe rules 
in regard to the election of members of the Cochitu- 
ate Water Board, that the Council might proceed te 
an election this evening. 

Mr. Bracbett of Ward 10— It seems to me that it 
would be better to let all these nominations lie over 
for a week. I don't say this on account of any ob- 
jection to the ticket presented, but I understand 
there are other candidates for the positions and they 
have not had time to prepare ballots. It would be 
nothing nn fair, at least, to let them go over on that 
account. Another reason is, the President is not 
here, and the committees have not been appointed. 
Some members of the Council might be governed in 
voting somewhat by a knowledge of how the Stand- 
ing Committees are constituted. 

Mr. Noyes of Ward .5— These three gentlemen nom- 
inated were all members of that Board last year. 
There are no other candidates for the office, and I 
thought it would be better to expedite business by 
getting this election out of the way. Still I don't 
wish to pi ess the motion if any one objects. 

The motion to suspend the rules was lost. 

TOPICS IN THE MATOR'8 ADDRESS. 

Mr. Burditt of Ward 16 presented two reports from 
the committee appointed to report what disposition 
should be made of the various recommendations in 
the Mayor's address; the majority, consisting of Al- 
derman Clark, Power and Stebbins, and Councilman 
Cawley, recommending the passage of the accompa- 
nying order: 

Ordered, That so much of the Mayor's address as 
relates to changes in the organization of the City 
Government be referred to the Commission on the 
Revision of the City Charter; so much as relates to 
the finances of the city, to the Committee on Finance; 
80 much as relates to an enlargement of the 
Water Works, to the Committee on Water; 
so much as relates to charitable and re- 
formatory institutions, to the Committee on 
Public Institutions; so much as relates to a tempo- 
rary place of detention for insane persons arrested 
by the police, to the Committee on Public Buildings; 
80 much as relates to the regulation and restraint of 
the liquor traffic, to the Committee on Legislative 
Matters: so much as relates to the low territory in 
the vicinity of Northampton street and Swett street, 
to the Joint Special Committee on the Northamp- 
ton-street District; so much as relates to a hospital 
for contagious and infectious diseases, to the Com- 
mittee on Health; so much as relates to the annexa- 
tion of Brookline and other towns and cities,- to the 
Committee on Legislative Matters; so much as re- 
lates to public parks, to the Committee on Common 
and Public Grounds; so much as relates to anew 
Court House and to increasing the efficiency of the 
Police Department, to the Board of Aldermeu. 

The minority report was signed by Councilman 
Burditt, Flynn and Kent, who dissent from so much 
of the majority as provides for the reference to the 
Committee on Common of the Mayor's recommend- 
ation in regard to public parks, and recommend the 
passage of the accompanying order: 

Ordered, That so much of the Mayor's address as 
refers to the establishment of public parks be re- 
ferred to a commission to consist of his Honor the 
Mayor, ex officio, two members of the Board of Alder- 
men and three members of the Common Council and 
three citizens at large, — the members on the part of 
the City Council to be elected by concurrent vote of 
the two branches, and those at large to be appointed 
by the Mayor, said commission to investigate the 
subject in all its bearings and to report as soon as 
practicable to the City Conncil. 

Mr. Burditt of Ward 16 moved to substitute the 
minority report for so much of the majority report 
as related to public parks. 

The motion prevailed, and the order recommended 
by the majority, as amended by the substitution of 
that of the minority, was passed. 



ORDERS rOB NOMINATING COMMITTEES. 

On motion of Mr. Shaw of Ward 5— 

Ordered, That Messrs. , with such as the 

Board of Aldermen may join, be appointed a com- 
mittee to nominate candidates for Overseers of the 
Poor. 

Passed. 

On motion of Mr. Burditt of Ward 16— 

Ordered, That Messrs. . with such as the 

Board of Aldermen may join, be a committee to 
nominate a candidate tor City Surveyor. 

Passed. 

On motion of Mr. Thacher of Ward 15— 

Ordered, That Messrs. , with such as the 

Board of Aldermen may join, be a committee to 
nominate a candidate for City Engineer, and that 
said committee be authorized to report to either 
branch of the City Council. 

Passed. 

On motion of Mr. Wilbur of Ward 13— 

Ordered, That Messrs. , with such as the 

Board of Aldermen may join, be a committee to 
nominate a candidate for Water Registrar, and that 
said committee be authorized to report to either 
branch of the City Council. 

Passed. 

EXTENSION OF PARKER STREET. 

On motion of Mr. Thacher of Ward 15— 

Ordered, That the Street Commissioners be re- 
■ quested to take such action as may be required to 
lay out as a public way Parker street from Beacon 
street to Tremont street. 

Passed. 

On motion of Mr. Pease of Ward 1-- 

Ordered, That the President of the Common Coun- 
cil be authorized to approve bills for expenses in- 
curred by the Common Council, and the standing 
committees of the Common Council not having 
charge of any appropriations of money; also by in- 
dividual members of this Council, while engaged in 
the discharge of official duty; the amount of said 
bills to be charged to the appropriation for Contin- 
gent Expenses of the Common Council. 

Passed under a suspension of the rules on motion 
of Mr. Dean of Ward 12. 

DISPOSITION or UNEXPENDED APPROPRIATIONS. 

On motion of Mr. West of Ward 16— 

Ordered, That the balances of appropriations of 
1873 made by the city of Cbarlestown and towns 
of West Roxbury and Brighton for the purpose of 
defraying the expenses of the several departments of 
said city and towns, and for the erection of certain 
buildings, and" for other purposes, as certified by the 
treasurers of said city and towns, be received and 
added, as far as may be, by the Auditor of Accounts 
to corresponding appropriations made by the City 
Council of Boston, for 1873-74, for like purposes, for 
the purpose of meeting the additional expenses which 
will be incurred by the several departments in conse- 
quence of the aniiexaion of said city and towns to 
this city. Those appropriations which are for objects 
not contemplated in the regular appropriations, to 
remain as special appropriationsuutil the objects for 
which they were made are completed. 

Passea under a suspension of the rules, on motion 
of Mr. Dean of Ward 12. 

RULES OF THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Mr. Brackett of Ward 10, from the committee ap- 
pointed to prepare rules and orders for the govern- 
ment of the Common Council during the present year, 
reported the following order: 

Ordered, That the rules and orders for the govern- 
ment of the Common Council of last year be adopted 
as the rules and orders of the present Common Coun- 
cil, with the following amendments, namely: 

Strike out section eleven, and insert in place thereof 
the following: "Section 11. The President shall con- 
sider a motion to adjourn as always in order, except 
upon an immediate repetition, and that motion shall 
be decided without debate. On the previous ques- 
tion, and on the metion to lay on the table or take 
from the table, not exceeding ten minutes shall be 
allowed for debate, and no member shall speak more 
than three minutes." 

Add to section seventeen the following words: 
"No member shall speak more than twice on one 
question without first obtaining leave of the Coun- 
cil; nor more than once until the other members, 
who have not spoken, shall speak if they desire it." 

Add to section thirty-nine the following words: 
"The members on the part of the Joint Standing 
Committee on Ordinances shall be a s.anding com- 
mittee, to be styled the Committee on the Judiciary, 
to whom all disputed questions of law may be re- 
ferred; ana who shall, when requested, obtain the 



12 



COMMON COUISrCIL 



opinion of the City Solicitor thereon, and report the 
game to the Council." 

The report was accepted and the order read once. 

Mr. Brackett of Ward 10— It has been suggested 
that that portion of the order in regard to establish- 
ing a Committee on the Judiciary is somewhat vague, 
and ought to be amended. I therefore move to 
amend by inserting after the words "when required'' 
the words "by the Common Council." 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5—1 would inquire whether it is 
intended to cut off inquiries which the committees 
now have the right to make of the City Solicitor. 
By the present ordinance, committees, and I think 
even members, have a right to ask the opinion of the 
City Solicitor at any time. If it is intended to cur- 
tail that right I shall oppose the amendment. I 
should like to have it explained. 

Mr. Dean of Ward 12—1 do not understand that it 
curtails the right of any committee. It does not 
affect the duties of any committee in any matter be- 
fore them, nor does it limit the right of any individ- 
ual member. It is confir.ed to matters in dispute in 
the Common Council, so that there will be a method 
by which the Council can get at the opinion of the 
City Solicitor, and have a question of law settled 
after it has become a matter of dispute. It will be 
remembered that the subject was refeired to by the 
President in his opening address to the Council, and 
I know that the City Solicitor himself is pleased 
with the idea of having this order passed, so that 
when he does give an opinion it may be an authori- 
tative one, and be so recognized by the Council. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5—1 think that eminently prop- 
er, and my only questio" was in regard to the 
abridgement of the rights of members or com- 
mittees. 

Mr. Minot of Ward 17— It seems to me that the 
present ordinance makes it incumbent upon the City 
Solicitor to give his opinion when asked for. Unless 



it is intended to be done only through the Commit" 
tee on the .Judiciary, it uppear.s to be already provid- 
ed for. [Mr. Minot read the rule of 1873.] 

Mr. Dean of Ward 12— It provides that he shall 
give his opinion to the Common Council. Of course 
ihe City Council will go to him through the com- 
mittee. 

The amendment was aaopted and the order 
passed. 

SPECIAL MEETING. 

On motion of Mr. Wilbur of Ward 9— It was order- 
ed that when the Council adjourn it be to Saturday 
next, at 4 o'clock. 

On motion of Mr. Willcutt of Ward 17— 

Ordered, That the citizens residing in the west 
part of Ward 17 (West Roxbury), be allowed the use 
of Westerly Hall, on such terms and conditions as 
the Committee on Public Buildings may prescribe. 

Passtd. 

On motion of Mr. Hunnewell of Ward 19, the order 
relating to the proposed extension of the flre-alarm 
telegraph into Ward 19, was taken from the table. 

Mr. Hunnewell moved to amend by substituting 
the words "Fire Commissioners" for "Committee on 
Fire Alarms." 

The President ;>70 ^t-m. —The Chair thinks it can 
hardly be within the province of the Council to in- 
struct the Fire Commissioners, though the subject 
might be referred to them. 

On motion of Mr. Hunnewoll, the order was referred 
to the Fire Commissioners. 

On motion of Mr. Hunnewell of Ward 19, the order 
providing for the erection of suitable police stations 
in Ward 19 was taken from the table and referred to 
the Committee on Public Buildings, when appointed. 

On motion of Mr. Burditt of Ward 16, the Council 
adjourned to Saturday next, 17th inst.,at four o'clock 
P. M. 



13 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 



JANUAKY 1 



1874. 



An adjourned meeting of tlie Common Council 
was held at four o'clock P. M. today, E. O. Shepard, 
President, in the cliair. In calling the Council to 
order the President said-- 

I bea pardon of the Council for making it necessa- 
ry, on account of my al)tience, to postpone the an- 
nouncement of the committees, last Thursday even- 
iny, and to hold a special meeting. I was nnavoid- 
ably and unexpectedly detained out of the city on 
important business, and it was impossible for me to 
be here. I desire to say, before announcing the 
committees, that it has been somewhat of an uuusu' 
ally difficult proceeding to make up the committees 
satisfactorily, and to divide the work among the 
members of the Council fairly and equally. 1 have not 
succeeded in doing that, but I have come as near 
to it as I was able. Some men of ability have not 
received all that I would have desired to assign to 
them. The good committees are fewer this year 
than heretofore; the number of memliers, a-* yon 
know, is considerably larger, and the Council is an 
able one. 

.TOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Armories— Davis of Ward 14, Whiston of Ward 8, 
Pray of Ward 21, Leach of Ward 10, Cushmun of 
Ward 1. 

Assessors — Weston of Ward 1, Cudworth of Ward 
11, Harriiititon of Ward 8, Burgess of Ward 3, Hicks 
of \\'ard 22. 

Bathing — Whiston of Ward 8, Martin of Ward 7, 
Abbott of Ward 3,Walbridge of Ward 12, Sweat of 
Ward 14. 

Claims— Thacher of Ward 15, Brackett of Ward 
10, Train of Ward 13. Harrington of Ward 8, Kimball 
of Ward 6. 

Commons and Squares— Wilbur of Ward 9, Shaw 
of Ward 5, Barnes of Ward 11, Russell of Ward 5, 
Flatley of Ward 4. 

East Boston Ferries— Cudworth of Ward 11, Day 
of Ward 1, Sweetser of Ward 10, Bent of Ward 2, 
Brown of Ward 8. 

Engineers' IJepartment— Wilbur of Ward 13, Barry 
of Ward 7, Dacey of Ward 22. 

Fire Department— Adams of Ward 14, Smith of 
Ward 10, Crowley of Ward 7. 

Fuel— Abbott of Ward 3, Brown of Ward 8,Mooney 
of Ward 2. 

Harbor— Shaw of Ward .5, Pease of Ward 1, Dean of 
Ward 12. 

Health— Denny of Ward 9, Flynn of Ward 7, Per- 
kius of Ward 16. 

City Hospital— Bearce of Ward 11, Russell of Ward 
6, Fullei of Ward 15. 

Public Institutions— Loring of Ward 12. Thacher 
of Ward 1.5, Barnes of Ward 11, Woods of Ward 8, 
Beale of Ward Iti. 

Mount Hope Cemetery — Perkins of Ward 16, Put- 
nam of Ward 1.5, Jennings of Ward 5. 

Legislative Matters — Putnam of Ward 15, Brackett 
of Ward 10, Collins of Ward 2. 

Ordinances — Dean of Ward 12, West of Ward 16, 
Powers of Ward 4, Boardman of Ward 14, Fuller of 
Ward 15. 

Overseers of the Poor — Day of Ward 1, Sweetser of 
Ward 10, McCarthy of Ward .5. 

Public Buildings— Burditt of Ward 16, Weston of 
Ward 1, Morse of Ward 13, Kent of Ward 21, Hine of 
Ward 6. 

Public Instruction— The President, ex-officio, West 
of Ward 16, Powers of Ward 4, Page of Ward 9, Long 
of Ward 22. 

Public Lands— Woodward of Ward 13, Crowley of 
Ward 7, Crocker of Ward 6, Moley of Ward 19, Sib- 
ley of Ward 20. 

Printing— Wilbur of Ward 9, Sprague of Ward 4, 
Crocker of Ward 6. 

Public Library— Boardman of Ward 14, Woods of 
Ward 8, Sprague of VJ'ard 4, Minot of Ward 17, Gor- 
don of Ward 3. 

Salaries— Leach of Ward 10, Loring of Ward 12, 
Dacey of Ward 20. 

Streets— Flynn of Ward 7, Burditt of Ward 16, 
Page of Ward 9, Woodward of Ward 13, Wilcutt of 
Ward 17. 

Surveyors' Department — Bleiler of Ward 15, Morse 
of Ward 13, Walbridge of Ward 12. 

Survey and Inspection of Buildings— Warren of 
Ward 12, Cawley of Ward 2, Goldthwaiteof Ward 11, 
Smith of Ward 10, Wilbur of Ward 1.^,. 



Treasury Department — Peabody of Ward 9, Sweat 
of Ward 14 Butler of Ward 3. 

WaK^r — Pease of Ward 1, Adams of Ward 14, War- 
ren of Ward 12, Kent of Ward 21, Hiinnuwell of 
Ward 19. 

.JOINT SPECIAL COMMITTEES. 

Northampton-Street District — Noyes of Ward 5, 
Bearce of Ward 11, Train of Ward 13, Davis of Ward 
14, Cawley of Ward 2. 

Army and Kavy Monument on Boston Common — 
Pray of Ward 21, Goldthwaile of Ward 11, Minot of 
Ward ir. 

STANDING COMMITTEES OP THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Police — Martin of Ward 7, Cnshraan of Ward 1, 
Moley of Ward 19, Gordon of Ward 3, Hicks of 
Ward 22. 

Paving— Warren of Ward 12, Sibley of Ward 20, 
Wilcutt of Ward 1", Sweat of Ward 14, Mooney of 
Ward 2. 

In accordance with orders passed at the preceding 
meeting the President announced the following nom- 
inating committees: 

Overseers of the Poor— Messrs. Shaw of Ward .5, 
Goldthwaite of Ward 11, Perkins of Ward 6. 

Water Register— Wilbur of Ward 13, Kimball of 
Ward 6, Kent of Ward 21. 

Ciiy Eiigiueer— Thacher of Ward 15, Peabody of 
Ward 9, Long of Ward 22. 

City Surveyor— Burditt of Ward 16, Davis of Ward 
14, Gordon of Ward 3. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order to authorize the Mayor to draw upon the 
City Treasury to pay all executions and judgments 
of tDe courts, when properly certified by the Cily So- 
licitor. Passed. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

By the President— Petition of Lawrence Perry of 
Ward 17, for compensation for damages caused by 
the ereclion of a police station in West Roxbury. 
next her premises. Referred, on motion of Mr. 
Thacher of Ward 15, to the Committee on Claims. 

By Mr. Adams of Ward 14— Petition of H. B. Hub- 
bard for abatement of sewer tax. Sent up. 

DIRECTORS OF PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 moved that the Couacil pro- 
ceed to the election of Directors of Public Institu- 
tions. 

Mr. Noyes of Ward 5 inquired if it were not neces- 
sary to suspend the rules, requiring nominations to 
lie over one week before they were acted upon by the 
Council. 
The President replied that it was. 
On motion of Mr. Noyes of Ward 5, tlie rules were 
suspended and the election was proceeded with. 

The President appointed Messrs. Flynn of Ward 7, 
Walbridge of Ward 12 and Noyes of Ward 5 a com- 
mittee to receive, sort and count votes. They re- 
ported as follows: 

Whole number of votes 63 

Necessary to a choice :32 

James I'o wer 59 

Cyrus A. Page 34 

J eujaniin Dean 50 

Frederick Pease 37 

William Say ward 56 

William M. Flanders 1 

George P. Baldwin 1 

C;harles Hulbert 1 

Charles H. Hulbert 3 

And Messrs. Power, Dean, Pease and Sayward were 
declared elected, on the part of the Council. 

THE PARK QUESTION. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5 moved to reconsider the vote 
whertby the Council accepted the report of the 
commit'ee on the topics in the mayor's message, and 
adopted the recommendations of the minority in re- 
gard to the subject of a public park. 

Mr. Shaw— As there is hardly time to discuss the 
matter now, I move to lay my motion to reconsider 
upon the table. 

The motion was lost, and the question was upon 
the motion to reconsider. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5—1 did not desire to debate' the 
motion to reconsider now. There seems to have 
been some misapprehension in regard to the matter 
When the report was brought to the Council at the 
last meeting the matter was not stated in detail, as it 
might have been, and hasty action was taken upon 
it. The minority report was substituted for the ma- 
jority in part, if I understand it rightly. I do not 
think the matter was fully understood by the Coun- 
cil, and therefore I made this motion that members 
could have an opportunity to consider it fully, and to 
save the point, and not consume time, I move to lay 
it upon the table. It is, in my judgment, a matter 



JANUARY 17 



1874 



14. 



of some importance; it ought to be thoroughly con- 
sidered and not, prematurely passed upon. This is 
my sole object in making the motion. I am not 
strenuous aDout it, only as a matter of public inter- 
est. If gentlemen of the committee will state how 
it came to be reported in that shape, perhaps I 
should agree with them. Several members of the 
Council have paid to me that they were not satisfied 
with the result. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7— It appears to me to be a 
very simple matter, oue whicti the Council and the 
gentleman hirarielf thoroughly understood at ttie last 
meeting. It was merely a difference of opinion as to 
the proper disposition to be made of that part of the 
Mayor's address relating to a public park. One por- 
tion of the committee suggested that it be referred to 
the Joint Committee on Common; another portion 
wishes it referred to a special commission. I can see 
the gentleman's object in making the motion now 
that he has been placed upon the Committee on Com- 
mon. 

Mr. Bu.'ditt of Ward Itj— I think the gentleman 
from Ward 5 misunderstands the case. I don't 
think any question has been more thoroughly under- 
stood than this. Most of the businsss before the 
committee, being mere routine matters, was passed 
upon unanimously, and this was the only point upon 
whicli there was a difference. The minority put in a 
report to cover that portion of the report in relation 
to a public park. I can't see how there is any mis- 
unders-tanding of the question. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward .5—1 desire to say, with regard 
to the statement of the gentleman from Ward 7, that 
he fulls short of ttie mark. He does not hit me. and 
if he does he hits the President also, for I had no 
notice of my appointment on the Committee on Com- 
)non until my name was called. I gave the usual 
notics of the motion to the Clerk yesterday. That is 
a plain statement of the facts of the case. My mo- 
tive is the fairest in the world Now my friend, who 
signed the report, told me what he had done, and I 
appr,)ved of it. Nevertheless, there is dissatisfaction 
in regard to the action of the Council, and I made 
this motion — as was my duty, and, for that matter, 
the duty of every other member— in order to save the 
point, and I moved to lay the motion upon the table. 
But if permission is given, I will withdraw the mo- 
tion. 

There being no objection, the motion was with- 
drawn. 

TAKEN TROM THE TABLE. 

On motion of Mr. Davis of Ward 14,'the petitions 
of I'.attery D, First Battalion. Infantry, and 
Co. A, Light Artillery, were severally taken from the 
lable and referred to the Committee on Armories. 

MEMBERS OP COCHITUATE WATER BOARD. 

On motion of Mr. Noyes of Ward 5, the rules were 
suspended and the Council proceeded to an election 
for members of the Cochituate Water Board. 
Messrs. Noves of Ward 5, Whiston of Ward 8 and 
Wilbur of Ward 13 were appointed a committee to re- 
ceive, sort and count votes, and they reported as 
follows: 

Whole number of votes 54 

Necessary to a choice 28 

Leonard R. Cutter 52 

Edwara P. Wilbur 53 

William G. Thacher 52 

and these gentlemen were declared elected. 

TRUSTEES or THE CITY HOSPITAL. 

On motion of Mr. Collins of- Ward 2, the rules were 
suspended and the Council proceeded to an election 
for Trustees of the City Hospital. Messrs. Collins of 
Ward 2, Woodward of Ward L3 and Crowley of Ward 
7 were appoii-ted a committee to receive, sort and 
count votes, and they reported as follows: 

Whole number of votes 54 

Necessary to a choice 28 



Charles J. Preseott had 53 

Hillmiui B. Barnes 53 

William H.Kent 54 

and they were declared elected. 

DIRECTORS OF EAST BOSTON FERRIES. 

On motion of Mr. Pease of Ward 1, the rules were 
suspended and the Council proceeded to an election 
for Directors of East Boston Ferries. Messrs. Pease 
of Ward 1, Davis of Ward 14 and Page of Ward 9 
were appointed a committee to receive, sort and 
count votes, and they reported as follows; 

Whole number of votes 54 

Necessary to a choice 28 

Solomon B. Stebbius 54 

Jostiua Weston 54 

Ebenezer Adams 53 

H. W. Harrington 1 

and Messrs. Stebbins, Weston and Adams were de- 
clared elected. 

TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

On motion of Mr. Thacher of Ward 1.5, the rules 
were suspended and the Council proceeded to an 
election for Trustees of the Public Library. Messrs. 
Thacher of Ward 15, Perkins of Ward IB and Gor- 
don of Ward .3, were appointed a committee to re- 
ceive, sort and count votes, and they reported ai fol- 
lows: 

Whole number of votes 54 

Necessary for a choice 28 

.lohnT. Clark had 54 

C.A. Ilurditt 54 

David P. Kimball 53 

William G. Thacher 1 

and Messrs. Clark, Burditt and Kimball were declared 
elected. 

TRUSTEES OF MOUNT HOPE CEMETERY. 

On motion of Mr. West of Ward 16, the rules were 
su?pended and the Council proceeded to an election 
for Trustees of Mount Hope Cemetery. Messrs. 
Vest of Ward 16, Hunnewell of Ward 19 and Butler 
of Ward 3 were appointed a committee to receive, 
sort and count votes, and they reported as follows: 

Whole number of votes 51 

Necessary to a choice '26 

Alanson BIgelo w 51 

David ^histon 51 

William Minot , .Jr 51 

/ nd they were declared elected. 

BADGES. 

On motion of Mr. Davis of Ward 14 — 

Ordered, That a special committee of three be ap- 
pointed to procure suitable badges for the member* 
of the Common Council; the expense to be charged 
to the appropriation for Contingent Expenses of the 
Common Council. 

Read once. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEES. 

Orders for the appointment of joint special com- 
mittees to nominate city officers were severally intro- 
duced and passed, and the committees were ap- 
pointed, as follows— said committees being authorized 
to report to either branch: 

By Mr. Thacher of Ward 15— Commissioner of the 
Sinking Fund: Messrs. Thacher of Ward 15, Pea- 
body of Ward 9 and Loriug of Ward 12. 

By Mr. Perkins of Ward 16— Commissioners of 
Cedar-Grove Cemetery: Messrs. Perkins of Ward 
16, Wilcutt of Ward IT and Fuller of Ward 1.5. 

By Mr. Thacher of Ward 15— Superintendent of 
Public Lands:— Messrs. Thacher of Ward 15, Swect- 
ser of Ward 10, Bent of Ward 2. 

By. Mr. Kimball of Ward 6— City Solicitor: 
Messrs. Kimball of Ward 6, Dean of Ward 12, Put- 
nam of Ward 15. 

On motion of Mr. West of Ward 16, the Council ad- 
journed. 



BOAE.D OF ALDERMEN 



15 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceeding's of the Board of Aldermen, 

JANUARY 19, 1874. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Alder- 
men was held at four o'clock P. M., today, Aldermao 
Clark, chairman, presiding. 

EXECUTIVE NOMINATIONS. 

Weigher of Coal— Orvllle R. Cooper. 

Undertakers— Lorenzo Smith, Benjamin Guild. 

Special Police Officers Without Pay— Thomas E. 
Smith, old City Hall, Cliarlestown; Timothy John- 
son, Town Hall, West Roxbury: Thomas Harahan, 
.340 Harrison avenue and ils vicinity; John Stevens, 
Monument Hall and Its vicinity; John McDaniel, 
Church of St. Francis de Sales, Bunker Hill street. 

Severally contirmed. 

Police Officers with all the Powers of Constables 
except Serving and Executing Civil Process— Oliver 
Ayers, Captam; Benjamin Williams, William H. 
Brown, Lieutenants; Orison Little, Henry Fox, 
Joseph B. Cotton, Sergeants. 

Referred, on motion of Alderman Cutter, to the 
Committee on Police. 

DANGEROUS RAILROAD CROSSINGS. 

The foUowiusj was received: 

Executive Department, / 

Boston, Jan. 19, 1874. )' 

To the Board of Aldermen of the City of Bontoii: 
Gentlemen — 1 transmit herewith a list of dangerous 
railroad crossini^s in this city, which has been pre- 
pared i)y tile Superintendent of Streets at my request. 
If is provided liy chapter 2()2 of the acts of ihe year 
18~'2, that if the Aldermen are of the opinion that it 
is necessary for the security or convenience of the 
j)ublic that the approaches to or methods of crossing 
the railroad tracks should in any way be altered, tjie 
Railroad Commissioners shall, after due notice and 
hearing, prescribe the manner and limits within 
which the alteration should be made, and thereupon 
a commission be appointed to determine whether the 
expense of ma.ting the alteration shall be borne by 
the city or the railroad corooration, or both. I have 
no doubt the directors of the railroads will cooperate 
with the city authorities in doing whatever is neces- 
sary for the public safety and convenience. It is de- 
sirable that prompt action should be taken in this 
matter, as delay will in most cases add greatly to the 
expense for grade damages. 

Samuel C. Cobb, Mayor. 

The dangerous steam railroad crossings designated 
by the Superintendent of Streets, and which it is 
practicable to bridge, are as follows: 
Beacon street, Ward 6, crossed by B & A. R. R. 

Brookline avenue, " B, " " 

Cambridge .street, " 19, " " 

New Heath street, " 15. " B. & P. R. R. 

Boylston street. " 17, " " 

Sliawmut avenue, " 17, " " 

Forest street. " 17, " " 

Blue Hill aveuue, " 16, " N. Y.& N.E.R.R. 

Commercial street, •' 16, " O. C. & N. R. W. 

Park street, " 16, " " 

Walnut street, " 16 " " 

The communication vras referred, on motion of Al- 
derman Cutter, to the Committee on Paving. 

petitions referred. 

To the Committee on Public Bvildings. Bunker Hill 
Monument Association, for use of a room in old Cit}- 
Hall. Charlestown, lor meetings, and for depositing 
and preserving relics and memorials of the Battle of 
Bunker Hill and of the American Revolution. 

Oliver L. Shaw, Inspector of Buildings, for addi- 
tional office room. 

To the Cmnmittee on Public Lands. Gilman & Che- 
ney, for the purchase of Elm-street wharf, Charles- 
town. 

To the Committee on Sewers. Helen B. Hubbard et 
al., for abatement of assessment for sewer in Dudley 
street. 

Warren Lincoln, for abatement of sewer assess- 
ment on Trenton street. 

To the Cmnmittee on Paving. William C. Hoyt et 
(d., for the enforcement of the rule forbidding salt to 
be placed on car tracks, etc. 

John J. French et al., for removal of the bay win- 
dow and porch now projecting some two feet over 
the street line from estate of Daniel Goodnow on 
West Brookline street. 

Mrs. E. Flemins, to be paid for grade damages on 
West Fourth street. 



To the Joint Committee on Streets. G. Washington 
Warren et al., that measureb maybe taken by the 
City Council to expedite the laying out and extension 
of Boylston street to Western or Brookline avenue. 

To the Committee on Ordinances. Directors of East 
Boston F''erries, for the passage of an ordinance, with 
a penalty, to prevent the evasion of tolls and the let- 
ting down of chains before the ferry boat is secured 
to the drop. 

BONDS approved. 

The bonds of Edward Glufling, Perez R. Jacobs, 
James Miskelly, George E. Cutler, Joel P. Cotton, 
William T. Gardner, constables, being duly certified, 
were approved by the Board. 

annual reports of city officers. 

The following annual reports of city officers were 
received in print and sent down : 

Chief of Police. The entire force was 571 men, the 
maximum number being .575, or 55 greater than last 
year. There were appointed during the year, 99; 
died, 11; retired, 37. Ttie ;iverage number of acres 
to the beat is TSJ^; average number of miles, 
2 1-5; average number of inhabitants, 2040; 
total number of acres, 10,771; miles of 
streets, 324; population, 300,000; beats, 147; 
of the patrolmen who are permanently detailed for 
special service, two are in the service of the East 
Boston Ferry Department; two in the service of the 
Registry of Deeds and Probate Department, as 
watchmen; one in the service of the Municipal Court 
of Dorchester; one in the service of the Truant Offi- 
cers; and the Police Constable who is employed in 
serving notices for the Street, Paving and other de- 
partments. In addition to these, for some years past, 
some fourteen officers are withdrawn from their beats 
annually, from the tirst of June till the last of Sep- 
tember, for duty at bathing houses. This arrange- 
ment reduces the force on beats seven men during 
I he entire year, and some twenty-one during four 
months of the busiest season of the year. If it is 
the policy of the Government that each department 
be chargeable with its own legitimate expenses, the 
question arises, "Ought all of these services to be 
paid for from the Police appropriation?" 

Taking into cousideraticn the long distance each 
officer is now required to patrol, and the rapid in- 
crease of population and business, a further addition 
to the force would seem to be necessary at no distant 
day. 

The expenditures of Ihe department during nine 
months of the tinancial year to December 31, 1873, 
have been as follows: Payroll of olKcers, $472, 13J 40; 
care of stations, $:580:i 48; fuel, $22ti2J01; gas, 
$4440 01; water, $849 20; furniture and carpets, 
$2963 52; medical attendance on sick and injured 
persons, $1045 97; printing and stationery, $3034 53; 
repairs and expenses of police telegraph, $432 .50; 
carriage of prisoners, .$1957 50; sundry expenses, 
$9042 98; total for nine months, $.501,9(52 10; balance 
in treasury, $198,037 90; total appropriation, $700,- 
000 00. 

The balance remaining in the treasury of $198,- 
0:^7 90 would undoubtedly have been sufficient for the 
ordinary expenses of the department during the re- 
maining three months of the financial year, but the 
increased expense rendered necessary by annexation 
was unprovided for in the estimate, and consequent- 
ly a further appropriation will be required. 

Work of the police during the year — Arrests, 27.845; 
males, 22.168; females, .5677; Americans, 9463; foreign- 
ers, 18,382; non-residents, 6149; minors, 5225; commit- 
ments, 19,:360; lodgers, 47,661; males, 42,003; females. 
.56.58; Americans, 19,004; foreigners, 28,6.57: non-resi- 
dents, ;i8.966; minors, 6325; amount of property taken 
from prisoners and lodgers and restored to them, 
$64,;375 72; amount of property reported stolen in the 
city, ;$78, 225 00; amount of property recovered which 
was stolen in and out of the city, $69,229 07; amount 
of fines imposed by the courts, $70,042 00; amount of 
imprisonment by same, 1733 years 2 months; number 
of days spent in court by officeis, 15,206; amount of 
witness fees earned, $17,483 02; number of larcenies 
reported at stations, 2897; number of arrests for same, 
19.53; amount received for dog licenses, $f<:j2:^ 75. 

Nature of crime— Drunkenness, 11,519; disorderly, 
.5291; assault and battery, 1990; suspicious persons. 
1.576; larceny, K583; felonious larceny, .529; violation 
of city ordinances, 490; witnesses, 431; common 
drunkards, :398; suspicion of larceny, 347; violation of 
Sunday law. 318; disturbance of peace, ;303; malicious 
mischief. 267; idle and disorderly, 2:^6; felonious as- 
sault, 225; vagrancy, 216; insane, 205; shojjbrcakins:, 
181; truancy, 1.55; gaming on Lord's Day, 129; night 
walking, 128; keeping house of ill fame, 84; stubborn 
children, 81; default warrant, 70; fust driving, 68; be- 
ing present at game, 67; fornication, 62; keeping liq- 
uor nuisance, .59; robbery. .59; breaking and enter- 



10 



BOAnr^ OF ALDERMEN 



ins;, 54; deserters, 43; fraud, 41; runaways, 4fi; threat- 
eniD^; bodily harm, 42; embezzlement, 1-2; adultery, 
;iH: kiiepinsi lottery, 3j: reeeiving i^tolen <;ooils. 33; an- 
siiiilt on an olllccr, 35; ba^■tardy, :;2(); forjjery,'^."); house- 
breaking;, 27; pickiiii; poekets. 24; escaped convicts, 
17; delirium tremens, li); cruelty to animals, 10: bur- 
glary, 11; rape, (i; niur(ler, 12; manslaughter, 5; in- 
cendiaries, incest, polygamy, perjury, 2 each; aban- 
donment, abortion, 1 each. 

Nativity of prisoners-United Stales, <)4(i."); British 
nrovinces, i)73; Canada, 98; Ireland, 14,7'.»1: Kngland, 
1003; France, 100; (;ermany, 420; Italy, 77; Portu- 
Sal, 51; Sweden, 118; (Scotland, 407; Spain, 12; Nor- 
way, 44; Africa, 174; Denmark, 20; Wales, 13; Bel- 
gium, 21; Holland, 4; Hussia, 30; total, 27,84.5. 

'I'he report calls attention to the need of increased 
|)olice force in East lioston and also an increase of 
the accommodations for the harbor police. U says 
that the mounted police upon the Milldam has been 
successful, and then goes on to discuss other topics. 
It says of the insane that while the population of the 
city lias increased only about thirty-two and one- 
half per cent, during the past ten \ears, the number 
of cases of insanity cared for bytluniolic.e has in- 
creased during the same time one hundred am. 
thirty-tive i)er cent., and this without reckoning 
cases of delirium tremens. Provision for iheir tem- 
porary detention is recommended. 

It api)ears, from the record, that the average num- 
ber of arrests for night-walking during the past lour 
years is iess-than the average of the si.x years imme- 
diately previous. There have been, however, many 
of this class of persons taken in charge by the police, 
who have not been numbered among the arrests, but 
who have been sent to their friends out of the city; 
while about one-third of those complained of at cou'rt. 
and convicted h:ive been put on probation, and an 
effort made to pi ice them under such restiaintas 
will prevent their falling again under those mtluences 
that must inevitably drag ihein doun to infamy. 

A table of crime in Boston for the past ten years is 
inserted, which takes the l)asis of jiopulation in 1804 
to have been 185,000, and the increase for six 
years 32;<j per cent.; and the arrests for the 
same time being 28,113. Upon Ihe principle that, 
the Increase of vice and crime in a city is likely 
to more than keep pace with the increase of 
population, adding the tWi per cent, for the increase 
of crime, and we have 37,249, being the average num- 
ber of arrests we might reasonably expect for the 
last four years; but on turnmg to the tab'e of arrests 
actually made during the laiter period, we find the 
average to be only 28,122, and this notwithstanding 
the tendency to crime consequent upon >50 great an 
increase of population, and without lakmg into ac- 
count the fact that the arrests for the first six years 
do not include those made in Rosbury or Dorchester 
before their annexation, which, if included, would 
show the average for the last four years m a still 
more favorable light. The iacrease of females and 
minors among the arrests nearly keeps pace with 
the increase of population, while the increase of 
non-resideut criminals is 43 per cent., or a pain of 
about 10J4 per cent, on the increase of population, 
the records showing that 20 per cent, or one-fifth of 
all the crime committed in Boston during the last 
four years has been done by non-residents. 

The number of places where intoxicating liquors 
are now sold in the city is reported by the police 
captains to be 2427, some .300 leas than last year, and 
about TiW less than in the year 1871. The average 
number of persons arrested for drunkenness during 
the last four years is about 10 per cent, more tlian 
the average of the six former years, not having kept 
pa(.e with the increase of iJopulation by about 22 per 
cent.; and the arrests from tne same cause durin'^- 
1872 and'1873 are about lu per cent, less than in 1870 
and 1871, showing an actual decrease in drunken- 
ness during the past two years, notwithstanding the 
steady increase in population during that period. 

The protection of life and property during the last 
four years will compare favoral)ly with any former 
period. The average amount of property leported 
stolen yearly in the city, for the six years erding in 
1809. is $334,512; add to this 32'., percent, for the 
increase of population, and we have the sum of 
$443,228; but turning to the yearly average for the 
four years ending in 1873, and we find the same 
amounts to only $74,2.30, being only Hbout oiu-flfUi 
of the average for the si.K former years, and /c.sv ifiiur 
otte-tii.rf/i o( what it must have been had the amount 
kept pace with the increase of population. There 
are some honest people who seem to think that Bos- 
ton is advancing with rapid strides in the paths of 
intemperance and wickedness, but these figures do 
not seem to warrant that conclusion. 

Appended is the report of the Boston Police Relief 
Association, whicli now numbers 392 members, 7 
having died, 23 retired fiora the department, and 3 



withdrawn from the association. The receipts for 
the year were $13,3.55 08, and the payments $70(J8 95, 
leaving the total funds of the association $18,970 78, 
an increase of $0340 13. The fund for the relief of 
disabled policemen is now $31,803 25. 

The Superintendent of Hacks reports 003 licenses 
in force, with 00 to be added by the annexation of 
territory. The Superintendent of Trucks reports 
3170 licenses in force January 1, 1873; new licenses 
granted, 187; transferred, 421; revoked, 1. The Su- 
perintendent of Pawnbrokers reports 72 pawn- 
brokers and 195 secoiLd-hand dealers licensed. 
Amount of stolen property recovered, $1783. The 
Superintendent of Intelligence Oflices reports .54 
intelligence offices, 81 auctioneers, 44 billiard room« 
and b-jwliiig alleys, 108 fruit stands, 44 chestnut 
stands. The Superintendent of Building Permits re- 
ports 1940 ))ermits; complaints at court for violation 
of permits. 17. 

8vpmtiteri(l(-nt oj ruhlic Lan(U. Sales of public 
lands during the year, 48,.505 square feet for $05.- 
118 75; for which there have been received in cash 
$50,484 7.5, and in bonds $14,034. Receipts for 
extension [of time of building, rents, etc., 
$3,580. The expenditures of the department, in- 
cluding $1800 for salary of superintendent, have 
been $4005 70. There are now 3.000,101 square feet 
of salable lauds belonging to the city in charge of the 
department. 

Sirperintendenf of Public Buildings. Expenditures 
on public buildings except schoolhouses and county 
buildings, $117,110 72; on county buildings, $54,"- 
2.50 t;5; on schoolhouses, $2.50,7ti3 .59. Total amount 
appropriated for new buildings during the year, to- 
gether with amounts for special appropriations car- 
ru^d over from the previous year, $808,500. The re- 
port contains a list of t le work on public buildings in 
progress, and the following comparative statement of 
tne number of county buildings, public buildings, and 
schoolhouses, together with the number of feet ol 
land covered by i he same, between the years 1804 
and 1874. 



— C y^ j^i CO -; 






M 



^oiii" -S ^- i;" ~ Increase 

t^ ^ «H — — — t^ tie v,™,....::; in len 

= •- csj-g o= = 03 Years. 

d 6S.'ZR 6 oStM 

'A 'A ^ J5 

tact. 1864. 1874. 1874. 

County Buildings, i 16a,2i)7 3 15?,498 '%llt. 

Public Buildings. :?2 2K!I,:3S7 80 1.307,489 1,0.38,152 ft. 

Sclioolhouses 74 (i77,0OJ 107 1,517,910 84U.910ft. 



Totals 109 1.099,634 190 2,978.897 l,S79,263ft. 

The above will show atotal|increase in ten years of 
81 buildings, and of land equivalent to about43 acres. 
The estimated valuation of the several county, public 
buildings and schoolhouses, including furniture, 
land, etc., is as follows: County, $2,000,000, public 
buildings, $5,250,000, schoolhouses, $0,.500.000; total, 
.$13,750,000. The amount of fencing surrounding the 
various schoolhouses is equal to about ten miles, 
lineal measurement. 

Cily iiiirveyor. Total expenditures for the year. 
$38,2.57 05, divided as follows: Expenses of City Sur- 
veyor's office at City Hall, $24, .575 30; expenses of 
the Roxbury branch office, $4818 19; expenses of the 
Dorchester "branch office, $8202 90; total expenditure 
from appropriation for surveying, $37,650 45; amount 
charged to the appiopriation for "Northampton street 
District," $000 00. The average number of persons 
employed during the past year in the City Surveyor's 
office at City Hall was 22: persons employed in the 
Roxbury branch office: O:*persons employed in the 
Dorchester branch office, 13: total, 41. The report 
contains a list of surveys, plans and profiles that 
have been made in this department during the year, 
and reviews the work done in the burnt, Halleck- 
street and other districts. 

A survey has been made during the year of that 
portion of the West End bordering upon Leverett. 
Green and Court streets, between Cragie's Bridge and 
Scollay square. This survey was made with a view 
to the wi dening of Leverettstreet, and extending the 
same to Bowdoin square, and also the widening of 
Court street between Bowdoin square and Sudbury 
street, — thus making a wider and more direct avenue 
to the West End and to East Cambridge. It is plot- 
ted on a scale of twenty feet to an inch, is sixteen 
feet long by four feet wide, and shows the estates, 
buildings and owners' names, as this improvemenr 
is. as yet, only a projected one, the Street Commis- 
sioners have not given the subject sufficient consid- 
ciation to enable them to decide upon the new lines 
of the streets; and therefore no survey has been made 
of the laud required to be taken from the several es- 
tates. 

The City Surveyor recommends that the duty of 
giving the grade of cellars, etc., be done by an Assist- 



JANUARY 19. 1874 



17 



ant-Surveyor, detailed expressly by the Inspector 
of Buildings. Owing to ttie rapid growth of the citj;, 
occasioned by recent annexations, it will be impossi- 
ble for the City Surveyor to longer act as Secretary 
of the Committee on Streets of the Board of Alder- 
men, without seriously interfering with the legiti- 
mate duties of his office. 

8t7'eet Ccmunissioners. At the close of their re- 
port for 1872, the Board of Street Comissioners had 
out begun upon the finally completed plan of street 
improvements for the portion of the city burned 
over by the tire in November of that year. January 
•2, 1873, the last day of the municipal year 1872. they 
had passed the following orders, which had also by 
that date received the necessary concurrent action 
of your honorable body: 

Wlueniug Washington street. Milk to Summer 
street, BO feet $338,547 00 

Widening High street. Congress to Oliver 
street. 50 feet 51,302 00 

Widening Purchase street, Federal to Pearl 
street. 50 feet 93,913 00 

■Widening Summer street, BO feet 294.133 00 

Widening Lnulall street, 40 feet 80,280 00 

$861,175 00 

Prom the beginning of 1873 they hastened to finish 
the work thusVtarted, quite to tbe exclusion, seeing 
the interests awaiting action in this part of the city, 
of all other than matters of the merest oflicial routine. 
To I'econcile the diversities of these interests, and 
arrange plans of widening the old and locating the 
lines of the new streets for the greatest public good 
with the least private injury, seemed, at first, an un- 
ending work. The conflict of opinion among the 
laud-owners was in its extent something unique, 
even in the wide experience the board had gained in 
its previous dealings with citizens in such matters. 
Enough of it, however, has reached the Council, 
either through its committees or unofficially, to show 
them with what difficulties the board labored. The 
report gives a resume of the street wideniugs and 
extensions in the ''burnt district" during the year, 
with the following tabulated statement thereof in the 
order of their presentation to the City Council: 

Otis widened, 45 feet |55,192 00 

Devonshire widened, Summer to Franklin, 

45 feet 98,051 00 

Lincoln wldenea, near Summer, 50 feet 22,950 50 

Chauncy widened, corner Summer, 50 feet. . . 42,520 00 
Devonshire widened, on a pan of Theatre al- 
ley.... 15,180 00 

Congress widened. Broad to Water, 60 and 70 

feet 514.795 00 

Federal widened, Summer to Milk, 60 feet. . . 341,869 00 

Pearl extended to Wat>»r, 50 feet 170,300 00 

Milk widened, Washington to Batterymarch, 

50 and 60 feet 297,462 00 

Franklin widened and extended to Pearl, 50 

feet 314,892 00 

Oliver extended to KilBy 131,220 00 

Hawley widened, 40 feet 277,730 00 

Arch widened and extended to Milk, 50 and 

40 feet 334,600 00 

Quincy place laid out and extended to Pearl 

place. 30 feet 12,784 00 

Post Office square laid out 112,010 00 

Water widened, Devonshire to Congress, 60 

feet 211.675 00 

Matthews widened, cor. Congress, 30 feet 1,530 00 

Lincoln wloeiied. near Summer, 50 feet 1,300 00 

Congress widened. Water to State, 54 feet 484,626 00 

Broad widened. Atlantic avenue to Summer 

street, 100 feet 780,887 25 

Pearl widened, near Milk, 50 feet 1,414 00 

Pearl, areas put into the highway, 50 feet 66,440 00 

$4,289,427 75 

Adding to this $4,289,427 75, the figures of the 
latter part of 1872, as above written, $861,175, a total 
of .$5,150,602 75 is attained, as the complete estimated 
cost of these improvements. In May came the fire 
upon Washington and Essex streets. Then the de- 
sired sixty-feet width was secured for Washington 
street, from Boylston to Avery street, and Essex 
street was made fifty feet wide, from Washingtoti 
Street to Harrison avenue. The cost was estimated 
at $144,474 for Washington street and $82,1.30 for 
Essex street, or a total of $226,612. 

In other directions, the last half of the year, the 
Commissioners were not entirely inactive. It was 
difficult but not impossible to convince the residents 
of each different part of the city that the general 
economy must be rigidly applied to their particular 
sufferings for street accommodation. Where little 
matters could be accomplished at small and in some 
cases no cost to the city, they were given early at- 
tention, and some few of even more importance and 
expense were acted upon, having their justification, 
the Commissioners think, in both the safety and 
comfort of the people. Of this part of their work 
the report also gives a resume. 



The betterments assessed during the year were as 
follows: 

For the widenin of Dudley and other streets 
in 1871, at an estimated cost of $114,040 54. . 37,738 00 

•For the widening ot Kneeland street in 1871, at 

an estimated cost of $128,017 5" 41,981 00 

For the extension of Columbus avenue to ParK 
square in 1871, at an estimated Cust of $165,- 
849 -78,361 50 

For the extension of Appleton street to Tre- 
mont street in 1872, at an estimated cost of 
$93,176 20,512 00 

$178,592 50 
UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Orders to pay— Heirs of Joseph Bumstead $357 22, 
for Magazine-street damages; Susan C. Wheelwright 
$2,436 ^5. for Pearl-street damages; Mutual Life In- 
surance Company of New Y(ii U, $37,926. for Pearl- 
street damages; James Parker $1599, for Pearl-street 
damages; £. L. Perkins $.502. for Thornton-street 
dama^jes: Charles Pope $183 78, for Magazine-street 
damages; William F. Weld $55,615, for Franklin- 
street damages. Severally passed, 

PAPERS FKOM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Petitions of Company D, First Battalion Light 
Infantry; Battery A, Light Artillery; Matthew 
O'Brien, Alexander Stiles, and Laurean Perry. Re- 
ferred in concurrence. 

Order for Committee on Public Buiidings to con- 
sider the necessity of providing police stations for 
Ward 19. Referred to the Committee on Public 
Buildings. 

Order to allow the citizens of the west part of 
Ward 17 to use Westerly Hall on such terms and 
conditions as the Committee on Public Buildings 
may prescrii e. Referred to the Committee on Pub- 
lic Buildings. 

Annual report of Sealers of Weights and Meas- 
ures. (City Doc. No. 10.) Placed on file. 

Order to request the Committee on Fire Alarms to 
consider the expediency of extending the fire- 
alarm telegraph into Ward 19. Referred to the 
Board of Fire Commissioners. 

Order to add balances of appropriations from 
Brighton, Charlestown and West Roxbury to corre- 
sponding appropriations for similar purposes in this 
city. Passed. 

Order requesting the Street Commissioners to take 
action for laying out Parker street from Beacon 
street to Tremont street, came from the Council 
passed. 

Alderman Worthington— I move that the order be 
referred to the Joint Committee on Streets. A large 
proportion of the land belongs to the State, and it is 
a matter for serious consideration how f;ir the city 
can go in taking the property of the Commonwealth 
and making it into streets, and then call upon the 
citizens of Boston to pay for it. Therefore I hope 
the order will be referred and that the committee will 
report upon it. 

The motion to refer prevailed. 

THE PAKK QUESTION. 

Report of Special Committee on Mayor's Address, 
and order including a reference of so much as re- 
lates to public parks to a special commission, to 
consist of two Aldermen, three Councilmen, three 
citizens at large, and the Mayor; said commission 
on part of the City Council to be elected by concur- 
rent ballot, and those at large to be appointed 
by the Mayor. 

The question was on concurring with the Council 
in substituting the minority report, for so much of 
the majority report, as relates to the subject of a 
public park. 

Alderman Power moved that the report of the ma- 
jority (reference of the subject to Committee on 
Common and Squares) be substituted for the order 
as adopted by the Council. 

Alderman "Worthington — I hope this Board of Al- 
dermen will not substitute the report of the major 
ity for that of the minority, adopted by the Council' 
I believe the order reported by the minority will meet 
the views of the citizens of Boston much better than 
that of the majority. This subject has been consid- 
ered for many days by the citizens of Boston; it has 
been discussed and voted upon, and now we are 
asked to refer it again. I believe that order will go 
with more authority if we have a report from a select 
committee of the Council with three citizens at large 
added. I believe we shall get a report that will com- 
mand the support of the people better than if we 
take a report from the Committee on Common and 
Squares. That committee has as much as it can at- 
tend 'o BOW. I hope we shall concur with the Coun- 
cil and meet the views of the people. 

Alderman Power— I don't Know why this Board 
should depart from the course It nas adopted on 



la 



BOARD OF AI^DKRMEN 



all meisurc's that have been alluded to in the Mayor's 
addresf. Here is the luiittei- of water j^upply, involv- 
ing an expi-nditure of eif^ht million dollars that is 
referred lo the Commiliee on Water. Other matters 
are referred to the refpective conimitteHs which have 
charge of the departnienti* appertaininj; thereto. 
Now, why walk over the Committee on Common 
and Squares? Are they not as eoninetent to attend 
to this matter as other committtes are to cuusider 
the subjects referri'd to them? The Mayor has com- 
mitted Himself iri favor of parks, and has submitted 
his opinions to the City (jovernment for considera- 
tion. Now, hefnre we 'elect a park, the City 
Government should have an oi)portunity to take some 
action upon the sul).ject. By CDncurring with the Com- 
mon Council, we put it out of our bands to take such 
action. I know the Mayor is an honest man: he has 
committed himself in favor of parks, and if he ap- 
points commissioners he will a|)point gentlemen in 
favor of parks, and the City Government will be 
committed to the scheme of a public park before it 
has had an opportunity to take action upon it. The 
Committee on (.^ommcn is ju^t as competent to act 
on the sub.iect of a park as the Committee on Water 
is to act on the subject of a water supply. This is 
the only thing that i?i taken out of the hands of this 
Government and put in charge of commissioners. 
^*, matters not to this Government whether 
the Committee on Common are in favor 
of parks or not; they can consider the 
subject and report to this Board. and 
then it can be acted upon. I don't see that anything 
is to be gained by faking the action recommended 
by the gentleman. I don't know whether the major- 
ity of the Committee on Common are in favor of 
parks or not; I think they are. Foi myself, 1 am op- 
posed to parks at present, though I think we have 
got to have them some time or other. The chairman 
of this committee voted to have the matter go to 
the Committee on Common; I don't think he was 
afraid of it. To substitute this minority order would 
look as if the Committee on Common were not to 
be trusted. I think they can be, and are just as much 
deserving of confidence as any other committee. 
Therefore I hope the report of the majority will be 
adopted by this Board. I pledge myself, as an oppo- 
nent of parks, to give the matter due consideration 
and to make a report as speedily as possible, so that 
every gentleman can have an opportunity to present 
his views and advocate them. 

Alderman Worthington— I don't understand that 
this is in any way censurinj; the Committee on Com- 
mon and Squares. I hope we shall acquiesce in the 
action of the Council, because I believe it will more 
fully meet the views of the people. Therefore I 
hope the order will pass, and there shall be no feeling 
between the Common Council and the Board of Al- 
dermen. I have all confidence in the Committee on 
Common and Squares. The Council asks thiit this 
shall be referred to a sp«cial commission, and I know 
the Council does not intend to censure the Commit- 
tee on Common and Squares. I believe it is due to 
the Council as a matter of courtesy to concur in the 
passage of the first order that has come down from 
them. 

Alderman Power— I think courtesy is also due this 
Board from the other branch. I don't think the 
Council intended any insult or slur upon the Com- 
mittee on Common, but perhaps they thought that 
committee would n't act upon the matter as speedily 
as they might. I feel certain that they will act more 
speedily, and that this Government will get a report 
much sooner than it will by concurring with the 
Council. If the Committee on Water are to be 
trusted to consider the matter of water, I don't see 
why the Committee on Common and Squares shall 
not be trusted to consider this subject of a public 
park. I know they will make a report much quicker 
than this large and unwieldy committee proposed by 
the Council. 

On motion of Alderman Cutter the yeas and nays 
were ordered. The vote was then taken on Alder- 
man Power's motion to substitute the majority re- 
port: 

Yeas— Aldermen Bigelow, Brooks, Clark, Cutter, 
Power, Stebbins- 6. 

Nays— Aldermen Emery, Hall, Harris, Peters, 
Prescott, Worthington— 6. 

There being a tie the motion was lost. 

Alderman '^'^orthington moved to concur with the 
Council. 

Alderman Power called for the yeas and nays and 
they were ordered. 

Yeas— Aldermen Emery, Hall, Harris, Peters, Pres- 
cott, Worthington— 6. 

Nays— Aldermen Bigelow, Brooks, Clark, Cutter, 
Power, Stebbins— 6. 

There being a tie, the motion was lost. 



Alderman Stebbins- 1 move the subject lie upon 
the table. 

The Chairman— The last vote d'sposes of the sub- 
ject so far as this Board is concerned. 

Alderman Stel)biu8—I supposed it could betaken 
from the table at any time. 

The Chairman —The Chair rules that the order is 
killed in this Board. 

Alderman Power— I move a reconsideration of the 
last vole, hoping it will not prevail. 

Alderman Emery— I did n't rise to make any speech 
upon this matter, but I hope we will not dispose of 
this matter without due consideration. We have had 
but little time so far. It went through the Council 
quite recently, came up to us, and we have passed it 
off as though It were a very light thing. I hope we 
shall have, and I think gentlemen ought to take, a 
little m re time to consider it. I therefore move to 
lay the motion for a reconsideration upon the table, 
and I hope it will prevail. 

Alderman Power called for the yeas and nays, and 
they were ordered. 

Alderman WorthingtOB (unanimous consent being 
given)— I think we should take more time. If I un- 
derstand the matter, the defeat of this order will kill 
this subject for the whole year. 

The Chairman— The Chair rules that only this order 
will t)e killed. 

Alderman Worthington — I hope the subject will be 
laid upon the table. 

The motion to lay the motion for a reconsideration 
upon the table, prevailed — yeas 9, nays 3. 

Yeas— Aldermen Brooks, Clark, Emery, Hall, Har- 
ris. Peters. Pretcotf, Stebbins, Worthington— 9. 

Nays— Aldermen Bigelow, Cutter, Power — :3. 

C05IMITTEES .JOINED. 

Various orders for the appointment of joint special 
committees to nominate city officers, came from the 
Council, were passed in concurrence, and the com- 
mittees were joined as follows: 

Water Registrar— Aldermen Bigelow, Worthing- 
ton. 

Superintendent of Public Lands— Aldermen Emery, 
Harris. 

Commissioner of Cedar Grove Cemetery — Alder- 
men Stebbins, Hall. 

Commissioner of the Sinking Fund— Aldermen 
Cutter, Hall. 

City Surveyor — Aldermen Emery, Brooks. 

City Engineer— Aldermen Cutter, Stebbins. 

Overseers of the Poor— Aldermen Bigelow, Harris. 

City Solicitor— Aldermen Peters, Prescott. 

ELECTIONS OF CITY OFFICERS. 

Various reports of joint special committees to 
nominate city officers were received, together with 
certificates of election by the Common Council. The 
reports were severally accepted, and the Board suc- 
cessively proceeded to ballot for uaid officers in each 
case, with the result appended: 

Trustees of City Hospital. Aldermen Stebbins and 
Harris were appointed a committee to receive and 
count votes. 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

Ctiarles .J. Prescott had 11 

Hlllraau B. Barnes 12 

WilllamH. Kent 12 

James Power 1 

and Messrs. Pre8C0*t, Barnes and Kent were de 
c'a'ed elected in concurrence. 

Trustees of Public Library. Aldermen Bieelow 
and Worthington were appointed a committee to re- 
ceive and count votes. 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice ' 

John T. Clark U 

Charles A. Burdltt 12 

David P. Kimball 12 

and they were declared elected ie concurrence. 

Trustees of Mt. Hope Cemetery. Aldermen Peters 
and Power were appointed a committee to receive 
and count votes. 

Whole number of votes 12 . 

Necessary to a choice T 

Alanson Bigelow 11 

David Whtston 12 

William Mluot, Jr 12 

and they were declared elected in concurrence. 

Directors of Putdic Institutions. Aldermen Cutter 
and Emery were appointed a committee to recsive 
and count votes. 

Whole number of votes 18 

Necessary to a choice 1 

James Power had 1 

Charles J. Prescott 1 

Cyrus A. Page S 

Frederick Pease 8 

Benjamin Dean 8 

William Say ward 12 



JANUAE.Y 19 



1874. 



19 



Alderman Power was declared elected on the part 
of the Boara of Aldermen, and Mr. Sayward at large, 
in concurrence, and there was no choice for members 
on the part of the Council. A second ballot was 
taken. 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice " 

Cyrus A. Page had 5 

Frederick Pease § 

Benjamin Dean I 

and Messrs. Pease and Dean were declared elected in 
concurrence. 

Directors East Boston Ferries. Aldermen Emery 
and Prescott were appointed a committee to receive 
and count votes. 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

Solomon 13. Stebbius had 11 

Hiram Emer> 1 

Joshua Weston 12 

Ebenezer Adams 12 

and Messrs. Stebhins, Weston and Adams were de- 
clared elected in concurrence. 

Members of Cochituate Water Board. Aldermen 
Worthington and Hall were appointed a committee 
to receive and count votes: 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

Leonard R Cutter 11 

Edward P. Wilbur 12 

William G. Ttiacher 12 

and they were declared elected, in concurrence. 

REPORTS AND ORDERS. 

On motion of Alderman Cutter- 
Ordered, That until otherwise ordered, the maxi- 
mum number of Lieutenants of Police be thirty- 
seven; the maximum number of Sergeants of Police 
shall be thirty-eight; the maximum number of Pa- 
trolmen shall be five hundred and sixty. 

Alderman Stebbins iuquireo how much the present 
police force was increased by this order. 

Alderman Cutter— The present force is 497. The 
increase is for the additional districts in Brighton, 
West Roxbury and Charlestown. 

The order was passed. 

On motion of Alderman Cutter — 

Ordered, That the Committee on Police be author- 
ized to extend the police telegraph system to West 
Roxbury, Brighton and Charlestown; the expense to 
be charged to the appropriation for Police. 

Passed. 

Alderman Cutter submitted a report from the Com- 
mittee on Police, to whom was referred the message 
of his Honor the Mayor suggesting the propriety of 
restraining the occupants of buildings on the "burnt 
district" from projecting signs and banners into and 
over the public streets, and the remonstrance of Her- 
eey, Washburn & Co et at. against the projection of 
signs on Federal street. The committee recommend 
the passage of the accompanying order: 

Ordered, That the Chief-of-Police be directed to 
notify all parties who have hung, affixed, erected or 
fastened any sign, lantern, show bill or show board 
of any description whatever which projects into or 
over any street more than one foot, within the terri- 
tory covered by the fires of November 9, 1872, and 
May 30. 1873, to remove the said projections; and in 
case of the neglect or refusal of said parties so to do 
within ten days from the date hereof, the Chief-of- 
Police is instructed to cause complaints to be made 
against them, as provided by section 23 of the ordi- 
nances in relation to streets, passed October 39, 1869. 

The order was passed. 

On motion of Alderman Cutter — 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized, under the direction of the Committee on 
Paving, to contract from lime to time for the pur- 
chase and exchange of horses, the supply of hay, 
grains, paving stones, gravel and other materials re- 
quired for the operations of the PavingiDepartment, 
during the present municipal year. 

Passed. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Street be 
authorized to lay flagging cross-walks and pave 
gutters on the public streets of the city when 
deemed expedient by the Committee on Paving. 
Passed. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets, 
under the direction of the Committee on Paving, be 
authorized to furnish and set edgestones, and pave 
sidewalks on any portions of public streets when the 
abutters agree in writing to pay one half the cost 
thereof. 
Passed. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized, under the direction of the Committee on 
Paving, to number or renumber any street, court or 
place, within the city limits, whenever in the opin- 



ion of said committee, the public convenience will 
l9e promoted thereby. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to grant permits to open the streets in ac- 
cordance with the ninth and tenth sections of the 
ordinance relating to streets. 

Passed. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized, under the direction of the Committee on 
Paving, to grant permits for moving buildingie 
through the streets of this city. 

Passed. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized, under the direction of the Committee on 
Paving, to erect fences in front of vacant lots on 
public streets., where the public safety requires the 
same. 

Passed. 

On motion of Alderman Cutter- 
Ordered, That the following regulations be adopt- 
ed for the government of persons who may be 
licensee* to raise or lower goods and merchandise 
outside of buildings in the streets of this city. 
1. Good aud sufficient barriers ^hall be placed across 
the sidewalk, from the wall of the building to the 
curbstone of the sidewalk, on each side of the goods 
or merchandise to be raised or lowered, and kept in 
their places during the whole time the work of rais- 
ing or lowering is in progress, so as to protect trav- 
ellers from injury or danger. 2. The sidewalk shall 
not be encumbered by such goods or merchandise, 
or the raising or loweringthereol, longer than fifteen 
minutes at any one time. 3. The person or persons 
licensed to raise or lower goods outside of buildings 
shall idemnify and save harmless the city of Boston 
against all damages, costs and expenses, to which it 
shall be subjected on account of the acts of the said 
person or persons under such license. 4. The license 
may be revoked at the pleasure of the Board of 
Aldermen. 

Passed. 

Alderman, Bigelow from.the Committee on Licenses, 
reported in favor of granting the applications of A. 
P. Peck to give dramatic readings at Music Hall by 
Miss Cushmau; C. M. Charter, to exhibit a panorama 
at Sumner Hall, East Boston, January 20 and 22; E. 
W. Murray, for hack stand at corner of Tremouc and 
Clarendon streets; Simon Levy, to deal in second- 
hand clothing at 449 Main street, Charlestown; Moore 
& Co., for two wagon licenses; Charles Wells, Jr., 
et al., for transfer of wagon lioenset ; William Roach, 
for wagon stand at 197 Third street; Mrs. M. H. 
Chase, 8 Haywaid place, L. Fuhil & Co., 27 Kingston 
istreet, for victualler's license; Addison P.Wheelock, 
et al., for transfer of hack licenses; William R. Wat- 
son, for auctioneer's license at 148 Hanover street; 
Thomas J. Keogh, to keep a billiard table at 21 Per- 
kins street, Charlestown; Ellen M. Collins, to keep 
intelligence office at 147 Charles street; Mary J. 
McMulUin, to keep intelligence office at 81 Charles 
street. Severally accepted. 

Alderman Bigelow, from the same committee, re- 
ported "leave to withdraw" on the applications of 
C. H. Snoiv, 105 Northampton street; Dennis Mur- 
phy, 533 Washington street; and William Taylor, 85 
Bunker-Hill street, for victualler's license. Sever- 
ally accepted. 

Oh motion of Alderman Bigelow, an order was 
passed fixing the usual regulations for the granting 
of licenses to minors for the pursuit of any avoca- 
tion, the terms and conditions of which shall be in- 
serted in i he certificate. 

On mation of Alderman Stebbins — 

Ordered, That the Chairman of the Board of Alder- 
men be authorized to approve bills for expenses in- 
curred by the Board of Aldermen, and the standing 
committees of the Board not having charge of any 
appropriations; also by individual members of the 
Board while engaged in the discharge of official duty; 
the amount of said bills to be charged to the appro- 
priations for Contingent Expenses of the Board of 
Aldermen. 

Passed. 

Alderman Power submitted a revised schedule of 
assessments for the construction of a sewer in Sixth 
street, together with an order annulling the original 
schedule and order passed Oct. 9, 1873, and an order 
for the collection of the i-ums named in the revised 
list. The orders were passed. 

On motion of Alderman Power — 

Ordered, That $207 62 be abated from the assess- 
ment of Laban Pratt, for a sewer in Taylor street, 
and the same amount be assessed upon Albert T. 
Stearns; that $2;i3 40 be abated from Porter & Syl- 
vester, for a sewer in Buckingham street, and tne 
same amount assessed upon George W. Merserve; 
that $21 17 be abated from Cornelius Driscoll, for a 
sewer in Taylor street, and the same amount assessed 



20 



BOARD OF AL3DERMEN, 



upon Thomas J. McGrail; that $37 01 be abated from 
South Boston Iron Company, for u sewer in Sixth 
street, and the same amount lie assessed upon the 
South Boston Horse Railroad Company; that $15 14 
be abated from the assessment on Levi B. (iay, for a 
sewer in Washington street, on account of over- 
estimate of land; that the following abatements be 
made on account of previous i)ayments and agree- 
ments: Calvin (;. Page's heirs, Gouch street, $20; 
Phinehas B. Smith, Jr., SlMwmut avenue, $sj;il 12; 
Henry T. Woods, el al., do., $490 01; Charles Hul- 
bert, do., $181 iW; John Harney, Alpine street, 
$111 .50; Isaac Waterman's heirs, do., $92 92; James 
Guild, do., $55 75; Albert T. Stearns, High street, 
$33 13. 

Passed. 

On motion of Alderman Emery — 

Ordered, That so mucli of the Mayor's address as 
relates to a new Court House be referred to the Com- 
mittee on County Buildings. 

Passed. 

On motion of Alderman Worthington— 

Ordered. That the list of jurors in this city, who 
are qualified to serve in the several courts of the 
County of Suffolli, be revised by this Board, and be 
posted in the City Hall and Court House, and be 
thereafterwards submitted to the Common Council 
for revision and acceptance, pursuant to law. 

Passed. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Health be au- 
thorized, (luring the present municipal year, to make 
contracts subject to the supervision of the Commit- 
tee on Health, for the purchase of such quantities of 
hay or gram and for such horses and exclianges as his 
department may from time to time require; also for 
such material as shall be required for the use of this 
department. 

Passed. 

Alderman Worthington, from the Committee on 
Health, reported in favor of granting the petitions of 
Joseph Sidwell, Walter Smith and John McCarty, for 
leave to occupy wooden stables. Severally accepted. 

On motion of Alderman Hams- 
Ordered, That the almshouse formerly belonging 
to the city of Charlestown be placed in the care and 
custody of the Directors for Public Institutions, who 
are hereby requested to furnish the necessary over- 
sight and supplies for the inmates of that building. 

Passed. 

Alderman Harris, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported orders to pay, as follows: 

Frances S. W. Browne, $74, for land taken from 
heirs of Jonathan Whitney by extension of Columbus 
, avenue to Park square. Passed. 

Heirs of Zabdiel B. Adams, $3003 75, for widening 
Pearl street. Kead once. 

Heirs of J. H. Pearson, $18,157, for widening Broad 
street. Read once. 

On motion of Alderman Harris — 

Whereas, It appears of record tbat the County 
Commissioners for the County of Middlesex did, on 
the first Tuesday of January, A. D. 1872, establish a 
highway in the town of Revere, formerly North 
Chelsea, and did, as authorized by statute, assess a 
portion of the damage upon the County of Suffolk, 
it is therefore 

Ordered, That the Treasurer be, and he is hereby, 
authorized to pay to the following-named persons 
the sums set against their respeciive names for dam- 
ages caused by the action of the County Commission- 
ers of Middlesex in establishing a highway in Revere, 
formerly North Chelsea, on the first Tuesday of Jan- 
uary, A. D. 1872, upon their presenting a certificate, 
signed by the selectmen of Revere, that the land 
over which the highway is established is in the town 
of Revere, and has been entered upon and possession 
taken, and also upon their giving an acquittance and 
discharge for all damages, costs and expenses caused 
to and incurred by them on account of said action of 
the County Commissioners; said sums to be charged 
to the appropriation for the County of Sufiolk, name- 
ly: J. H. Ricker, $100; William O. Hall, $100; Tim- 
othy Wilson, $25. Read once. 

On motion of Alderman Cutter — 

Ordered, That so much of the Mayor's address as 
relates to the Police Department be referred to the 
Committee on Police, with the request that they give 
early and especial consideration to the Mayor's rec- 
ommendation for the establishment of a mounted 
patrol for the suburban districts. 

Passed. 

CITY I'ROPERTY IN WARD 19. 

On motion of Alderman W^orthington — 
Ordered. That the Committee on Public Buildings 
be requested to inquire as to tlie manner in which the 
building belonging to the city of Boston, known as 
Wilson's Hotel, in Ward 19, is occupied at the pres- 
ent time, and report thereon to the City Council. 



Alderman Stebbins— I move to amend by adding 
the words, "and that said committee be requested to 
consider the expediency of disposing of said proper- 
ty by auction or otherwise, and report at the next 
meeting of this Board." 

Alderman Worthington— I hope that amendment 
will not be attached to the order. The city ought to 
know what sort of a house it owns and how it is oc- 
cupied. Something ought to be done with that ho- 
tel, and to find out if it is put to the best use. 

Alderman Stebbins — I suppose every member of 
this Board knows what that hotel is used for as well 
today as they will a week hence, after the committee 
report. They know that the city of Boston will re- 
ceive $200 per month rent for it, and that the hotel is 
used as a first-class liquor establishment and for 
other purposes. I shall insist upon my amendment, 
and if the Board sees fit to vote it down, well and 
good. 

Alderman Cutter^I hope the amendment will pre- 
vail. I understand, from goc.d authority, tbat the 
house can be sold for three thousand dollars more 
than we are to pay for it. If that is so I hope it will 
be done. 

Alderman W^orthington — I don't believe that offer 
can be taken up. I understand it was made on con- 
dition that certain things be put in. I don't think 
the city can sell it for what it will have to pay for it 
when the note comes due next May. The other mat- 
ter should be reported on and this disgrace to the 
city stopped. 

Alderman Emery — I think the time mentioned in 
the amendment is too short. 

Alderman Stebbins — I will withdraw that portion 
of the amendment. 

Alderman Emery— It is very necessary that the 
thing should be done. 

Alderman Peters— I move to amend the amend- 
ment by substituting the words "to report two weeks 
from today." 

Alderman Cutter— The property is ours, and I don't 
believe it is necessary to run it down. Let us get all 
we can for it. I had the statement from one of the 
selectmen that we could get what I said. 

Alderman Brooks— It seems to me that the amend- 
ment, allowing two weeks from today, is unneces- 
sary. 

Alderman Peters — I thought it was the duty of the 
Board not to allow the committee to spend too much 
time at a hotel that is occupied in the manner of 
which the gentleman speaks. I thought it best to 
limit the committee to a certain time. 

The amendment of Alderman Peters was adopted, 
and the question recurred on Alderman Stebbins's 
amendment as amended. 

Alderman Worthington— I think that amendment 
should come in a separate order. It seems to me 
that it will defeat the point we want to make. I hope 
the Alderman will draw an order and submit it at 
once, that it may be fairly considered. I will join 
most heartily with him if he will draw a separate or- 
der. 

Alderman Power — I can't see anything for the com- 
mittee to do except what is embodied in the amend- 
ment of Alderman Stebbins. Everybody knows what 
the house is carried on for. If it is wished to facili- 
tate matters, I hope the amendment will prevail. 

Alderman Worthington— I am surprised at the 
knowledge gentlemen possess of what is going on in 
that house. I don't believe any one here knows. I 
don't, but I want to know what is done with the city 
property. 

Al'ierman Peters — As I understand the whole mo- 
tion, the committae can report on the first part of 
the order at any time — at the next meeting if they 
choose— and on the proposed sale two weeks from 
today. That allows them time enough to report. If 
the committee don't know now what the house is oc- 
cupied for, one day's investigation will give them all 
they desire. 

Alderman Harris called for a division of the ques- 
tion. 

Alderman W^orthington raised the point that the 
question was on an amendment and could not be di- 
vided. 

Alderman Cutter inquired if the amendment had 
not been already adopted. 

The Chair stated that the amendment to the 
amendment had passed, and the question was on the 
amendment as amended. 

The amendment as amended was adopted. Alder- 
man Harris withdrew the request for a division of 
the question, and the order as amended was passed. 

REPORT OP COCHITUATE WATER BOAKD. 

Alderm-an Cutter presented the report of the Co- 
chituate Water Board (City Doc. No. 1:34 of 1873), on 
reply to an order of the City Council of October 13, 
1873, relating to the available quantity and purity, of 



JANUARY 19 



18 7 4r, 



SL 



the Mystic water and to other matters connected 
with an additional water supply for Boston. Alder- 
derman Cutter stated that he had some plans which 
the members conld examine at their leisure. The 
report was sent down. 

The board reply that its attention was called to the 
Mystic Pond as a source of supply for this city some 
two years since by their engineer (see City Doc. 
No. 2!l, 1873), but after due consideration it was dis- 
missed from the list of practicable sources, which the 
Water Board thought its duty to recommend to the 
City Government; but after the receipt of the above- 
named order of inquiry, and recognizins; the wide 
difl'erences of opinion exis^ting in the community as 
to the quality of the water as well as to the capacity 
of the Mystic basin as a source of permanent supply 
for the city of Boston, the board, as a matter of jus- 
tice to itself and its engineer, has thought it judi- 
cious and proptr to have the whole subject investi- 
gated independently, by thoroughly competent per- 
sons, so that, after the investigations were closed 
and the facts presented, the questions should be defi- 
nitely settled in every reasonable mind. With these 
views, the services of two eminent hydranlic engi- 
neers, Mr. James P. Kirkwood of Brooklyn, N. Y., 
and Mr. James B. Francis of Lowell, Mass., 
were secured as an Engineering Commission. 
and the board was equally fortunate in secur- 
ing Professor E. N. Horsfora of Cambridge, 
to investigate as to the purity of the water. 
The facts given with regard to the Mystic basin 
are in close approximation to the information 
thst was already in possession of the board, 
from the report of its engineer (the prenent 
City Engineer), and stated in general terms in the 
City Document above referred to, and show not only 
that the extravagant claims made for this basin as a 
.source of permanent supply were, in a large degree, 
unfounded, but that an imperative duty exists for 
the city to take the most effectual means for securing 
thai t^upply from some other and more practicable 
source, for its rapidly increasing territory, population 
and industries, at the earliest moTient. The report 
of Messrs. Kirkwood and Francis states, that by util- 
izing (at an expense of •$9()4,.5fi2 for storage reser- 
voirs) all the available storage capacity of the Mystic 
basins, inclufling the lower Mystic Lake, a total sup- 
ply of ]8,000,000 gallons daily may be secured, and 
that a more moderate expenditure for reservoirs will 
pr'>vide a supply from which a surplus of about 
.5,000,000 gallons may be applied to the use of Boston, 
until 1880 or thereabouts, when the increasing de- 
mands of Charlestown and East Boston, and the 
towns depending upon the Mystic works, will begin 
to curtail it. It is also stated that the Cochituate 
conduit should not be relied on ''to convey more 
than 17,000,000 gallons in any one day." These state- 
ments sliould be considered together, in computing 
the total supply available to Boston for the ne.xt few 
years. 

The consutpption in Boston during 1873 was about 
18,000,000 gallons daily, and largely in excess" of the 
previous year, due partly to a reckless use of hand 
hose, leakage in the burnt district, and an increased 
head in portions of the city, as well as to the in- 
creased number of water takers. The consumption 
is very unequal in cilfercnt months, and to maintain 
the supply during the summer month.-^ it was found 
necessary to use the conduit under a pressure that 
would give a flow of over 20,000,000 gallons in twenty- 
four hours, and even then the reservoirs were drawn 
down to a point that reduced materially the water 
held in reserve to supply the city in case of accident 
to the conduit. If the maximum How of the conduit 
is to be limited to 17,000 000 gallons in twenty-four 
hours, the supply will not on an average much, if at 
all. exceed 1.^,000.000 gallons daily. To operate the 
Cochituate works safely an additional supply of 
3.000,000 gallons daily is required at once; and the 
supply which can he safely obtained from the 
Cochituate works, combined with that which may 
be secured from the Mystic (some two vears hence), 
will give an excess of only 2,000,000 gallons daily, 
above the use of the past year, to meet the future in- 
crease in consumption, which will follow from in- 
crease of pojiulation, by natural growth and by 
annexation. By using all the storage area offered by 
the Mystic basin this excess may be increased to 
some four or live millions, an amount which, at the 
rate of increase in water-takers that has ruled for the 
past few years, will be absorbed in four or five sea- 
sons. 

If the conduit is to be operated as it was found 
necessary to operate it the past year (in a manner 
which it is proper to say the Water Boaid and its 
officers consider decidedly unsafe), the excess will be 
further increased by about three millions of gallons. 
This is upon the supposition that the Cochituate 
watershed will yield a supply of 18.000,000 gallons 



daily; but the fact is it cannot be relied upon to do 
so. The following table exhibits the total quantities 
of water, stated in daily averages, that entered the 
lake from its watershed during various year, and of 
which in some years a large portion was necessarily 
wasted over the dam during floods: 

Year. Gallons per day. Year. Gallons per day. 

1853 17,873,800 1858 17,759,013 

I860 n,714,0ti5 1864 15.370,152 

1866 14,265,280 1871 13,197,800 

The yield of the Cochituate watershed in a season 
of extreme drought has been estimated by the City 
Engineer, Mr. Joseph P. Davis, at 12,000,000 gallons 
daily; but, as seen above, in 1871, which cannot be 
considered such a season, it actually was only 13,197,- 
800 gallons. Add to this the 5,000,000 gallons that 
may be taken from the Mystic, and there is 18,000,000 
gallons, just equal to the consumption of the past 
year, 1873. To state the case plainly, and it does 
seem that the time has come to so state it, this city 
will be dependent upon good fortune, that is, upon 
heavy rains and freedom from accident to the works, 
for a full supply of water, during the next few years, 
even if the Mystic be drawn upon, unless an auxiliary 
supply is taken from the Sudbury River, as in 1872. 
As matters now stand, the city has no rights in the 
Sudbury River, and would unquestionably be pre- 
vented by the mill owners and others interested, 
from again drawing from it unless the river is legally 
seized under the act of the Legislature authorizing 
the taking. If it be decided to abandon the Sudbury- 
River project, the city will be forced to lelv upon the 
Cochituate and Mystic districts, from which, by an 
expenditure of some one and a half millions of dol- 
lars upon the latter, in two years a total daily supply 
of about 22.000,000 gallons can be furnished; tiro- 
vided that the rainfall is favorable, and the Cochitu- 
ate conduit is operated under objectionaiile pressure 
during the months of greatest consumption. 

During the early months of 1872, while the pump- 
ing engines were at work in Lake Cochituate, in con- 
sequence of the unprecedentedly low state of the 
waier, application was made by the city to the Legis- 
lature for power to take water from an independent 
source of supply; and the Water Board was informed 
by the legislative committee that it must limit itself 
to two sources, though the Board had asked for a 
general act with the design of selecting the best 
source, after a careful study and survey of the whole 
question. A pretty thorough examination had been 
hurriedly made of the different available water dis- 
tricts within reasonable distance from the city, in- 
cluding the Ipswich and Saugus rivers at the north, 
the great lakes of the Middleborough district at the 
south, and the Merrimac River at the northwest. All 
these were rejected, however, either for their large 
cost, impurity of water, difliculty of connection with 
the present system of works, want of storage capaci- 
ty, or insuflicient amount of \< ater for the needs of 
the distant future. The onl.y course, therefore, was 
to look to the west, where were found the Charles, 
Sudbury. Assabet and Nashua rivers and Lake Quin- 
sigamond, which, combined, would give a daily sup- 
ply of 220,000.000 gallons, and all of" which could be 
brought to Chestnut-Hill Reservoir in the same con- 
duit. The Water Board selected the Charles and 
Sudbury rivers ; but during the hearing before 
the legislative committee a strong and decided 
opposition was made lo the taking of the 
Charles River, except upon such conditions 
and restrictions as were entirely inadmissable: 
and therefore, upon the promise of the commit- 
tee to report a favorable bill for the Sudbury, the 
Charles was dropped and a bill for the Sudbury was 
reported and passed by the Legislature. Doubtless the 
facility with which the waterof the river could be turn- 
ed into Lake Cochituate to supply a pressing temjjo- 
lary want in that basin had some considerable weight 
in the selection; but careful study and survey of its 
capabilities as a source of pern.anent supply revealed 
facts of a very favorable character. These were, the 
large amount and good quality of the water; its ex- 
cellent storage facilities and easy control; compar- 
atively moderate cost of construction, the shortness 
of the conduit line to Chestnut-Hill Reservoir, the 
great point of distribution; and the comparative 
present and prospective freedom from pollution of 
the watershed. Its combined value in all these es- 
sentials is such that the Water Board has seen no 
reason to regret its selection or doubt the wisdom of 
the choice. The rapidity with which its waters can 
be turned into the lake has already been proved at a 
time of some considerable public peril. 

I'he Sudbury, with its ample storage basins, in a 
seastnof drought will yield a minimum supply of 
40,000,000 gallons daily, and in favorable seasons a 
supply of .50,000,000 gallons or more; should occasion 
demand in the future, it can be easily connected 



22 



BOARIJ> OF ALDERIVLEN. 



with the Assabet Kivcr, from which nearly an equal 
iiiiioiint can ho drawn, and the practicability of ils 
connuction with the other water districts named 
above is an equally assured fact. The connection 
with the Charles Hiver would be by punipiiisr works 
at South Natick, all the others by Kravitation. la 
tlie Siidhurv Kivi'r scheme of works, not only has 
the needs of the immediate present lieen duly con- 
sidered, but the future has been amply cared for. 
Kll'orts seem to have been made to prejudice the 
Sudbury Hiver scheme, by misrepresentiii;^ its cost, 
and the time requind for its construction. It has 
been claimed that it will cost between twelve and 
fifteen millions of dolhirs, and that it cannot be com- 
pleted short of ten or twelve years' time. 

Those making these misrepresentations entirely 
ienore tho careful and exhaustive surveys, and the 
liberal estimates founded upon them by <iur able and 
experienced engineers. The Water Board has no 
hesitation in saying there is not tlie slightest foun- 
dation for such statements, that there is no re-ison 
for distrusting the professional skill of, or the facts 
and estimates given by the engineers in their report 
as to the cost or the time required for construction: 
most certainly not upon the reckless statemei ts of 
those having no practical experience in engineering 
works. So far as the amount of water or mill dam- 
ages to be paid is concerned, tlie board can only say 
that this matter will be determined before a Massa- 
chusetts court and jury, and upon competent evi- 
dence as to th« real amount of damage caused by 
diverting the water of the river; It has t.o fear but 
that the verdict will be an eqnitable one, and the 
damages not excessive. But it must not be forgot- 
ten that the city of Boston cannot take water from 
any practicable source witlmnt paying for it, and it is 
not at all probable that the co^t will be larger, in 
proportion, for ilie Sudbury Kiver, than for water 
taken from any other source. 

When the pressnt Cochituate conduit was construct- 
ed, it was generally considered that the city had se- 
cured an ample water supply for the next fifty years 
at least. But a little more than one-half of that pe- 
riod has passed, with the results which are now un- 
der consideration. The lesson is a very useful one, 
not only to the City Government, but to all concern- 
ed. After mature deliberation upon all the numer- 
ous questions involved in the general subject of se- 
curing a permanent and ample supply of water for 
domestic, fire, manufacturing, and other uses for a 
rapidly growing community like this, the Water 
Board finds ample reasons for again recommending 
the most energetic action for the construction and 
early completion of the Sudbury River supply for the 
city of Boston. The adoption of any policy which 
shall restrict the supply of water for all legitimate 
uses, will be a mistaken and unfortunate one; and 
this will apply with great force to the territory re- 
cently annexed and that hereafter to be annexed, 
and with still greater force to the numerous moiiu- 
facturing Industries that are springing np in and near 
the city limits. The fear of an insufficient supply 
would tend to restrict and dwarf a great many indus- 
trial establishments in a very large degree, and pos- 



sibly lead to their location elsewhere. The Water 
Board feels that a great and growing city like this 
cannot afford to enr anger its progressive prosperity 
by failure to take the proper action to secure its con- 
tinuance. 

An order was passed by the City Council, Novem- 
ber 10, 1873, requesting the Water Board to have 
made a chemical analysis of the waters of Farm 
Pond. In comiilying with the request, the boaro has 
had also analyzed a sample taken from Sudhury Kiv- 
er, another from its most important tributary, Stony 
Brook, and two from Lake CocliituatC. 

The analyses, the results ol which are given in the 
following table, have been made by Messrs. 
Merrick and Gray, analytical chemists, who had no 
knowledge of where the samples were taken: 
Grains in U. S. gal. 



Suspended matte'-. 

Inoigauie 

Organic 



0..W 
1.B9 



a. 39 
1.80 



Total 1 427 



4.50 



Sllicia. oxide Iron, 
alumina, etc 

Chlorine as Chlo- 
ride Sodium 

Album'dAui'onla J 

Ammonia ( 



0.73 10.70 



F 



u =, o 



Oj - 
0.40 



3.37 ! 2.89 i 3.21 1 4.5S 



A 


B 





D 


E 






>, 




c. 






t'.M 


" u 


STsb 


S" ^ 




«• 


Op 

S5 




IK 


30- 




3 



0.2:^ I 0.15 
1.98 I 1.75 
1.16 I 0.99 



0.24 I 

1.8T 
1.10 



0.54 0.38 



0.40 0.70 



0,35 lO.lO 35 10.35 0.32 |0.30 
0.0147 10.0139 0.016 10.013 0.012 0.015 
0.003 0.004 10.004 !o.0O41 ,0005 ,0.004 



0.0177 10 0179 !0.02 lO.OlTl !0.017 !0.0i9 

A very thoroiieh examination of the whole length 
«f the conduit has been made by skilled experts fa- 
miliar with such structures, and the details of the ■ 
examination, reported by Mr. D. W. Cunningham, 
firsl-assistant-eniiineer of "New Supply," are here- 
with presented^for your consideration. While the con- 
duit will be operated with great care and closely watch- 
ed, and while there is but little fear of disaster hap- 
pening, yet measures have already been taken to meet 
any break in its weaker points by the construction of 
wooden Humes, ready to be applied at once at any 
exposed point; so that if any break should occur, it 
can be repaired in the shortest possible time. Whib 
the condition oi' the conduit is and has been for the 
past year a constant source of anxiety to the board, 
it trusts, by extra care and watchfulness, to avert 
any serious disaster that may imperil the uninter- 
rupted flow of Cochituate water to the city 

In conclusion, the board has the pleasure of stat- 
ing that the income for water is steadily increaoing 
from year to year, the receipts of the past year show- 
ing an advance over those of the previous year of 
over one hundred and seven thousand dollars. 

Appended to the report are the reports of Messrs. 
Kirkwood and Francis, Mr. Cunningham, Professor 
Horsford and others engaged in the investigation. 

On motion of Alderman Stebbins the Board ad- 
journed. 



23 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

JANUAKY ii'^, 1H74. 



The regular weekly meetins; of the Commou Coun- 
cil was hela at half-past seven o'cleck P. M., E. O. 
Shepard, President, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OP ALDERMEN. 

Petitions of Directors of East Boston Perries, In- 
spectors of Buildings, Bunker Hill Monument Asso- 
ciation, Gilman & Cheney, G. Washington Warren, 
et al., were referred in concurrence. 

Annual reports of city officers. (Printed City Docs. 
No8. 5, 6, 7, 11, 13. Report of Water Board 134, 1873- 
18744.) Severally placed on file. 

The order for ihe proposed e.xtension of Parker 
street came down referrea to Comniittee on Streets. 
The Council concurred. 

Order that the almhouse formerly belonging to 
Charlestown be placed in the care of the Directors 
for Public Institutions. Passed. 

Order authorizing the SuDcrintendent of Health to 
purchase hay and grain and other material requircsd 
m his department. Read once. 

CITY PROPERTY IN WARD NINETEEN. 

Order for the Committee on Public Buildings to 
inquire as to the manner in which the building be- 
longing to the city, known as Wilson's Hotel, in 
Ward 19, is occupied, and to consider the expediency 
of selling the same, came down passed. 

The question was on giving the order a second 
reading. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5—1 should like to have some 
explanation why this matter comes before us. I 
confess that I was not aware that the city cf Boston 
kept a hotel. If there is any gentleman here who can 
explain that matter I should like to hear from him. 
It is entirely new to me, as a member of the City 
Government, that the city of Boston is keeping a ho- 
tel, and it seems to me that that idea is suggested by 
the order before us. I was n't aware before that the 
city held any real estate in the Brighton District. I 
presume some gentleman here can explain, and I 
should be very glad to hear an explanation. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 moved to lay the order on the 
table. 

Mr. West of Ward 16—1 hope that motion will not 
prevail. I think a satisfactory explanation can be 
given for the order. 

Mr. Flynn — I will withdraw the motion to lay on 
the table. 

Mr. llunnewell of Ward 19— If the gentleman 
really wants an explanation it can be given in a very 
few words, and I think the Council will understand 
the reason for the order. Previous to the vote on 
annexation, a committee was appointed on the part 
of the citizens of Brighton to look up and purchase a 
suitable location for a town hall. The committee 
selected a site known as Wilson's Hotel, which hap- 
pened at that time to be used for hotel purposes. 
The committee considered that the best location for 
a hall and made such a report to the town meet- 
ing. That report was accepted, and subsequent- 
ly — I understand, for I was not present at the 
meeting— they were authorized to make the purchase 
of the land with the buildings upon it. The present 
occupants of the hotel made a proposition to the se- 
lectmen to continue the occupancy of the building at 
a rental of two hundred dollars per month. At that 
rate they have continued tenants at will ; the property 
came into the hands of the city of Boston, ajid they 
• till remain tenants at will under the city of Boston. 
It is in that way that the city of Boston became the 
owner of hotel property and the receiver of rent 
from that source. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7— Before this Council disposes 
of that property, it appears to me we ought to know 
what we are disposing of. 1 do not believe five 
members of this Council know what the property is 
and what is the value of the land. Therefore. I move 
the order be referred to the Committee on PuDlic 
Lands. 

Mr. Hunnewell of Ward 19—1 wish to say, in ex- 
planation of the latter part of the order, that I pre- 
sume that if its reference is made to the Committee 
on Public Buildings, no steps woald be taken to sell 
the property, as an advantageous sale could not prob- 
ably be made. Everything the city is doing in that 
district tends to enhance the value of the property, 
and I think the Committee on Public Buildings 
would see that it is injudicious to attempt to make a 
sale now. 



Mr. Burditt of Ward Ifi— I hope the motion of the 
gentleman from Ward 7 to refer to the Committee on 
Public Lands will not prevail. I am not actuated by 
any jealousy, as a member of one committee. The 
first part of the order is in regard to the manner in 
which the building is used, which is not entirely 
creditable to the city of Boston. As this is a buila- 
ing for which the city of Boston is receiving rent, it 
is eminently proper that the Committee on Public 
Buildings should have charge of the matter. It may 
not be a good time to sell the property, but it is a 
good time to see what disposition is made of it. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7—1 hope ttie motion will pre- 
vail, for this reason: I understand this lot contains 
about seventy-four thousand feet of land, and all the 
order contemplates is the sale of the building. Now 
I believe the disposition of the land belongs to the 
Committee on Public Lands, which is, in my judg- 
ment, the proper committee to have charge of this 
matter. 

Mr. Burditt of Ward 16— If the gentleman would ilke 
to have the order changed so that the Committee on 
Public Lands may have charue of the sale of the 
lands, I have no objections, but so far as any consid- 
eration of the use of the building I am opposed to its 
reference to that committee. It properly belongs to 
the Committee on Public Buildings. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 I would — 

The President — The gentleman is out of order, he 
having spoken once on this subject. 

Mr. Flynn — I merely wish to ask the gentleman 
whether he does not believe the Commiteee on Pub- 
lic Lands as Gompetenl to dispose of the building as 
the Committee on Public Buildings are. 

The President— The nentleman is out of order. 

Mr. Denny of Ward 9— That order contemplates 
just what this Council wishes to know.' The com- 
mittee is to investigate and learn what is the best 
disposition to make of that property. After they 
report we can act understandingly. Therefore I 
hope the motion to refer will not prevail, and that the 
order will pass. 

The motion to refer was lost, and the order was 
passed, in concurrence. 

BADGES. 

The order for a committee to procure suitable 
badges for the members of the Common Council 
came up as unfinished business, the question being 
oij giving it a second reading. 

Mr. Kimball of Ward fi— I desire, Mr. President, to 
move an amendment to the order by inserting before 
the word, 'members" the word "new," so that the 
order will read ''special committee to procure badges 
for new members," and, with the permission ot the 
Council, I desire to say a few words in support of 
the amendment. The custom of providing badges, 
at the expense of the city, for the members of the 
Government seems to have had its origin as far back 
as the year 18.05. A somewhat careful examination 
of the Auditor's reports prior to that date has failed 
to disclose the item "badges" under that name. It 
would appear fr<»m the cost of these articles as stated 
in the Auditor's reports of that year, and of the few 
succeeding years,that our predecessors had an eye to 
the useful rather than to the ornamental. They were 
content with a silver badge of moderate cost, and, in 
18,55, provided themselves with fifty silver badges at 
a total expense of $62 .50. For several years after- 
wards, whenever new badges were deemed necesary 
(and they were not so deemed each and every year) 
some plain and cheap ornament satisfied the tastes 
of the members or their notions of their duty. For, 
omitting the years 1856, 1858 and 1862, when no en- 
tries of moneys thus appropriated appear among the 
city's expenditures, I find that there were procured 
for the Government in 

1857—62 silver badges, costing $124 CO 

1859-49 " " " 120 00 

18GO-30 " " •' 60 00 

1861—40 '• " " 80 00 

,j,^, ), 45 silver .. S Council, >„„„,.__ ,,o on 

^•^•^^r^goM > Aldermen, > ''°*""^ ^53 on 

,„„, \ 48 fUver „ * Council, ) „ ,qo m 

'^''*< 8g<)ld J Aldermen, i '^ "" 

,afi- \ 30 silver .. 5 Couiicll > „ "u an 

1**''^' 4 gold 1 Aldermen, i '^ ^' 

is«« * 36 silver ., ^ Council, ) „ m nn 

^'**'*( 6gold /Aldermen,) "^ "" 

,„„,( .35 silver .. < Council, ) „ ne tai 

•'*'"; 7 gold (Aldermen,) "^ =* 

not exceeding, upon an average, in any one year, $3 
lor each badge, and in no year except the first (1857) 
does the full number of badges seem to have been 
provided. It was reserved for the Council of 1868 
to disregard all precedents and to set an ex- 
ample of extravagance not only to their suc- 
cessors, but also to all who hare since occupied 
any position in the City Government, by voting 
themselves sixty-two gold badges at an average cost 
of $20 each, and fifty silver badges at $2 a piece. 



JAInIIjARY 92 



1874r 



24r 



costing $1340; the silver perhaps for week days, 
and the gold for Sundays and holidays; while the 
Board of Aldermen obtained twelve gold badges 
costing $229. The Council of 1869 wisely limited the 
distriDutiou of badges to newly elected members, 
and for that year thirty gold badges, costing $546, 
were found sufficient for this branch, and eleven 
gold badges, at a cost of $187, for the other. In 1870, 
and in every year since, all regard for economy seems 
lost sight of, and the various Auditors' reports show 
the following sums expended for badges: 

1870— Sixty-eight gold, for Council, averaging $18 
and upwards, $1250; twelve gold, for Aldermen, each 
$40. $480,-$1730. 

1871 -Sixty-six gold, for Council, at $16 each, 
$1056. 

1872— Sixty-eight gold, for Council, at $16 each, 
$1088; twelve silver, for Aldermen, at $3 each, $.36,— 
$1124. 

1873— Seventy-five gold, for Council, $1114, includ- 
ing seven for reporters, and four for Clerk, Messen- 
ger and their assistants. 

I have taken the pains, Mr. President, to collect 
these facts and figures, hoping thereby to induce the 
Council to imitate the economy of earlier years and 
to avoid the extravagance of later years. Even if I 
were disposed to admit, sir, the necessity and pro- 
priety of furnishing each member of this body with 
a suitable badge, I could not admit the necessity of 
providing badges for those who already have them; 
and believing that it is our manifest duty at all times 
to incur none but necessary expenses, and more 
especially so in a year like the present, when the 
pressing and not to be avoided needs of the cit}- are 

freater than ever before,! appeal to the old mem- 
ers not to vote themselves new badges thie year, 
and to the new members to refuse to lend their aid 
to any expenditure for this purpose. I hope. Mr. 
President, thnt my amendment will meet with the 
unanimous approval of the members present. 

Mr. Peabody of Ward 9— As one of the new mem- 
bers, I don't wish the city to expend any money for 
me. But if we are to have them, I should prefer to 
carry a silver badge to a gold one, and I move to in- 
sert the word "filver" before the word ''badge." 

Mr. West of Ward 16— J have been through this 
badge question for the last three years, and of one 
thing I am satisfied, that it Is n't worth while to 
waste any time talking about them. I have known 
the Council to waste by talking four times what The 
badges cost. Why, we have had this matter on the 
docket for six months. To provide badges for the 
new members only is impossible— besides we are all 
new members, technically. The old badges have 
"1873" on them, and that would n't do for 1874. The 
old members must have new badges. I shall be sat- 
isfied, and I hope the Council will have a new, plain 
badge, without any year or name on it, and leave 
them here when the members vacate their seats, so 
that we may settle the question once and for all. 
It will do just as well, only it is a little different 
color. 

Mr. Dacey of Ward 20—1 do n't know but it may be 
necessary for a member of the Common Council to 
ha»'e a badge. I was reading the other day an ac- 
count of a difficulty between a member of a Common 
Council and a policeman, and to show his authority 
the member of the Common Council displayed his 
badge. But it did n't have any eflect. I do not be- 
lieve in the necessity for badges. The taxpayers 
sent us here to do their business, and it is p.epos- 
terous for us to vote away the people's money in that 
way. If all the gentlemen were to put their badges 
upon themselves, one would think they were all field- 
marshals. I think it best to do our business and then 
retire, as the old gentleman did his farming. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5 — I want to say a single word 
here. I am one of the old members. As far back as 
1857 I received a little tin thing, and kept it 
awhile, but I don't know where it is now. 
It seems to me we are beginning this thing 
in a dreadfully small way. We are going in 
at the spicket, and before the year is over 
we shall go out at the bunghole. We begin to talk 
about badges for members. Is there no "dignity in 
this Council ? When a member of this Council is in a 
public place, does he not desire to show that he is 
clothed with some little authority? Are we not all 
new members ? I look upon myself as a new member 
for this year. If any one is entitled to a badge 
every member is. I am in fivor of something, so 
that each member, when called upon in a public or 
private position, shall be able to show that he is a 
member of this Council, and the only way he can 
show it is by the authority of a badge. When mem- 
bers are travelling abroad, as they are sometimes 
necessitated to do with committees, they want some- 
thing to show that they are members of this body. 
I don't consider this a matter of extravagance 



at all. The gentleman has well said that w 
consume more time in talking than the badges 
cost. I hope this order will pass without any 
amenament. As to dictating whether it shall be 
silver or gold or tin, I say let us leave that to the 
committee. Are we not authorized by authority of 
the Mayor of Boston and vote of the Board of Al- 
dermen to act as special policemen? That is the cus- 
tomary rule. I don't consider this expenditure as 
amounting to anything. We undertake to debate 
and oppose a little matter which costs a thousand 
dollars — why I undertake to say that an appropria- 
tion for a million would pass without any discussion. 
That has been the history of the thing for several years 
past, and we will find before many months that all 
this picayune business is in at the spicket and out at 
the bunghole. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward 16— I can see nothing incon- 
sistent with the dignity of a member of this Council, 
either in his individual capacity or collectively, in 
discussing the proonety or impropriety of expending 
any money, how small so ever the sum may be. I 
heartily concur with the gentleman from Ward 5, 
that the expense is not great, and that it may be left 
to the discretion of the committee which shall be 
appointed to select these badges Furthermore, the 
gentleman has asked if we are a dignified body. I 
can certainly reply that in any body of which the 
gentleman from Ward 5 is a member, there is a cer- 
tain amount of dignity, and the slur sought to be 
cast upon these gentlemen is uncalled for. I hope 
the Council will leave it to the comuiittee to select 
Buch badges as they see fit. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7—1 would inquire whether the 
usual order requesting the Mayor to appoint the 
members of the Common Council special police ofll- 
cers has been put in. 

The President— It has not. 

Mr. Plynn of Ward 7— Then I move that the order 
lie upon the table until the Mayor shall have appoint- 
ed the Council special police offlers. 

The motion was carried. 

FROM THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

The President submitted orders from the School 
Committee for the fitting up of a room in the English 
High Schoolhonse on Bedford street to be used for in- 
struction in drawing, and requesting the City Coun- 
cil to fit, up a suitable room in the Girls' High School 
building on West Newton street to be used for in- 
struction in drawing. 

Severally referred, on motion of Mr. West of Ward 
16, to the Committee on Public Instruction, 

THE BQRRILL CLAIM. 

Mr. Thacher of Ward 15 presented the petition of 
Charles Burrill, that his claim for compensation for 
services in obtaining credits to I he quota of the city 
in 1864 may be referred to three disinterested persons, 
to be appointed by the Mayor, to decide in relation 
thereto. 

Mr. Thacher moved that the petition be referred to 
the Committee on Claims. 

Mr. Train of Ward 13—1 hope that reference will 
not be made. This matter has been before this City 
Government so long, and last year was thoroughly, 
patiently, laboriously and intelligently examined, I 
think it should be referred to the Committee of the 
Whole, and I shall make that motion, that it be re- 
ferred to the Council itself, and that it be specially 
assigned f'>r consideration at some future meeting. 
My reasons are these: The printed reports, which 
have cost no small amount of money, are at the 
service of this Council, and every new member can 
post himself from those reports just as well as 
if a new examination were gone into. I do not think 
any new light or argument can be produced. I am 
perfectly satisfied that some compensation is due 
Mr. Burrill. We can save the Committee on Claims 
a great deal of labor by referring it to the Council, 
and that will be the best way to settle the matter. 

Mr. Noyes of Ward 5— As all matters relating to 
claims are referred to the Committee on Claims it 
seems to me this petition should go to that commit- 
tee. If they report that it should be referret'. t uia 
Committee of the Whole, then the Council can do so. 

Mr. Train of Ward 1.3—1 merely wanted to relieve 
myself of an indigestible load which I have had on 
my stomach for a year. I do not wish to detract anyth- 
ing from the Committee on Claims. I am willing to go 
over the ground again if it is necessary, but no new 
light can be shown on this subject. 

Mr. Noyes of Ward 5—1 am not a member of the 
Committee on Claims, but I think all matters relating 
to claims should go before that committee. If the 
committee don't see fit to report as prayed for, then 
the Council can do what they please. 

Mr. Train of Ward 13— This brings in the same — 

The President— The gentleman is out of order. 






COMMON OOTJlSrOIL, 



The petition was referred ;to tlie Committee on 
Claims. 

rKTlTIONS rUESENTED ANI) ItEFERUED. 

By Mr. Tliachcr of Ward 1,'j — Petition of Boston 
Gas Liciht Company, for leave to erect a wooden build- 
ing on tlieir Coininen.ial-street wharf for a coal ele- 
vator. Refeneil to iC^omraittee on Survey and lu- 
epection of l>uikliiij;s. 

By Mr. Pray of Ward 21— Petition of Company A 
First Battalion of Infantry, for an appropriation for 
rent for new armory. Keferred to Committee on 
Armories. 

ELECTIONS. 

Mr. Woods of Ward 8 submitted a report from 
the Standing Committee on Elections, to whom was 
referred the petition of (i. W. Sherman and others, 
for a recount of the votes cast for members of the 
Common Council at the last election in VVard 15. 
They have carefully recounted the original ballots in 
the i)0S8ession of the City Clerk, with the following 
result: William G. Thacher had 084. Henry W. Put- 
nam .5^7, Henry W. Fuller .'53.5, Frederick Bleiler 531, 
William Meas^her 490, Michael Kelly 4(iT, James M. 
Fraiiey 433, Albert H. Hopkins 334, Pierpont Ed- 
wards 187, Solomon Thomas 15, Andrew Marshall 15, 
John Tairsrart 8, Solomon Sanborn 14, H. J. Board- 
man 1. William II. Jones 1, Cbarles G. Davis 1, 
Ebenezer Adams 1, R. E. Weeks 1. It appears, 
therefore, that William G. Thacher, Henry W. Put- 
nam, Henry W. Fuller and Frederick Bleiler, who 
now occupy seats in the Council, were duly 
elected. 

The report was accepted. 

THE WATER SUPI'LY. 

Mr. Pease of Ward 1 submitted a report from the 
Joint Standing Committee on Water, to whom was 
referred so much of the Mayor's address as relates 
10 the subject of enlargini; the water works, and to 
whom was also referred, as a part of the unlinished 
business of the last City Council, the order authoriz- 
ing the Cochituate Water Board to take and convey 
to and into and through the city the waters of Sud- 
bury River and Farm Pond, as provided by chapter 
177 of the acts of the year 1872. The committee, 
having considered the subject, report that 
the examinations which have been made by 
the able hydraulic engineers appointed by the 
M'ater Board, have demonstrated the necessity of 
procuring a permanent additional supply of pure 
water from the Sudbury-River source. The future 
requirements of the city cannot be met in any other 
way; and any effort to avoid expense at this time by 
resorting to temporary expedients will only result In 
greatly increased expenses hereafter. Tlie sul)ject 
has been so fully and clearly presented in the message 
from the Mayor, and the reports of the Water Board 
and Engineers, that the committee do not feel called 
upon to enter into details here; and they would, 
therefore, recommend the passage of the accompany- 
ing order: 

Pursuant to the provisions of section 1 of chapter 
177 of the acts of 1872, it is hereby. 

Ordered. That the Cochituate Water Board, as the 
agent of the city of Boston, be and it is hereby 
directed to take, hold and convey to, into and through 
said city, all the water of Sudbury River, so called; 
said water to be taken at any ponit or points within 
the town of Framinghan., or higher up on said river, 
and the water of Faim Pond, so called, in said town 
of Framingham. and the waters which may flow into 
and from said river and pond, and to take any water 
rights in or upon said river or pond, in or above the 
town of Framingham or connected therewith. Said 
Cochituate Water Board is also hereby directed, 
as the agent of this city, to take and hold, 
by purchase or otherwise, in connection with 
said sources of supply, any lands and real estate 
necessary for increasing or preserving the purity 
of the water, or for laying, building and main- 
taining aqueducts, water courses, reservoirs, 
dams, buildings, machinery and other structures and 
appliances, with their accessories, for conducting, 
elevating, purifying, storing, discharging, disposing 
of and distributing water; and also to take and hold 
any land (excepting any in the town of Framingham 
heretofore taken or purchased by any railroad com- 
pany) on the margin of said sources of supply, not 
exceeding five rods in width from the high-water 
line of .said river, storage reservoirs or pond, so far 
as may be necessary, in the opinion of said Water 
Board, for the preservation and purity of the same, 
for the purpose of furnishing a supply of pure water 
for the city of Boston; the expense of the taking 
of said waters and lands aforesaid to be charged to 
the appropriation already existing therefor. 

The question was on giving the order a second 
reading. 



Mr. Flynu of Ward 7— Hce is a chance to practice 
economy; not on hudires. but on this order. This 
matter is going to involve the city in at leai-t eight 
or nine million dollars expense. I hope that the or- 
der will at least lie over and not take a second read- 
ing tonight. 

Mr. Pease of Ward 1 asked if the order would not 
lie over under the rule. 

The President replied that it would. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 — I'lien I move that it be spe- 
cially assigned for consideration two weeks from to- 
night, at half-past eight o'clock. 

Mr. iJean of Ward 12 moved to amend, so that the 
report and order might be printed. 

Mr. Flynn accepted the amendment. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward .5—1 hoi>e an extraordinary num- 
ber of copies of the order will be printed, that the 
people may know what is going to be done. If it 
were going to take the whole Slate of Massachusetts 
it couldn't be any more sweeping. It affects all the 
rights on Sudbury and Concora rivers and the 
towns between here and P'ramingham. The 
gentleman says eight or nine millions — I have 
not any doubt that it will amount to that, and 
a large sum in addition. There are eminent legal 
gentlemen now waiting to bring their suits for dam- 
ages the mcmient that order is carried out. The mo- 
ment the City of Boston attempts to take the terri- 
tory contemplated in that order, that moment there 
will commence lawsuits innumerable, and I might 
say interminable. Before we commence to do that, 
let every gentleman undertake to study it carefully in 
all its hearings. I should hope that the matter will 
be delayed long enough for the citizens of Boston to 
instruct their lepresenlatives how to vote upon it. 
There will he almost an unlimited amount of dam- 
ages if this order is adopted. It has been said that 
one gr«at object in having Charlestown annexed to 
the city of Boston was that we might procure an 
abundant supply of water. That was the great argu- 
irent. It was the salient point; it was one that the 
people considered and acted upon, as they had a right 
to do. Now, we are told what? That Mystic water 
is good for nothing — or substantially that. We are 
told by our friends from East Boston that it is the 
worst stuff they ever had and they don't want it. 
That may or may not be true. In my reading during 
the last few months I nave seen statements of chemi- 
cal tests which pronounce Mystic water to be the pur- 
est in the country. Now we have these 
contrary reports, as to quantity and quality. We 
were told long before Charlestown was annexed that 
there was an abundant supply of water there for half 
a century. Now, if I rightly read the report of the 
eminent gentlemen who have surveyed that territory, 
there is not a sufficient supply there. There is an un- 
truth somewhere. It has been more than intimated 
that the interests of Middlesex County controlled a 
portion of that report. I charge nobody, but I call 
the attention of the people to facts which history has 
given upon these very points. I hope that before we 
launch out into these extraordinary expenditures, 
the people who are our constituents will have an op- 
portunity to consider what we are to pas* upcm. 

Mr. Thacher of Ward 15—1 did not propose to say 
anything tonight on this question. It was expected 
that there would be a sufficient number of the reports 
of the Water Board here to give each memlier of the 
Council a copy to examine at his leisure, but the 
sickness of the President of the board delayed their 
getting into the hands of the printer, so that there 
were only a few copies struck off for the Board of 
Aldermen. I would, however, say in reply to the 
gentleman from Ward 5, that he has changed his tune 
since last March. When the question came up then 
he put his vote upon record to appropriate some five 
hundred thousand dollars, as I stated last No- 
vember. The city has appropriated the money, 
but has not .given the board the right to 
take the land and water. Some of the news- 
papers have, like the gentleman from Ward 
5, taken the matter up, but they have not been on 
the ground. They appear to know more about it 
than the eminent hydraulic engineers employed by 
the Water Board. I understand that one or two civil 
engineers have given an opposite opinion, but gentle- 
men must remember that there is a difierence be- 
tween civil and hydraulic engineers. I ask gentle- 
men of the Council to consider this thing well, and 
it will be time to pass judgment when they shall 
have seen the report. The whole subject of Mystic 
and Sudbury rivers has been gone over. The com- 
plaint from East Boston in regard to the impurity of 
the Mystic is three or four years olc. The Clerk of 
the Charlestown Water Board told me last summer, 
without any hesitiancy, that there was some doubt 
as to the quantity that they would be able to sipply 
to their own territory without taking any more, and 
that five million gallons were wasted daily. 



JANUARY 32 



1874 



26 



Mr. Pease of Ward 1— I think it is folly to enter 
intoauy discussion of this subject tonight. We have 
the report of the Water Board, and I trust every 
gentleman in the City Government will read it care- 
fully. I hope tlie amplest opportunity for discussion 
will be allowed. It is a matter for the people to con- 
sider. One tliins is certain, we must have water no 
matter where we get it from. What is the use of 
saying anything about the purity or impurity of 
Mystic water, when these two hydraulic engineers 
say there is n't enough. Two years ago the report of 
the Charlestown Water Board called for storage 
basins, as the' Mystic Kiver did not furnish water 
enough to supply Charlestown as fast as they were 
taking it. There is no use talking about Mystic, 
when we must go to Sudbury Kiver or Lake Winni- 
piseogee, or somewhere else to get water. I hope gen- 
tlemen will inform themselves on the subject. So 
far as I am concerned, I am ready to vote tonight, 
but I am willing to allow gentlemen timeto inform 
themselves. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7—1 desire to ask the gentle- 
man from Ward 1 if trie passage of this order will not 
involve the city in an expenditure of at least eight or 
nine million dollars. 

Mr. Pease of Ward 1— I am not in a position to 
answer positively, but I presume it will involve an 
Kxpenditure of eight or nine million dollars to supply 
sufficient water for the next twenty-five years. 

The motion to specially assign and print the report 
was carried. 

On motion of Mr. Burditt of Ward l(j— 

Ordered, That the Joint Standing Committee on 
Public Buildings be authorized to supply the neces- 
sary furniture for, and cause to be made such repairs 
and cleaning as may be needed in the several high, 
grammar and primary school houses; the expense 
therefor to be charged to the appropriation for 
Schoolhouses, Public Buildings. 

Ordered, That the Joint Standing Committee on 
Public Buildings be authorized to supply the neces- 
sary furniture and cause to be made such repairs and 
cleaning as may be needed upon the City Hall; also, 
such repairs as may be necessary on the police sta- 
tion houses and engine houses, together with other 
public buildings; the expense therefor to be charged 
to the appropriation for Public Buildings. 

Severally passed under a suspension of the rules, 
on motion of Mr. Burditt of VVard 16. 

On motion of Mr. Noyes of Ward 5, the second 
monthly report of the Board of Fire Commissioners 
was taken from the table and sent up. 

On motion of Mr. Morse of Ward 13— 

Ordered, That the City Surveyor be authorized 
with the approval of tne Joint Standing (lommittee 
on the Surveyor's Department, to make such pur- 
chases of >upplies, instruments, drawintr materials 
and furniture, and to incur such other expenses as 
may be necessary for his department, from time to 
time during the present municipal year; and also 
that said committee be authorized to furnish said 
Surveyor, by hire or purchase, a horse and vehicle, if 
they shall deem it necessary, for the use of his de 
partment. 

Read ouce. 

On motion of Mr. Martin of Ward 7 — 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be requested 
to appoint the members of the Common Council 
special police officers without pay. 

Parsed. 

BUNKER-HILL DISTRICT. 

On motion of Mr. Hicks of Ward 22— 

Ordered, That in all official proceedings and acts of 
the City Government, the territory comprised in 
Wards 20. 21 and 22 shall be he reafterknown as the 
Bunker-Hill District. 

Mr. Kent of Ward 21—1 don't know that I quite 
get the force of the order. I suppose that the legal 
name of the territory referred to is Boston, accord- 
ing to the legislative act, but I certainly am in favor 
of an expression of opinion on the part of the City 
Council of Boston in favor of designating this par- 
ticular territory as the Bnnker-Hiil District. So far 
as I have learned from my intercourse with the peo- 
ple of that district, they favor the name Bu kcr-Hill 
District rather than that of Charlestown. There are 
some who think the name Bunker Hill, like that 
of the American eagle, has been abused, but I think a 
majority favor the name Bunker-Hill District. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5— It seems to me as if that or 
der, to be rightly interpreted, should have an amend- 
ment to it. I will suggest that it be amended so that 
it will read "in all matters referring to that district." 

Mr. West of Ward 16— Before that order passes I 
should like to know why the name should be 
changed to Bunker-Hill District, and that of Charles- 
town obliterated? I should object to losing the name 
of Charlestown. Bunker Hill can take care of itself. 



Until I hear a good reason for the change I shall op- 
pose the passage of the order. 

Mr. Kent of Ward 21—1 suppose the reasons are 
entirely local in their character. I have tried to give, 
to the I'jest of my ability, the sentiment of the peo- 
ple as I understand it. I think the people of that 
territory in question would prefer the name of Bun- 
ker-Hill District to that of Charlestown, for local 
reasons which every gentleman here can easily com- 
prehend. 

Mr. Perkins of Ward 16—1 should like to asK of 
the legal gentlemen present whether it can be called 
the Bunker-Hill District. If it is to gratify local 
pride, and there is no legal obstacle, I can't see any 
objection to it. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7—1 can only say that when 
Roxbury was annexed the name of the Southern 
District Municipal Court was retained, and an order 
was passed designating that territory as Boston High- 
lands. 

Mr. Dacey of Ward 20 — The gentleman from Ward 
21 live« in one section of the district referred to, and 
I am in another. But I think the people there would 
not have had a delegation in this Council had they 
not thought it would have been called the Bunker- 
Hill District. 

Mr. Powers of Ward 4—1 hope the order will pass. 
I think it very proper that the territory should be 
termed the Bunker-Hill District. Bunker Hill is 
something that we all should know something about. 
There is but one Bunker Hill in the country, hut I 
believe we have a Charlestown in about every State 
in the Union. 1 know something of the sentiment 
of the people there, and I have yet to find a person 
living there who wishes to have it called Charlestown. 
Most of them have had Charlestown Jon ^ enough, 
but none are tired of BuuKer Hill. 

Mr. Brackott of Ward 10 — I would inquire whether 
there was any official action similar to this proposed 
when Roxbury was annexed? It is questionable 
whether it is competent for this body to pass an or- 
der giving u name to any particular three wards of 
the city— whether we ought to give a name to that 
district any more than to Wards 9, 10 and 1:3. My 
question is, whether there is any precedent for giv- 
ing a name to any number of wards. 

Mr. Morse of Ward 1:3 — For the information of the 

fentleman from VVard 10, I will state that when Rox- 
ury was annexed, there was a vote passed the Coun- 
cil that it should be called Boston Highlands. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5-1 move to amend the order 
by inserting after the word "government" the words 
"specially applying to," and after the word "twenty- 
two," the word "it." It seems to me that if the 
order is amended, it will be about right. Having 
taken Charlestown and Bunker Hill, we should be 
entitled to the honor and glory of that grand old 
name. It is the Bunker-Hill District of Bo-ton, ard 
I perfectly agree with the L'entlemen from Charles- 
town who favor the adoption of that name. I don't 
see how any man with a patriotic heart can ri^e here 
and object to giving the name of Bunker Hill to that 
district. The glory and honor should como with the 
burden, if burden it may be. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 20— So far as I know the senti- 
ment of the people of Charlestown, they want it to 
be called Bunker Hill. After hearing the speech of 
my friend from Ward o it makes one feel like sing- 
ing "The Sword of Bunker Hill," and we might ad- 
journ for that purpose. But we will postpone that 
till a year from the seventeenth of next June, which 
will be the centennial anniversary of the battle of 
Bunker Hill, when I hope to see the members of the 
past, the present, and the next City Council of Bos- 
ton, and two hundred thousand more, on Bunker 
Hill, When we will all unite in singing "The Sword 
of Bunker Hill." I hope the order will pass, and 
that the people of the whole city will unite in cele- 
brating the centennial anniversary of Bunker Hill. 

Mr. Long of Ward 22 — I desire to say just one word 
in relation to this matter. It is a well-known fact 
that there was a large number of people in the city of 
Charlestown who did not desire to be annexed to the 
city of Boston. I, sir, in a small way, was one of 
those. I was satisfied to remain in the city 
of Charlestown and to retain its name. 
Those gentlemen from that district who have 
spoken were all members of the so-called an- 
nexation party, I think, and they have undoubtedly 
expressed the views of very many of the citizens 
there. For myself, personally, as a member of the 
Council, I am also in favor of the name of Bunker- 
Hill District, and of adopting that name. But many 
of those who were known as anti-annexationists still 
adhere to the name of Charlestown, and still desire 
to retain it. Simply that I may be placed clear upon 
the record, and that those who have worked with me, 
and I with them, against annexation, may not ask 
me why I did not raise an objection against the order. 



27 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



is the ouly reason I ask the indulgence of the Coun- 
cil for a niomunt. PerBonally I am in favor of the 
name Bunker-Hill Dictrict, but there is a respectable 
minority there who still adhere to the name Charles- 
town. I have cleared my skirts, and the citizens 
cannot say that I did not put in a word for them. 

Mr. West of Ward 16—1 did not know that I was 
going to stir up such a breeze. I do not object to 
the name Bunker Hill; you cannot take that away 
from us. The objection I have is that we shall lose 
the name of Charlestown. It is a good old name. I 
prefer the names Charlestown, Roxbury and Brigh- 
ton. We ought to preserve those good old names. 
Bunker Hill will take care of itself without any sug- 
gestions of patriotism here. I do not know what 
reason they have for wanting to lose the name of 
Charlestown. If I lived there I should want to pre- 
serve the name of Charlestown, and have both that 
and Bunker Hill. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 20— Charlestown has been 
courting for some time and got married last fall, and 
I think she wants^to change her name. She has a 
great many children; she has had several towns set 
off from her original territory, and we propose to 
change the name. Now in regard to the members of 
this branch from that district— not one of them was 
born there, but we have all lived there many years 
and we have all gathered as near Bunker Hill as pos- 
sible. Charlestown has been absorbed into Boston, 
and I am fully convinced that a great majority of the 
people there wish to have the name changed. ' 

The amendment of Mr. Shaw was accepted by Mr. 
Hicks. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 6—1 would suggest that the 
amendment of the gentleman from Ward 5 leaves the 
order worse than it was originally. It limits the order 
to "matters specially relating to that district." I 
think it should relate to all matters in general in 
which that district is mentioned. I move to amend 
by striking out the amendment, so that the order will 
stand as it was originally. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5—1 ask permission to say a few 
words if the President will allow mc. 

The President — The Chair cannot allow the gentle- 
man to speak. He must receive the unanimous con- 
sent of the Council. 

Unanimous permission was given to Mr. Shaw to 
speak. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5—1 shall always give way to 
my legal friend from Ward 6, because he is the'rep- 
resentative of the gentleman who was here before 
him from that ward. But I shall nevertheless defend 
the amendment. I want to confine the order where 
it is intended by the mover— to Wards 20, 21 and 22. 
The amendment makes it distinct and clear, notwith- 
standing the legal acumen of my friend. It puts the 
order in the right shape, and without the amend- 
ment it does n't properly apply and can't be proper- 
ly interpreted. But as it now reads it certainly 
applies to that district and none other. I hope the 
order will pass as amended. 

Mr. Crocker— The order now reads "That in all 
official proceedings and acts of the City Government 
specially applying to the territory comprised in 
Wards 20, 21 and 22, it shall be hereafter known as 
the Bunker-Hill District." My objection is that in 
acts not specially applying to those wards, — and there 
are many acts of course that apply not specially to 
those wards, but to the whole city.— the order would 
not require the territory to be so called. I move that 
the order be amended by restoring it to the original 
language. 

The motion was lost by a rising vote — 22 for, 23 
against. 

Mr. Burditt of Ward 16— It seems to me that we are 
liable to make some mistake, and I move that the 
order lie upon the table. 
The motion was carried. 
On motion of Mr. Powers of Ward 4 — 
Ordered, That the Committee on Public Buildings 
be authorized to place proper fences or guards on the 
roofs of the City Hall and Court House so as to pre- 
vent the falling of snow and ice therefrom: the ex- 
pense to be charged to the appropriation fix- Public 
Buildings. 
Bead once. 

THE GARDEN DI.STRICT. 

On motion of Mr. West of Ward 16— 

Ordered, That the territory now known as Ward 19 
of Boston, in all oflicial acts relating to that district, 
be designated as the Garden District. 

Mr. West of Ward 16— Although I have offered that 
order. I shall not advocate its passage. I believe in 
the name of Brighton as I do in Charlestown, but if 



we are going to have a new deal let us have one all 
round. I hope somebody will advocate the passage 
of the order. 

Mr. Denny of Warp 9— As legal points in naming 
the Charlestown district Bunker Hill were raised, and 
as by the new rules we have a Committee on the Ju- 
diciary to whom all legal questions are to be referred, 
I move that this order be referred to the Committee 
on the Judiciary 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5—1 do not object to the refer- 
ence, but I only want to suggest that there is no legal 
force in either of these orders. Whatever we m"ay 
say or pass here with regard to the Bunker-Hill or 
Brighton districts will have no legal force. Now, let 
my friend from Ward 6 bring his legal acumen to 
bear upon that. We cannot make a law nor 
can we pass any act which, in itself, shall 
apply to that district as a district. Such a 
thing never has been done here. I don't object to 
the reference, but. I will say to my worthy friends 
here that they may change the name — they may 
knock it about as they please, but as Tom Moore 
says— 

"You may break, you may shatter the vase If you will. 
But the scent of the roses will hang round it still." 

Mr. Perkins of Ward 16—1 move an amendment so 
that it shall be called the "Vegetable Garden Dis- 
trict." 

The President— The gentleman's amendment is not 
in order at this time, The questioa is on the motion 
to refer, which takes precedence. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7— It appears to me that this- 
oraer is not offered in good faith, and I therefore 
move that it be indefinitely postponed. 

Mr. West of Ward 16 — I acted in good faith. I was 
requested to offer the order. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7— Then I move that the order 
lie upon the table. 

Mr. Denny of Ward 9—1 shall advocate the motion 
of the gentleman from Ward 7, and therefore with- 
draw the motion to refer to the Committee on the 
Judiciary. 

The motion to lay on the table was carried. 

SUFFOLK-STREET DISTRICT. 

On motion of Mr. Noyes of Ward 5— 

Ordered, That the Joint Special Committee on the 
Northampton street District, be authorized to exer- 
cise all the powers in relation to the Suffolk-street 
District, which were conferred on the committee of 
the Cit} Council on said district for the year 1873. 

Mr. Noyes of Ward 5 moved a suspension of the 
rules that the order might pass. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 hoped the gentleman would 
give some reason for a suspension of the rules. 

Mr. Noyes of Ward 5 — The only reason is that 
there is some unfinished business to come before the 
committee— there are two or three claims to be closed 
up — and by putting the order through tonight those 
claims can be acted upon l>y tne committee at the 
next meeting; otherwise the business may have to 
He over three or four weeks. 

Mr. Crowley of Ward 7 inquired what were the 
powers referred to in the order. 

A vote was taken on the question of suspending of 
the rules, but a quorum not voting, the President 
called attention to the rule requiring all members 
present to vote 

Mr. Noyes — If there is any objection I will with- 
draw the motion to suspend the rules. 

The President rub'd that the motion could not be 
withdrawn after a vote had been taken. 

The Council refused to suspend the rules by a ris- 
ing vote— 1 for, 56 against. 

FIRE commissioners' REPORTS. 

Mr. Thacher of Ward 15 moved that the first report 
of the Fire Commissioners be taken from file and or- 
dered to be printed. A great many people had been 
asking what the commissioners have been doing, and 
the public wanted to see the report. 

Mr. Denny of Ward 9— The report is a simple rec- 
ord of the fires of the previous month. It contains 
no recommendation, and I can see no necessity for 
printing it. It contains nothing of public interest, 
and is not worth printing. 

Mr. Thachei- c Ward 15 — My object was to have 
the report brought out so that people could see it. 
There have been many inquiries in regard to the re- 
ports of the Fire Commissioners; this is said to be 
the second report, and people desire to see the first 
one. 

The motion to take the report from the files was 
lost by a rising vote, 5 for, 41 against. 

On motion of Mr. Flynn of Ward 7, the Council ad- 
journed. 



BOAE.D OF ALDERMEN. 



28 



CITY OF BO STON. 

Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

JANUARY 38, 1874. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Akler- 
men was held at rour o'clock P. M. today, Alderman 
Clark, Chairman, presiding. 

EXECUTIVE NOMINATIONS CONFIRMED. 

Special Police— Daniel W. Tyler, Temporary Home 
Chardon street; B. C. Hazelton, Lurliue Hall and its 
vicinity; George W. Wheeler, Tremont Temple and 
its vicinity ; Kichard Purdy, Campbell & Brooks's ship- 
yard, East Boston; Patrick C. Ky an, 52 High street 
and vicinity. 

Weighers of Coal — William T. Gardner, George B. 
Lewis. 

Undertaker — Samuel A. Anger. 

A communication was received from the Mayor 
appointing niumhers of the Common Council special 
police without pay. 

The appointments were severally confirmed. 

HARBOR ASSESSMENTS. 

A communication was received from His Honor the 
Mayor, transmitting, as part of the unfinished busi- 
ness of the city of Charlestown, the papers relating to 
an assessment made upon that citv by the Harbor 
Commissioners of the Commonwealth on account of 
tide water displaced by the filling of flats in Prison 
Point Bay. Referred to the Joint Committee on Har- 
bors. 

PETITIONS REFERRED. 

To the Committee on Pacing. Anne R. Ripley, to be 
relieved from the surface water which flows on her 
estate on Harvard street. Ward 10. 

To the Committee on Health on tlie Part of the Board. 
James A. Lappen et al., remonstrance against erec- 
tion of stable in rear of 190 H street. 

Albert Batchelder et al.., remonstrance against erec- 
tion of stable by Mr. Howe at 787 Shawmut avenue. 

C. Menslage, to occupy wooden stable for one 
horse on Second street, corner Of B street. 

S. S. Riddell, to occupy wooden stable for four 
horses on the corner of Elm street and Roanoke ave- 
nue, Jamaica Plain. 

William H. Bennett, to occupy wooden stable for 
one horse on Shawmut avenue, rear of 787. 

Joshua Benson, to occupy a wooden stable for ten 
horses on Ward street, rear of No. 15. 

Hiram Johnson, to occupy wooden stable for two 
horses on Vernon street, between Washington street 
and Shawmut avenue. 

Michael F. Green, to occupy wooden stable for two • 
horses on Walden place. 

John Thomas, to occupy wooden stable for two 
horses on Eustis street. No. 235. 

To tfie Cmmnittee on Police. Harding, Gray & Dewey 
^/ a/., to be heard on thfa order for removal of pro- 
jecting signs. 

To the Committee on Public Buildings. Board of 
Health, request for additional oftice roora. 

To the Committee on Lamps. Joseph W. Bartlett, 
that the city use his method for lighting street lamps. 

To tlie Committee on Public Lands. Trustees of 
Boston College, for modification of conditions of sale 
of their estate. 

7'o the Committee on Cemeteries. Patrick Tracey 
et. al., for leave to establish a cemetery in Ward 17. 

To the Committee on Licenses. Joseph A. Willis et 
al., remonstrance against the exhibitions held by 
Mrs. Stoddard and her son on Sunday evenings, 
without a license. 

7'o the Committee on Sevmrs. John M. Way, for 
abatement of assessment for sewer in Copeland street. 

To the Committee on Claims. James A. Kemp, to be 
paid for damages caused by non-fulfilment of a con- 
tract. 

To the Joint Committee on Streets. Joseph Gahm, 
that the line of Main street, Charlestown, may be 
defined. 

Old Colony Railroad, lessees of Union Freight 
Railroad, ana William B. Stearns, president Fitch- 
burg Railroad, that the City Government will peti- 
tion the Legislature to make equitable charges for 
facilities that railroads may receive in case Atlantic 
avenue should be widened for mercantile purposes, 
according to the petition of A. H. Rice and others, 
now pending before the Street Commissioners. 

Joshua Stone et al., that the City Government will 
petition the Legislature for power to make equitable 
charges for wagon stands on Atlantic avenue, in case 
it should be widened for market purposes, according 
to the petition of C. H. Adams and other dealers in 
provisions in and around Faneuil Hall and Quiucy 
markets, now pending before the Street Commission- 
ers. 

REPORTS OF CITY OFFICERS ' 

were submitted as follows: 

Commissioners of the Sinking Funds. The Board 
of Commissioners on the Sinking Funds for the re- 



demption of the debt of the city of Boston pre- 
sented their sixth semi-annual report (City Document 
No. 15), for the six months ending December 31, 1873. 
The gross funded debt, December 3i, 18(3, 

was $35,486.39.-> 71 

The gross txxnded debt, June 30, 1873, was.. 30,543.610 8(1 

Increase of the gross funded debt during the 

six months ending December 31, 1873 $4,94 2.778 91 

The total amount of redemption funds, De- 
cember 31, 1873, was $13,213,494 17 

The total amount of the redemption funds, 

June 30, 1873, was 12,710,304 18 



Increase of the redemption funds during 
the six monihs ending December 31, 1873. 
was $503,189 99 



JVe< debt December 31,1873 $22,272,901 .54 

A'et debt June 30,1873 17,833,312 62 



Increase of the net debt during the six 

months ending December 31, 1873 $4,439,588 92 



The amount of debt redeemed at maturity 
and cancelled with revenue funds, dur- 
ing the six months $210,397 74 



The various funds are shown in the following state- 
ment: 

General Debt. SinKing Fund $10,438,2.55 06 

Water Debt. Sinking Fund 1,302,934 07 

Consolidated Street Improvement Loan. 

Sinking Fund 525.279 63 

English High and Latin Schoolhouse Lot. 

Sinking Fund 17,262 60 

Columbus avenue. Sinking Fund 10,124 90 

" " Kevenue Fund 50135 

Anpropriation and Kevenue Fund, 1871-72. 147,825 29 

1872-73. 249,475 47 

Suffolk Street District, Sinking Fund 120.a55 61 

Kevenue Fund .... I,7a0 85 

Kingston Street Widening, Sinking Fund. . 20.519 31 

Kevenue Fund. 6,461 80 

Scollay's Building, Sinking Fund 13,228 57 

" " Revenue Fund 1,193-16 

Shawmut Avenue Extension, Sinking Fund 21,387 17 

Revenue Fund 13,970 61 

Congress Street "Widening, Sinking Fund. . 1,454 22 

" " " Revenue Fund. 406 66 - 

Harrison Avenue Extension, Sinking Fund 21,125 95 

•' " " Revenue Fund 1.295 96 

Grammar Schoolhouse, L street. Sinking 

Fund 5.547 55 

Widening and Grading Dudlev and other 

streets. Sinking Fund 10,422 04 

Widening and Grading Dudley and other 

streets, Kevenue Fund 6,195 21 

Federal Street Bridge Widening, Sinking 

Fund 5,405 19 

Back Bay Bridges, Sinking Fund. . . 5,884 15 

Kneeland Street Widening, Sinking Fund. . 4,621 65 

Revenue Fund. 2,442 44 

Devonshire Street Extension, Sinking Fund 15,025 :w 

" " Revenue Fund 92 50 

South Market Street Extension, Sinking 

Fund 8,613 (W 

South Market Street Extension, Kevenue 

Fund 1 .889 84 

Appleton Street Extension, Sinking Fund. 3,US3 73 

Warren Street Widening, Sinking F'und 3,.542 73 

" " Kevenue Fund. . 89 5« 
Additional land. Public Library, Sinking 

Fund 4,315 65 

Grammar Schoolhouse, Atherton District, 

Sinking Fund 3,000 00 

Smallpox Hospital, Sinking Fund 6,000 00 

Grammar Schoolhouse, Dudley District, 

Sinking Fund 5,!i47 55 

Mather Schoolhouse, Ward 16, Sinking 

Fund 4,111 65 

Washington Street Extension, Sinking 

Fund 46,256 05 

Burnt District, Sterling Loan, Sinking 

Fund 154,226 27 

Burnt District, Sterling Loan, Kevenue 

Fund 2,063 .55 



7 he Debt. 



$13,213,494 17 



Total Funded Debt, June 30, 1873 $.30,543,616 Sti 

Increase since i 5,153,176 65 



Paid from General Debt Sinking 

Fund $105,500 00 

Paid from Con. St. Imp. Fund . . . 40,897 74 
Paid from Revenue Funds 64,000 Ot) 



$35,696,793 45 



210,.397 74 



Gro.ts Funded Debt, Dec. 31, 1873 $;i5,486.395 71 

Less Redemption Funds 13,213,494 17 

Net Debt, Dec. 31, 1873 $22,272,901 54 



Respectfully submitted, 

Samuel C. Cobb, 
F. U. Tracy, 
Alfred T. Turner, 
John T. Clark, 
William H. West, 
Newton Talbot, 
John O. Poor, 



Commissioners 

on the - 
Sinking Funds. 



29 



BOAl^D OF AX^DKRMEN 



The report was accepted and Bent np. 

Comrnisxioner of Cliaiies-Jliver and Warren Bi-idgex. 
Siiici; the last annual report the reconstruction and 
the extensive repairs on Warren Bridge have been 
completed, and with the exception of a small ex- 
pense occasioned by an accident to the draw pier, no 
expenditure has been required upon this bridge wor- 
thy of notice. It is now in a very good condition 
except that portion between the draw and the abut- 
ment on the Boston side. The piling part of the 
bridge is too slight, and requires some truss-work in 
the wide bay near the Fitchburg Kailroad Depot, 
with some new girders strengthened by bolts. The 
great amount of travel over this bridge renders it 
necessary that all parts should be substantial and 
firm. The draw and all its appurtenances are in ex- 
cellent working order. The result of the applica- 
tion of steam to open the draw and assist vessels in 
passing through, fully sustains the anticipations of 
the commissioner in his last annual report. No ac- 
cident has occurred in connection with it, and its op- 
eration has proved entirely satisfactory. By an ar- 
rangement with Messrs. Johnson & Young, the 
lesees of the lobster house on the drawbridge, all the 
steam for the engine is supplied from their boiler.and 
as the superintendent of the bridge acts as the en- 
gineer, the expense of steam as compared with horse- 
power is onl.y about two-thirds. The engine is of 
eight-horse power, and has a boiler which can be Ui^ed 
if necessary, but during the past year there has been 
no call for its use. The draw was opened 7024 times 
during the year for the passage of vessels through, 
or 700 less than the previous year. In consequence 
of the extraordinary expenditures on Warren Bridge 
in 1872, the commissioner did not deem it advisable 
to make the extensive repairs required on Charles- 
River Bridge dur'ng 1873, and therefore did nor ask 
for any appropriation for this purpose. It will be 
necessary, however, during the present year to put 
Charles-River Bridge In thorough order. The Dulk- 
heads are badly decayed, and with the fence require 
entire renewal. The lumber for the fence is on hand. 
The roadway is in a very bad condition, and the 
present cobble-stone pavement ought to be supersed- 
ed by granite blocks, which have been used on War- 
ren Bridge with good results. The sidewalks also 
need to be repaved, the edgestones reset and the gas 
pipes renewed. The west pier requires new capping, 
flooring, plank and other repairs. The machinery of 
the draw will also require some repairs, although by 
care and good management it has been in 
good working order during the past year. 
No accident has occurred to caus-; any de- 
lay to either the travel or navigation. The 
draw of this bridge was opened 9360 times during the 
past year, or 904 less than the previous year. This 
decrease in the number of vessels passing through 
the draws of these bridges is due partly to the large 
amount of heavy freight landed during the past year 
for the Lowell Railroad Company at their wharf on 
the Mystic River, near the Chelsea Bridge inttead of 
being landed, as formerly, at their wharves above the 
bridges, and partly from the introduction of coal 
vessels of larger capacity than formerly. There has 
also been quite a falling oil in the number of lumber- 
laden vessels and other smaller craft passing up the 
river during the past season, as compared with pre- 
vious years. The amount appropriated for the finan- 
cial year for these bridsres was $7000; amount ex- 
pended, $4033 83; balance, $2966 17. 

The report was laid upon the table and ordered to. 
be printed. 

JAIL EXPENSES. 

A requisition for $1767 4.5 was received from the 
sheriff of Suffolk County for expenses of the County 
Jail for the month of January, which, being approv- 
ed by the Auditor of Accounts, was ordered paid. 

BONDS APPROVED. 

The bonds of Abraham M. Leavitt, Isaac Jacobs, 
Nicholas G. Lynch, constables, being presented duly 
certified, were approved by the Board. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Preamble and order to pay the following persons 
for land taken to lay out a highway in the town of 
Revere, by Middlesex Commissioners, January 2, 
1872: J. II. Ricker, $100, William O. Hall, $100, tim- 
othy Wilson; $2,5. Passed. 

Order to pay the heirs of J. H. Pearson $18,1.57, for 
Broad street damages. Passed. 

Order to pay the heirs of Zabdiel B. Adams 
$3063 75, for Pearl-street damages. Passed. 

PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Petitions of Charles Burrill, Boston Gas Light 
Company, and Company A, First Battalion. Sever- 
ally referred in concurrence. 

Requests from the School Committee that a room 
be provided in the High Schoolhouse, Bedford street, 
for models and for instruction in drawing; also that 
a room be provided in the Girls' High Schoolhouse 
for instruction in drawing. Referred to the Com- 
mittee on Public Instruction. 



Report of Fire Commissioners for December, 1873. 
Placed on tile. 

Order to provide furniture, repairs and cleaning 
for High, Grammar and Primary schoolhouses dur- 
ing this municipal year. 

Passed. 

Order to provide farniture, repairs and cleaniDg 
for the City Hall, the engine houses and police sta- 
tions during this year. 

Passed. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman Cutter, from the Committee on Police, 
to whom were referred the nominations of Oliver 
Ayers, Benjamin William8,William H. Brown, Orison 
Little, Henry Fore and Joseph B. Colton as police of 
fleers of the city, submitted a report recommending 
that the same be confirmed. Reported accepted and 
nominations confirmed. 

Alderman Cutter, from the Committee on Paving, 
reported leave to withdraw on petition of Matilda A. 
Dawson to be paid for grade damages on Alpine 
street. Accepted. 

Alderman Cutter, from the Committee on Pavine. 
to whom were referred various petitions, submitted 
reports recommending the passage of the following 
orders: 

Whereas, By an order passed by the Board of Al- 
dermen, Nov. 10, 1873, Daniel Goodnow was diiected 
to remove the bay window eiected contrary to law in 
front of his estate on West Brookline street; and. 
whereas, said Goodnow has neglected to remove said 
bay window, it is hereby 

Ordered, That the Chief of Police be and he i.a 
hereby directed to prosecute Daniel Goodnow for 
maintaining a bay window extending over the line 
of the street m front of his estate on West Brookline 
street, near Tremont street, after due notice from the 
Board of Aldermen to remove the same. 

Passed. 

Ordered, That the Board establish the grade of Al- 
ban street, between Welles avenue and Ashmout 
street. Ward 16, as shown on a plan and profile drawn 
by the City Surveyor, dated August 11, 1873, and de- 
posited in the office of said City Surveyor. 

Passed. 

Ordered, That the Board establish the grade of 
Argyle street between Dorchester and Welles avenues. 
Ward 16, as shown on a plan and profile drawn by the 
City Surveyor, dated August 11, 1873, and deposited 
in the office of said City Surveyor. 

Passed. 

Ordered, That the Board establish the grade of 
Welles avenue between Washington and Argyle 
streets. Ward 16, as shown on a plan and profile 
drawn by the City Surveyor, dated Feb. 1, 1872, and 
deposited in the office of said City Surveyor. 

Passed. 

Ordered, That licenses be granted upon the usual 
condition to the following-named parlies to maintain 
and use hoisting beams over the sidewalks In the 
locations herein named : Adams Express Com- 
pany, Village and Lucas streets; J. H. Ayers, Shaw- 
mut avenue; W. F. Badger, 61 and 63 Wareham 
street; M. Burr, 186 Endicott street; Boston & Al- 
bany Railroad Company, Lehigh street; Boston & 
Albany Railroad Company, Broadway Extension; 
Brown & Cahoon, 75 North Market street; James 
Brown, 37 North Market street; Bryant & Company, 
30 Clinton street; Frank Campbell, A street, near 
Second street; Cowen & Chessman, 205 Commercial 
street; Uriel Crocker, Chardon street; John C. Dal- 
ton, Jr., Fruit street; Denny, Rice & Company, 14 
Hamilton street; Daniel Doherty, 101 and 103 Bever- 
ly street; Barney Doherty & Son. 34 Medford street; 
Douglass & Graves, 73 East Dedham street; Moses" 
Fairt)anks & Company, 12 North Anderson street; 
Fenno, Son & Company, 235 Broad street; J. F.Gault 
& Company, 43 Way street, Gilman & Company, 14 
Fruit street; Edward Glennau, 890 Harrison avenue; 
Garrison & Rodliff, 36 India street; J. T. & N. Glines, 
2 Hay market square; Gouland, Smith & Company. 
220 Friend street; Harding, Gray & Dewey, Congress 
street, comer Channing; Alfred A. Hall, 18 and 20 
Pie imont street; Hamlin & McBride. 26 Purchase 
street; Hayden, Guardenier & Company, Well street; 
Highland Street Railway Company, Blue Hill avenue; 
Highland Street Railway Company, Shawmut ave- 
nue; James R. Hicks, 59 Beverly street; Hill & 
Wright, Sumner and Jeffries streets. East Boston; 
Hilton, Weston & Co., 101 Broad street; A. C. Hop- 
kins & Co., 21 and 23 Wareham street; Jennings & 
Noyes, 138 Beach street; Daniel Kelly, 12 Hawkins 
street; Knowles & Leland, 140 Harrison avenue; 
Horace Manning, 22 Palmer street; Charles R. Mc- 
Lean, 100 Lewis street. East Boston; Morse, Denny 
& Co., 18 Custom House street; George H. Moseley, 
Brookline, corner Albany street; J. A. Murray, 9 
, Irving street; J. W. Neal, Third, between A and B 
streets; Nichols, Parker & Dupee, 85 Broad street; 
Prond Brothers. 137 Border street; Purcell & Fowle, 
Everett street, East Boston; Sheppard Robbins, 306 
Tremont street; John Rice, 77 Sudbury street; Rich- 



JANUARY as, 187-^ 



30 



ardson & Young, 23 and 25 Beverly street; J. S. Sar- 
gent, Paul street; Levi W. Shaw, 43 and 45 Way 
i-treet; W. W. Smith, 196 Portland street; Howard 
Suelling & Co., Albany, opposite Canton street; 
Soule & Gould, 36 India street; A. Towle & Co., 363 
Charles street; Vincent, Hathaway & Co., 66 East 
Canton street ; Wiggin & Robinson, 391 Commercial 
street. 

Passpd. 

Alderman Bigelow presented the following: 

The Coiumitlee on Common and Public Grounds 
beg leave to represent that the removal of the side- 
walk on the westerly side of Tremont street, adjoin- 
ing the Common, makes it necessary for the public 
convenience that a temporary plank walk should be 
provided on the mall between Park street and Boyl- 
ston street. The present appropriation for this de- 
partment would be insufficient to cover the expense 
of providing such a walk in addition to the ordinary 
expenses which will be increased during the remain- 
der of the linaucial year, and if the work is per- 
formed it will be necessary to make a special appro- 
priation fer the purpose. It appears from proposals 
which have been received that the cost of putting 
down two walks, each four planks wide, for a dis- 
tance of fifteen hundred feet will amount to seven 
hundred and ^ixt.y dollars; and the committee would 
respectfully request an appropriation of that sum. 
For the Committee. 

John T. Clark, 

Chairman. 

The request was referred to the Committee on 
FiLaiice. 

Alderman Bigelow submitted reports from the 
Committee on Licenees in favor of granting the ap- 
plications of Charles J. McCarty, for transfer of hack 
license; Harris & Levy, for junk dealer's license at 
37 Church street; Scaunell <fe Ehlers, to deal in sec- 
ond-hand articles at 297 Commercial street; C M. 
Charter, to exhibit a panorama at Monument Hall, 
Chariestown, January 27-29; A. W. Baker, to keep 
i)illiard saloon at 5 Bow street, Chariestown; George 
W. Colbath, to keep billiard saloon at 449 Bunker 
Hill street; James Walker, to keep billiard saloon at 
National House, Chariestown; R. Aylward et al., for 
transfer of wagon licenses; H. L. White, for wagon 
stand on Indiana place and Shawmut avenue; John 
T. Harrington, to give musical exhibition at Matta- 
pan Hall, South Boston, February 17; Theodore 
Thomas, for leave to give concerts at Music Hall, 
January 29-31 ; Charles Morton, 143 Atlantic avenue, 
for victualler's license; George A. Ayer, 2 Bowdoiu 
square, for innholder's license. Severally accepted. 

Alderman Emery presented the following: 

The Committee on Public Lands, in whose charge 
has been placed the property belonging to the city, 
known as the "Swett-street Hospital lot and wharf,' ' 
respectfully represent that in their judgment to prop- 
erly Improve said property and make it available, 
either for sale or to lease, for wharf or other purposes, 
it is desirable that Swett street be laid out at once as 
a public way from Albany street and extended to 
Dorchester street. 

For the Committee. Hieam Emert, 

Chairman. 

Referred to Board of Street Commissioners. 

Alderman Emery, from the Committee on Public 
Lands, to whom was referred the petition of Thomas 
W. Carter, reported the following orders: 

Ordered, That the Treasurer be and hereby is au- 
thorized to cancel the lease of Thomas W. Carter, 
upon his paying the amount due the city January 1, 
1874. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Lands be 
directed to lease the lot of land on Albany street op- 
posite the City Hospital, and containing 37,027 square 
feet, together with the buildings thereon standing, 
to Thomas W. Carter, for a term of eight years from 
January 1, 1874, and at the rate of three thousand 
two hundred and fifty dollars per annum, payable 
quarterly. It being understood that the city reserves 
the right to cancel said lease at any time after the ex- 
piration of six years, by giving one year's notice 
thereof, and that permission be given said Carter to 
enlarge and extend the building'which was partially 
destroyed by fire, upon condition that the value of 
said building, when completea, shall not be less than 
3ve thousand dollars, and that he keeps the same in- 
sured in the sum of two thousand dollars, payable in 
case of loss to the city of Bosion, and at such office 
as shall meet the approval of the Superintendent of 
Public Lands. 

Read once. 

On motion of Alderman Hall- 
Ordered, That the Superintendent of Lamps be 
and he is hereby authorized, under the approval of 
the Committee on Lamps, to contract with the Ja- 
maica Plain Gas Light Company for gas for lighting 
the streets in that section of the city upon the same 
conditions as the contracts now existing with other 
companies, the price not to exceed two dollars and 
seventy-five cents per thousand cubic feet. 



Read once. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Lamps be 
and he is hereby authorized, under the aporoval of 
the Committee on Lamps, during the municipal year 
1874, to contract for and purchase the lamp posts, 
brackets, burners, tips, cocks, lanterns and such 
other articles as shall be found necessary for the car- 
rying on of the Lamp Department; the cost thereof 
to be charged to the appropriation for Lamps. 

Passed. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Lamps he 
and he is hereby authorized, under the approval of 
the Committee on Lamps, to contract with the 
Chariestown Gas Company for gas for lighting the 
streatsln that section of the city upon the s»me con- 
ditions as the contract now existing with other com- 
panies; the price not to exceed $3 50 per thousand 
cubic feet. 

Passed. 

On motion of Alderman Emery — 

Ordered, That the Committee on County Buildings 
be and they are hereby authorized to cause such re- 
pairs and alterations to be made as may be needed 
on the Court House and Probate Building, also to the 
Municipal Court rooms at the Highlands and in the 
Dorchester District, provided such repairs and al- 
terations shall not ex -eed the sum of five thousand 
dollars during the municipal year; the expense there- 
for to be charged to the appropriation for the County 
of Suffolk. 

Ordered, That the Committee on County Buildings 
be authorized to provide the necessary furniture for 
the Court House and Probate Building; also for the 
Municipal Court rooms in the Highlands and in the 
Dorchester District; the expense therefore to be 
charged to the appropriation for the County of Suf- 
folk. 

Ordered, That the Committee on County Build 
ings be and they are hereby anthorized to provide 
the necessary snow guards for the roof of the Court 
House, the expense therefor to be charged to the ap- 
propriation for the County of Suffolk. 

Ordered, That the Committee on County Buildings 
be authorized to cause such repairs and alterations 
to be made as may be required upon the county jail 
daring the municipal year, provided such repairs and 
alterations shall not exceed the sum of five thousand 
dollars, the expense therefor to be charged to the 
appropriation for the County of Suffolk. 

Severally passed. 

Alderman Emery, from the Committee on Faneuil 
Hall, who were requested to report new rules and 
regulations for the government or said hall, reported 
the subjoined rules for adoption. The committee 
think that the use of Faneuil Hall for balls and fairs 
should be discontinuea by the Board except for very 
peculiar or extraordinary occasions, as such use is 
manifestly foreign to the purpose for which the hall 
was granted to the city. 

1. Whenever the hall shall be used for the hold- 
ing of any meeting, on a petition signed by fifty legal 
voters, there shall be paid to the superintendent of the 
hall, the following prices in advance: For opening and . 
closing the hall a day, for a convention or for politi- 
cal meetings, twenty dollars; for opening and closing 
the hall in the evening, for politi<;al or othor meet- 
ings, including lighting and warming, twenty-five 
dollars; for a dinner by day cr in the evening, fifty 
dollars. 

2. No decorations shall be made in said hall, with- 
out a special order from the Board of Aldermen. 

3. The police attending any meeting in said hall 
shall be detailed from those aopointed by the Board 
of Aldermen, and the expense of the same shall be 
defrayed by the applicants. 

4. The applicants shall be answerable, jointly and 
severally, for all damages done to the hall in the occu- 
pation of the same. 

5. Where decorations of any kind are used the 
same shall be put up without the use of nails or 
screws. 

6. The superintendent shall pay, quarterly, to the 
City Treasurer, a'l moneys received by him for the 
use of the hall, first deducting therefrom the amounts 
expended by him for cleaning, gas, etc., for which 
vouchers shall be exhibited. 

The report was accepted and the rules and regula- 
tions adopted. 
On motion of Alderman Brooks — 
Ordered, That the Committee on Ordinances con- 
sider the expediency of giving the Joint Standing 
Committee on the Survey and Inspection of Build- 
iugs full power to decide upon all questions referred 
to it by the City Council, concerning the erection of 
wooden buildings in the city of Boston. 
Passed. 

On motion of Alderman Cutter- 
Ordered, That the Chief-of-Police, under the direc- 
tion of the Committee on Police, be authorized to 
purchase such supplies and furniture as may be re- 
quired; also to make the necessary repairs on furni- 
ture and heating apparatus during the present year; 



31 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



the expense to be charged to the appropriation for 
Police. 

Passed. 

Alderman WorHiington, from the (,'ouimittee on 
Health, subinilted rrpori.s as follows: In favor of 
granting i)etilioii of James L. Miller and J. H. Wig- 
glesworth, for leave to occupy wooden Btables. Sev- 
erally accepted. 

Leave to withdraw on petition of John Bntland, 
for leave to occupy wooden stable. Accepted. 

THE STABLB OF HEIRS OF WII-LIAM BRIOHAM. 

Alderman Worthington submitted a report from 
the committee on Health, on the petition of J. i\l. 
Smith, for leave to occupy a riding-school stable for 
sixty four horses, on rear of 3043 Washington street. 
The Committee being unable to agree, refer the 
whole subject to the full Board for their considera- 
tion. 

Alderman Worthington — I move that the peti- 
tioners have leave to withdraw. This petition has 
been before this Board two or three times, and if I 
remember rightly the location of the proposed stable 
is in the rear of 1043 Washington street. It is be- 
tween Groton and Washington streets, Medford 
court, Shawmut avenue and Briggs place. The pe- 
titioners propose to put a stable iu there four stories 
high, which will occupy most of the interior of this 
square. In the second and tnird stories tnere is to 
be a riding school, and the upper story and the 
basement are to be used for storage purposes. If we 
grant this petition, I think it will be a serious incon- 
venience to those who occupy the dwellings in the 
surrounding streets. Those houses are occupied by 
families, who will be seriously incommoded by ttie 
erection of this stable, and I think it will prove a 
disadvantage to the city. For that reason 1 move 
that the petitioners have leave to withdraw. 

Alderman Power offered the following as a substi- 
tute for the motion of Alderman Worthington: 

Ordered, That a permit be granted to J. M. Smith 
to erect a stable in rear of 104;i Washington street, 
for sixty-four horses, said stable to be constructed 
of brick (for riding school purposes), and to conform 
to statute law of 18b9, chapter Slid. 

Alderman Power — In support of this order, I wish 
to say that this matter was before the City Govern- 
ment last year, but in another shape. It came then 
is the form of a petition for leave to locate and use 
a steam engine on the premises. The owners of the 
land got permission to build a tirst-class brick build- 
ing for manufacturing purposes, which, of course, 
required a steam engine, and they came here 
to get that privilege. The owners of the 
surrounding land remonstrated against the lo- 
cation there of a steam engine, and against 
the putting up of a building for manufacturing 
purposes. Their principal reason was that such a 
building would shut all the light from their dwell- 
ings. That should not be any reason why the Board 
should refuse to grant such a privilege. The parties 
own their land; they have the right to cover it with 
. a building, and nobody can prevent them, if it is 
built in conformity with law. But the owners are 
obliged to come here if they wish to use a steam en- 
gine. Nobody can prevent them from putting up a 
l)uilding that will cover all the land, if they wish. 
The owners of the surrounding estates also stated that 
such a building would be dangerous in case of lire. 
The matter was fully argued here on both sides, and 
permission to use a steam engine on the premises was 
refused. At that time I was on the Committee on 
Steam Engines, as chairman, and that committee were 
unanimously in favor of granting leave to use the 
engine. Previous to that the Committee on Health 
refused to grant a permit to locate a new stable there. 
I stated at the time that if I had been a member of 
the Committee on Health 1 would have voted to 
grant them permission to erect the stable. I did not 
expect that I was going to be put on the Committee 
on Health, and that I should have to act upon this 
matter again. I did not request the appointment, 
and parties who are interested in this matter will 
please not construe my action as an endeavor to 
follow up the subject. But I have not seen any 
leason since to change my mind. There is room 
enough for two stables, and to put as many horses 
in there as they ask for. That place is about as 
great a nuisance today as can be found in 
any part of the city. The owners of the land 
proDose to tear down this old building, and 
wipe out this nuisance, of which the people 
have complained and which they have tried to re- 
move. The owners of the land propose to put up a 
first-class riding school there,— a first-class stable 
with all the modern improvements— and to remove 
those old stables. They can keep those horses there 
if they see fit— there is room enough; but if they get 
permission to put up this building they intend to 



erect a flrst-class riding school and remove the old 
building. The owners of surrounding land stale 
that all the water and all the nuisance from those old 
stables run into their cellare. They have repeatedly 
complained of the nuisance, and now the owners of 
the land propose to wipe it all out by constructing a 
flrst-class building, with cemented cellar and drains, 
so that no nuisance will arise from it. In fact it Is pro- 
posed to have a moacl stable, as is shown on the 
plan. Now, I believe that a stable, properly con- 
ducted, with all the modern improvements, is just as 
much a necessity in the city as dwelling houses are, 
and I belie-ve it is our duty to encourage all business 
enterprises which are legitimate and for the interest 
of the city of Boston. If we donot grant this permit 
the estates of these gentlemen certainly will not be 
very desirable. I think we could not do their prop- 
erty more damage than if we prevent the erection of 
this stable. I can show by the petitions of some of 
the very best people in the city of Boston that the 
establishment to be conducted there is first class, 
and is greatly needed. It is to be conducted by 
a gentleman who formerly kept a riding school 
in the rear of 41.5 Washington street, on the Dexter 
estate, and who was burned out. Residents of the 
adjacent houses allege that it is going to injure 
their property; I say it is going to enhance its value. 
Those dwellings must give way for business prop- 
erty. It is not for the interest of the owner to put 
anything there that will make the property less val- 
uable than it is today. This land is said to be worth 
$10 a foot, and that shows what the business is worth 
to use land of such value. As I said before the 
dwelling houses must give way for business. What 
would be the need of business if we are not going to 
have the landy In fact, the owners of the surround- 
ing land say that when it is agreed to put up 
just such a building on that lot as they want, 
they will not object. I have known that place 
for thirty years, and^there is n't a greater nui- 
sance at the South" End than it is. Now. 
sir, it has been said that it will hurt the 
character of the neighborhood. [The Alderman read 
the petition of numerous residents of the South End 
in aid of the petition of J. M. Smith for leave to lo- 
cate the riding school on the premises; also the 
names of the petitioners in aid of the petition 
of J. M. Smith.] I read these names to show 
who the customers of Mr. Smith arc, and that 
he keeps a respectable establishment. If he did not 
he would not have such a respectable array of sup- 
porters. The names of those persons should be a 
sufficient guarantee to this Board of the character of 
the establishment which has been kept by Mr. 
Smith. These ladies are all his customers and they 
and their children have been deprived of the oppor- 
tunity of taking this exercise which you will all agree 
is very essential to their health. It is said by the 
gentleman on my left that it is proposed to cover the 
whole of the land on this square. I don't believe he 
intended to convey a wrong impression, but I think 
he forgot the plan. They propose to leave sufficient 
room for engines, hose carts, etc., to enter in case 
there should be fire, which will . meet another objec- 
tion which has been raised. These are my reasons 
for thinking the prayer of the petitioners should be 
granted. I should not offer an order, nor would I 
vote for any measure before this Board, that I 
thought was going to injure any person to the 
benefit of another. I say such an establish- 
ment will enhance the value of this surround- 
ing property. The abutters may not like this 
stable; it may not be so pleasant as to have 
the open. space that there is now; but I say they will 
not "suffer in a pecuniary point of view. Therefore, 
I hope the substitute order will be adopted. 

On motion of Alderman Peters further considera- 
tion of the subject was specially assigned for Mon- 
day next at five o'clock P. M., that members not 
familiar with the locality should have an opportunity 
to visit it. 

NOMINATIONS OF ASSESSORS. 

Alderman Harris submitted a report from the Joint 
Standing Committee on Assessors' Department, 
nominating, in accordance with the provisions of the 
ordnance relating thereto, the fellowing-named per- 
sons as assessors of taxes for the city of Boston: 

Thomas Hills, Horace Smith, Benjamin Cushing, 
Thomas J. Bancroft, Daniel H. Whitney. 

The report was accepted. 

Alderman Harris, from the Committee on Streets, 
submitted orders to pay for street damages as 
follows: 

Heirs Edward Tufts, $258.3, widening Pearl street; 
Little Sisters of the Poor, $:3U)4 10. widening Maga- 
zine street. 

Severally passed. 

On motion of Alderman Harris, the Board ad- 
journed. 



COMMON COUISrCIL. 



32 



CITY OF BO STON. 

Proceedings of the Oominon Council, 

JANUARY «9, 1874. 

The regular weekly meeting of the Common Conn" 
eil was hela at half -past seven o'clwck P. M., E. O. 
Shepard, President, in the chair. 

On motion of Mr. Barnes of Ward 11 a call of the 
roll of members was ordered: 

Present— Messrs. Abbott, Adams, Barnes, Barry, 
Beal, Bearce, Bent, Boardman. Brackett, Burditt, Bur- 
gess, Butler, Cawley, Crocker. Crowley, Cudworth, 
Cushman, Dacey, Davis, Day, Dean, Flatley, Flynn, 
Goldthwait, Gordon, Harrington, Hicks, Hine, 
Hunnewell, Jennings, Kent, Kimball, Long, Lor- 
ing, Martin, McCarty, Minot, Mooney, Morse, 
Noyee, Page, Pease, Powers, Pray, Putnam, 
Shaw, Sibley, Sprague, Sweat, Sweet«er, Thacher, 
Train, Walbridge, Warren, West. Weston, Whiston, 
E, P. Wilbur, N. 8. Wilbur, Willcutt, Wood- 
ward— 61. 

Absent — Messrs. Bleiler, Brown, Collins, Denny, 
Fuller, Leach, Peabody, Perkins, Rust-ell, Smith, 
Woods— 11. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Petitions of James A. Kemp, Trustees of Boston 
College, Joseph Gahm, Joshua C. Stone, Old Colony 
Railroad, and request of Board of Health. Severally 
referred in concurrence. 

Report of the Board of Commissioners on the Sink- 
ing Funds for the redemption of the city debt. (City 
Doc. No. 15.) Placed on file. 

Communication from the Mayor, transmitting pa- 
pers relating to an assessment made upon the late 
city of Ctiarlestown, on account of tide water dis- 
placed by filling flats in Prison-Point Bay. Referred 
to Committee on Harbor. 

Request of Committee ou Common, etc., for $700 
to pay for temporary sidewalk on westerly side of 
Tremont street, between Park and Boylston streets. 
Referred to Committee on Finance. 

Report of the Committee on Public Lands that, in 
order to properly improve the Swett-street Hospital 
wharf and lot, Swett street should be laid out as a 
public way from Albany to Dorchester street. 

The question was on referring the report to the 
Board of Street Commissioners, in concurrence. 

Mr. Train of Ward 13 — I move that the reference 
be amended by, adding the following: "With a re- 
quest that the Board of Street Commissioners take 
tne necessary steps to lay out Swett street from Al- 
bany street to Dorchester street as early as possible." 
My object in olfering that amendment is that the 
Street Commissioners may feel authorized to take 
immediate steps to carry out this project, which 
seems to be a favorite one with the commissioners, 
the Committee on Streets and citizens generally. I 
do not wish to dictate to the commissioners, but I 
thought it proper to give them a hint of what the 
City Council wanted. It is considered a matter of 
great importance, but 1 will not go into any argument 
upon that point. I merely offer the amendment to 
start it in the proper direction, and I hope the Coun- 
cil will take the right view of it. 

Mr. Flynn of Wara 7—1 he Street Committee had 
this subject of the extension of Swett street under 
consideration this afternoon, and I think that to 
amend the order, as is proposed by the gentleman 
from Ward 13, might cause some trouble, which the 
committee are not desirous of having done. I hope 
the report will be referred as it came from the other 
branch, as the Street Committee are looking into the 
matter now. 

Mr. Train of Ward 13 — I shall not press the amend- 
ment now. At a meeting of the committee on the 
Northampton-street District, yesterday, this matter 
was very fully discussed. Upon reading the news- 
papers this morning, I saw that i^y the action of the 
Harbor Commissioners the greatest impediment to 
the carrying out of this matter last year had been 
overcome by their recommendation of the solid fill- 
ing of the flats. Therefore I will not press the 
amendment if the gentleman objects; my object 
being simply to start this matter and get the Street 
Commissioners to prepare their plans, so that we 
shall not have to.wait till later in the season. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 — I understand that the time 
allowed for the filling of this street runs out in April, 
and that an application to the Legislature for an ex- 
tension of the time has already been made by the 
Street Commissioners. I think it would be bet- 
ter not to take action until that extension has been 
granted. 

Mr. Train withdrew his amendment and the report 
was referred to the Board of Street Commissioners. 

Order requesting Committee on Ordinances to con- 
sider expediency of giving the Committee on Survey, 
etc., of Buildings fuU powers to decide on all ques- 
tions referred to them concerning the erection of 
wooden buildings. Passed. 



Report nominating Thomas Hills, Benjamin Cnsh- 
ing, Horace Smith, Thomas J. Bancroft and Daniel 
H. Whitney as Assessors. Accepted. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order authorizing the Superintendent of Health to 
purchase hay and grain and other material required 
in his department. 

Passed. 

Order authorizing the City Surveyor to purchase 
necessary supplies and material for his department. 

Passed. 

Order authorizing proper fences to be placed on 
the roof of the Court House to prevent the falling of 
SHOW therefrom. 

Mr. Powers of Ward 4— As this matter is clearly 
within the jurisdiction of the Board of Aldermen, 
and an order similar to this has been introduc^id 
there and referred to the Committee on Public 
Buildings, I move the indefinite postponement of 
this order. 

The motion prevailed. 

Order authorizing the Committee on Northamp- 
ton-street District to exercise all the powers, in rela- 
tion to SuflEolk-street district, which were conferred 
on the committee for 1873. 

Passed. 

REPORT OP COMMISSIONERS OF BRIDGES BETWEEN 
BOSTON AND CAMBRIDGE. 

The Commissioners ou West Boston and Canal or 
Craigie's Bridges submitted their third annual report 
(City Doc. No. 16) of matters relatiuLj to the care and 
management of said bridges. 

West Boston. Bridge. The draw of this bridge was 
thoroughly repaired early in the spring, and in addi- 
tion to the improvfacients made in its construction 
steam power was applied for moving it and aiding 
vessels in their passage through the draw ways. The 
machinery used for these purposes consists of an 
eight horse power engine with double cylinders, a 
line of horizontal shafting geared to and extending 
from the engine to a vertical shaft, to which it is also 
geared, a toothed wheel which is on the upper end of 
this vertical shaft and is partially encircled by a 
chain, the ends of which are connected with the 
upper track frame of the draw, and a line of shafting 
extending to the edges of the draw pier at right 
angles to the shafting running the draw, the ends of 
this shaft being provided with winch heads, which, 
are used in pulling vessels. The engine house is a 
plain but substantial wooden structure and contains 
two rooms, one for the engine and its appurtenances^ 
and the other for the use of the engineer; a shed 
attached to it contains the coal bin and water tank. 
The operation of the machinery has proved 
perfectly satisfactory to your commissioners, 
and prevents much of the delay formerly so 
annoying to the travel upon this bridge. The 
time occupied in opening and closing the draw was. 
before the application of the machinery, about seven 
minutes; it now seldom exceeds one minute. Ves- 
sels were frequently from fifteen to twenty-five min- 
utes in passing through; they can now be taken 
through in from five to seven minutes. The bridge 
is in good order, and will require but a small outlay 
for repairs during the ensuing year. The expense of 
maintenance has been increased to some extent by 
the application of steam-power and the substitution 
of gas for oil in lighting the bridge; but your com- 
missioners feel confident that the benefits derived 
therefrom amply compensate for the additional cost. 

Canal or Cragie's Bridge. The plans for the recon- 
structisn of this bridge, which were fully described 
in our last annual report, were presented to the Har- 
bor Commission for their approval in February. At 
an informal hearing given by the commission, it was 
ascertained that a snecial act of the Legislature would 
be required to enable your commissioners to proceed 
with the rebuilding as proposed. Application for an 
act was immediately made to the Legislature, but its 
passage was not secured until the 15th of April. 
After the passage of the act, the plans were again 
submitted to the Harbor Commission for their ap- 
proval, which they failed to receive. The objections 
made by the Harbor Commission to the plans as 
proposed, were the driving of intermediate piers in 
the portion of the bridge between the new draw-way 
and the Cambridge end, and the driving of inter- 
mediate piles in the piers between the draw-way and 
the Boston end. The present piers not being in the 
line of the current are, in the opinion of tue commis- 
sion, a serious obstruction to the water-way, any in- 
crease of which, by driving more piles, would be at- 
tended with injurious results to the harbor. The 
modification of the plans to render them acceptable 
to the Harbor Commission required considerable 
time, and as it was too late in the season for the 
work of rebuilding to be commenced, with any pros- 
pect of its being completed before cold weather, it 
was deemed advisable to postpone any further action 
until the coming year. Alterations which have been 
made in the plans will involve an increased expendit- 
ure of $22,000 in rebuilding the bridge, and, as the 



83 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



machinery for moving the draw on West Boston 
Bridge has ])roved so Batisfactory, we propose to 
duplicate it on Cragie's, at an expuuee for machin- 
ery, water pipe, tanks, en<..ine house, etc., of 
f5000; making the total estimated cost of re- 
nildine; the l)ridge $187,000 In this connec- 
tion the commi-^sioiiers feel called upon to say that 
they would hi- i^lad to recommend to the two cities 
which tliey jointly represent, the removal of the 
present brid;:e structure, and the building of a brid£;e 
with stone or iron piers and an iron superstructure. 
The bridges connecting Cambridge and Boston 
cross the channel which connects the Charles-Rirer 
basin with the harbor, and any increase in their num- 
ber obstructs the tlow in the channel and diminishes 
the value of the tidal basin. The eminent engineers 
wljo, in connection with the Harbor Commission, 
have given this subject so much study, looking to 
the future interests of the cities on both sides of the 
river, are opposed to any increase in the number or 
extent of the obstructions, and the commission will 
not probably consent to the build'ng of any more 
bridges upon the plan of the present ones, especially 
as the annoyance and expense attendant upon the 
frequently recurring repair and reconstruction could 
be obviated by replacing them with practically inde- 
structible structures. The principal and we may say 
the only reason why we do not recommend the re- 
placing of Cragie's Bridge by an iron or similar per- 
manent structure, is the great cost, which, in the 
present financial condition of Boston and Cambridge, 
we do not feel would be warranted. A bridge of the 
character we mention would cost at least $.500,000, 
whereas the esti mated expense of rebuilding the bridge 
in accordance with our present plans is less than one- 
half of this s'lm; the interest on the difference of 
cost for a psriod of eight or ten years would rebuild 
the bridge in its present form. The substructure of 
an oak-pile bridge will last an indefinite time in a 
situation where it is not subjected to the ravages of 
worms. Many of the piles in Cragie's Bridge have 
been there for seventy years, and are still in a fair 
state of preservation. The superstructure, or such 
portions of it as may be unprotected from the 
weather, will require renewal in twelve or fifteen 
years, and even in less time if the timber used is not 
of good quality. The expense of renewing the por- 
tions of the superstructure most liable to decay is 
small in comparison with the total cost of the bridge; 
and, in the case of the bridge under consideration, 
the interest on the difference in cost of the two 
plans would amount in three years to a sum large 
enongh to do all that would be required to make the 
bridge, at the end of twelve or fifteen years, good for 
an additional term of the same length. 

While, therefore, we acknowledge it would be de- 
sirable to build a permanent structure, we think the 
reasons for not recommending it, which we have 
fully explained, will justify us in the conclusion that 
i t cannot at present be shown to be the most econom- 
ical, although it may not be many years l)efore the 
price of timber will be so enhanced by the reckless 
destruction of the forests as to malce the cost of a 
pile bridge closely approximate to that of one of iron 
or stone. 

It is our intention to advertise for proposals for re- 
building this bridge as soon as the revised plans have 
received the approval of the Harbor Commission, 
and the work will be put under contract immediately, 
to allow ample time for the contractor to obtain the 
piles and timber befsre commencing work in the 
spring. 

The unstable condition of the present bridge has 
been a source of anxiety during the past year, and it 
has only been by constant watchfulness and imme- 
diate repair of tlie weak places as soon as observed 
that accident to or stoppage of the travel has been 
prevented. Appended to the report is a statement 
of the payments made by the City of Boston on ac- 
count of the bridges from January 1, 1873, to Janua- 
ry 1, 1874, together with a statement from the draw- 
tenders of the number of times the draws were 
opened during the same term. 

Number of times the araw on West Boston Bridge 
has been opened during the following months. 
Charles W. Blaney Superintendent, John McNulty 
Engineer: January. 1873, 2; February, 1873, 6; March, 
1873, 50; April, 1873, 147; May, 1873, 188; June. 1873, 
193; July, 1873, 207; August, 1873, 154; September, 
1873, 139; October, 1873, 132; November, 1873, 183; 
December, 1873, 77. Total one year, 1478. 

Number of times the draw on Craigie's Bridge has 
been opened during the following months Cyrus 
Bruce Superintendent: January, 1873, 24; February, 
1873, 21; March. 1873. 115; April, 1873, 408: May, 1873, 
646; June, 1873, 689; July, 1873,596; August, 1873,493; 
September, 1873. 398; October, 1873, 445; November, 
1873, 387; Decen.ber, 1873, 177. Total one year, 4399. 

The expenses of Boston for maintaining the Cam- 
bridge bridges during the year 1873, inclusive, were 
as follows, as per accounts of the City Auditor: 
General— Salary of Commissioner, $500; enjjiBeer- 



ing expenses, $150 25; damages for defect in bridge, 
$.50. Total, $700 25. West Boston Bridge— Salaries, 
Superintendent and Engineer, $726 72; engine and 
shafting, $1262 72; repairs, $2.589 01; supplies and 
care of lamps, $481 .59; gas, $589 82. Total, $56.50 46. 
Canal Bridge — Salary of Superintendent, $629 95; 
repairs, $1089 ;i5; supplies and care of lamps, $274 85. 
Total, $1994 15. Grand total, $8:344 86. 
The report was sent up. 

CEBTIFICATE OP APPOINTMENT. 

The President presented a certificate from the City 
Clerk that the members of the Common Council of 
1S74 have been duly nominated by his Honor the 
Mayor and coufiriued by the Board of Aldermen as 
special police officers without pay. for the present 
municipal year. Read and placed on file. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

By Mr. Thacher of Ward 15 — Petition of F. Hunne- 
well for lease of laud at Chestnut-Hill Reservoir. 
Referred to Water Board. 

By Mr. Sprague of Ward 4— Petition of Daniel Mc- 
Davitt for abatement of water tax on houses Nos. 
406, 408, 414 and 416 Commercial street. Referred to 
Cemmittee on Water. 

By Mr. Pray of Ward 21— Petitions of Company C, 
First Battalion, M. V. M., and Company G, Ninth 
Regiment, M. V. M., for allowance for armory rent. 
Severally referred to Committee on Armories. 

By Mr. Sibley of Ward 20— Petitions of Willard 
Rice et al., and F. S. Gilman et al., citizens of 
Wards 20, 21 and 22, that the name of Charlestown 
may not be changed by the action of the City Gov- 
ernment. Severally laid on the table, on motion of 
Mr. Sibley. 

By Mr. Woodward of Ward 13— Petition of W. H. 
Piper et al., that Lamartine street be put in order for 
public travel. Sent up. 

Remonstrance of B. K. Randolph et al., against 
petition of trustees of Boston College. Referred to 
Committee on Public Lands. 

REPORTS OP COMMITTEES. 

Mr. Thacher of Ward 15, from the Joint Standing 
Committee on Claims, to whom was referred the pe- 
tition of William Hannan, for compensation for dam- 
ages to his team, by an alleged defect in a sireet on 
Meeting House Hill, submitted a report recommend- 
ing that the petitioner have leave to withdraw. 
Accepted. 

Mr. Flatley of Ward 4, from the joint special com- 
mittee appointed to nominate a saitable candidate for 
Superintendent of Common and Public Grounds, 
submitted a report recommending the eleciion of 
John Galvin. Accepted. 

Mr. Wilbur of Ward 13, from the joint special com- 
mittee appointed to nominate a suitable candidate 
for Water Registrar, submitted a report recommend- 
ing the election of William F. Davis. Accepted. 

Mr. Woodward of Ward 13, from the joint special 
committee appointed to nominate a suitable candi- 
date for Superintendent of Streets, submitted a re- 
port recommending the election of Charles Harris. 
Accepted. 

Mr. Woods of Ward 8, from the joint special com- 
mittee appointed to nominate a suitable candidate 
for Superintendent of Public Buildings, sultmitted a 
report recommending the election of James C. 
Tucker. Accepted 

Mr. Kimball of Ward 6, from the joint special 
committee appointed to nominate a suitable candi- 
date for City Solicitor, submitted a report recom- 
mending the election of John P. Healy. Accepted. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 submitted a report from the 
Joint Standing Committee on Streets, on the order 
requesting the Street Commissioners to lay out Par- 
ker street from Beacon street to Tremont street, and 
the petition of G. Washington Warren and others, 
that measures may be taken by the City Council to 
expedite the laying out and extension of Boylston 
street to Western or Brookline avenue. They re- 
ported that the Street Commissioners are now pre- 
paring plans for streets aid avenues over the lands 
and flats lying between Beacon street. Western ave- 
nue, Longwood avenue and the Boston & Providence 
Railroad, under an order passed by the last City 
Council; and the committee would therefore recom- 
mend that the petition and the order be referred to 
that board. 

The report was accepted, and the reference or- 
dered as recommended. 

Mr. Thacher of Ward 15, from the joint special 
committee, appointed to nomina'e a «uitable candi- 
date for City Messenger, submitted a report recom- 
mending the election of Alvah H. Pet»»rB Ac- 
cepted. 

Mr. Thacher of Ward 15, from the joint special 
committee, appointed to nominate a suitable candi- 
date for the office of Superintendent of Sewers, sub- 
mitted a report recommending the election of Wil- 
liam H. Bradley. Accepted. 

Mr. Thacher of Ward 15, from the joint special 
committee appointed to nominate a suitable candi- 
date for the office of Superintendent of Public Lands. 



JANUARY 39 



18 7-1 



34 



submitted a report recommending the election of 
Robert vV. Hall. Accepted. 

Mr. Davis of Ward 14, from the Joint Standing 
Committee on Armories, submitted a report repre- 
Bentiug that orders were passed by the last City 
Council appropriating $1200 for repairing the armory 
of Company D, First Battalion of Cavalry. $383 10 for 
repairing the armoiy of Company I, Ninth Regiment 
of Infantry, and $250 for repairing the headquarters 
the First Battalion of Light Artillery. Through inad- 
vertence the bills for these repairs were not appioved 
before the end of the municipal year, and it becomes 
necessary to give the present committee authority to 
pass upon them. The committee recommended the 
passage of the accompanying orders: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Armories be 
authorized to expend a sum not exceeding $1200 in 
repairing and furnishing the armory of Company D, 
First Battalion of Cavalry, M. V. M., at 1839 Wash- 
ington street; said sum to be charged to the appro- 
priation for Armories. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Armories be au- 
thorized to expend a sum not exceeding $250 in re- 
pairing and furnishing the headquarters of ihe First 
Battalion of Light Artillery, M. V. M., at37Tremont 
street; said sum to be charged to the appropriation 
for Armories. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Armories be au- 
thorized to expend an additional sum, not exceeding 
$383 10. in repairing and furnishing the armory oc- 
cupied by Company I, Ninth Regiment of Infantry, 
M. V. M., at No. 544 Washington street; said sum to 
be charged to the appropriation for Armories. 

Mr. Davis of Ward 14— On account of the facts 
stated in the report, and further that the work has 
been contracted for and performed, I move a suspen- 
sion of the rules, that the orders may be passed this 
evening and the parties obtain their money. 

The rules were suspended and the orders were sev- 
erally passed — yeas 68. nays 0. 

THB WATER SUPPLY. 

On motion of Mr. Dean of Ward 13— 

Ordered, That the Joint Standin? Committee on 
Water consider and report upon the feasibility and 
expense of adding to the waters in Mystic Pond a 
supply sufficient for the use of the city, by connect- 
ing said pond with Shawshine, Concord and Mer- 
rimac rivers, or either of them, by the use of the bed 
of Middlesex Canal, or otherwise. 

Mr. Dean of Ward 13— As I probably shall not be 
present at the next meeting of the Council, and as 
the project contemplated in this order is one that 
should be in the hands of the committee as eaily as 
possible, I felt it my duty to present it to the 
Council this evening. I have a very considerable 
acquaintance with the topography of Middlesex 
County, having lived there during much of the larger 
part of my life, and I think that I can state the rea- 
sons which should induce a careful consideration of 
the project contemplated by this order. It is well 
known that in Middlesex County there was what was 
formerly called the Middlesex Canal, which ran from 
Charlestown to Lowell, connecting the waters of 
Boston Harbor with the waters of Merrimac River. 
I have myself been over that canal, when a bov, in a 
packet; and, formerly, nearly all the cotton, produce 
and perhaps pretty much all the property that went 
to Lowell from Boston went by way of this canal, and 
in return the manufactured goods came by way of 
this canal from Lowell to Boston. It was mainly sup- 
plied by the waters of the Concord and Merrimac riv- 
ers, the w?ters from each running through the bed 
of the canal in either direction, emptying at one end 
into the Merrimac River, and into the harbor at 
Charlestown at the other. In its progress towards 
Boston it crossed Shawshine River by the edge of this 
side of Billerica. Shawshine River, there, ;f I recol- 
lect rightly fi-om observation, is 12, 13 or 14 feet 
below the aqueduct, as it then was, and the bed 
of the Middlesex Canal. By damming the river at 
this point, or by running a branch of the canal a lit- 
tle way up the valley of the Shawshine, the water 
will be as high as the canal. From there it 
comes to Horn Pond— at any rate the canal had its 
main supply in Concord River and came nearly 
on a level to Horn Pond, which is one of the 
reservoirs of Mystic Pond. There are no tunnels on 
the route; it is nearly level, and Concord River is 
largely formed by the Sudbury River and Assabet. 
So that if those waters should be considered 
suitable, in Concord River you have the waters of 
Sudbury and Assabet rivers, of the same quality as 
the Sudbury, and a much larger supply, because it 
embraces the watersheds of the Concord River and 
its tributaries, and the canal also connects with the 
Merrimac Rirer. Thus you have got almost a level 
bed, already graded, hut now disused. But the bed of 
the canal must in part still remain, and it would seem 
at first blush as if it would be a very easy matter, 
and a very cheap way— very much cheaper than 
building miles of tunnel— and cheap as to the mode 
of supplying Mystic Pond with the waters of any of 
these three rivers. Shawshine River comes first, and 

ifeiilliiMiiiiMtaMaHiki 



from Horn Pond. This Shawshine River is 
a very considerable brook where the canal crosses 
it. It drains Lexington, Concord, Bedford, Burling- 
ton, and all that section over the ridge from the 
watershed of Mystic Pond. The waters of Shaw- 
shine River are very excellent in quality, running 
through a hard, gravelly country. After it crosses 
the canal this river goes down and supplies the mills 
of Ballardvale, Frye Village in North Andover, and 
discharges its water just below the Lawrence dam. 
It would seem to me, therefore, that unless there are 
some engineering difficulties — which are now im- 
possible to conceive of — this would present a 
very cheap means of supplementing the pres- 
ent supply in Mystic Pond to a very in- 
definite extent. If the waters of the Shaw- 
shine have been used they would just about equal 
the watershed of the Mystic at the upper pond; and 
when those fail, if it is necessary, you can stretch on 
to Concord River and get a larger supply than from 
Sudbury River. And if at any time the Merrimac 
waters should be preferred, it is a very few miles 
farther before you reach the Merrimac River —and all 
that along a bed already graded. 

Mr. Pease of Ward 1— I would like to ask the gen- 
tleman from Ward 13 if that could be done without 
legislative enactment. 

Mr. Dean of Ward 12 — I do not know what are the 
powers granted by the act under which the Water 
Board is now acting, but it certainly would be very 
easy to obtain the requisite legislative authority. And 
if it should turn out that it was furnishing a much 
cheaper supply of water than by the means now con- 
templiiti-d— if, lor instance, millions of dollars could 
be saved — of course the little delay required would be 
nothing in comparison with that which would be 
gained. Besides, in point of expedition, it would 
seem to me, taking the requisite time to obtain legis- 
lative action and for the construction of works, you 
would still gain very largely in that respect. 

Mr. Pease of Ward 1— 1 did not ask the question 
because I was opposed to the gentleman's order. I 
hope this matter of a water supply will be thoroughly 
discussed, and that our action may be final. But the 
act empowering the city to take water from Sudbury 
River expressly says it shall betaken above Framing- 
ham. 

Mr. Dean of Ward 12 (Unanimous consent being 
given)— When these legislative grants are secured 
they are generally obtained by means of an agree- 
ment among parties. There are two sides, the pe- 
titioners and tiie remonstrants, and they agree 8ub> 
stantially to what shall be done 

Mr. Noyes of Ward 5— I would like to ask the gen- 
tleman how many mills there are between here and 
the place where the Cochituate Water Board propose 
to take water at the present time. 

Mr. Dean of Ward 12 — I can only say from what I 
gather from the report of the board that there are 
mills on the river from which the board contemplates 
taking it now, and also upon Assabet River. But 
until you reach Middlesex Canal, where it formerly 
crossed Concord River at Middlesex Mills, there are 
none; there are none between Middle^ex Canal and 
the contemplated conduit from Sudbury River, a 
distance of some twenty-five miles. 

The order was passed. 

On motion ot Mr. Warren of Ward 12 — 

Ordered, That the Joint Stanv.ing Committee on 
Water be requested to considei the expediency of 
making a permanent water connection between Farm 
Pond and Lake Cochituate, and building a conduit 
from Lake Cochituate to Chestnut-Hill Reservoir, 
said conduit to be bridged over Charles River, instead 
of siphons in said river, and report an estimate of 
the cost of same. 

Passed. 

BADGES. 

On motion of Mr. Martin of Ward 7, the order for 
the appointment of a committee to procure badges 
for members of the Common Council was taken from 
the table. 

The question was on the amendment offered by 
Mr. Kimball of Ward 6, to insert the word "new" 
before the word "members." 

Mr. Kimball of Ward 6—1 believe that the object I 
had in view in offering that amendment can be 
reached in another way, and which appears to relieve 
the Council of some embarrassment in making a dis- 
tinction between the old and new members. I desire, 
therefore, to withdraw the amendment and to offer 
another, so that the order shall read "'prO' 
cure suitable badges for members of the Common 
Council, at an expense not exceeding five dollars for 
each badge." I had in view, in offering the first 
amendment, that, if the old members of the CommoH 
Council would consent to a change of date upon their 
badges, those for the new members could be procur- 
ed at the same expense as last year. It was for that 
reason, and for that alone, that I desired to insert the 
word "new." But, as many members of the Coun- 
cil prefer to retain their badges, with the date upon 
them, I have offered this amendment limiting the 



35 



COMMOlSr COUNCIL. 



Mr. Crocker of Ward 6— I hope that the amend- 
ment will be adopted. It seems very proper that, if 
we are to have badges, there should be new ones 
all round; but I think t'lere should be some limit to 
the expense. If we limit the price to live dollars it 
will be the same as saying to the committee that we 
do not want a gold badge. I think five dollars a 
large limit for the price of such a badge as we need, 
but I am perfectly willing to have it to the commit- 
tee to determine the kind of badge. Five dollars 
per badge is a reasonable limit, and it seems to me 
that this body might as well leave to the committee 
the responsibility of determining whether the badges 
shall be of gold or silver. 

Mr. Flyun of Ward 7—1 move to amend the amend- 
ment by striking out the word "five" and inserting 
the word "fifteen." 

Mr. Minot of Ward 17 — I observe a smile on the 
faces of the old members of the Council as I get up 
Mr. President, though I have observed that 
outside the City Hall the smiling is all the 
other way, as outside they consider it puer- 
ile for gentlemen to haggle about the cost 
of such an article, whether it shall be five or 
fifteen dollars. If they cost fifteen dollars each it 
will be the same as funding twenty-five thou- 
sand dollars of the city debt. It is not the 
mere trifle of twenty-five hundred dollars that I look 
at. The feeling is now rife and it is a fact that, 
with one exception, Boston is the most extravagant- 
ly managed city in the United States. In view of 
that fact, we ought to show a disposition to econ- 
omize. I think these gentlemen will all find that with 
the public the smile is the other way. 

Mr. Barry of Ward 7—1 move that the order be in- 
definitely postponed. 

The President — The motion is out of order; the 
motion to amend takes precedence. 

Mr. Dacey of Ward 20 — Will the gentleman please 
tell me where the Council gets authority to vote 
themselves these badges. As one of the new mem- 
bers, I ask for information. 

The President— The Chair can only say that the 
order is a proper one and is in order. 

Mr. Dacey of Ward 20—1 only wished to know 
where they get the authority. 

The President— The Chair cannot inform the gen- 
tleman. 

Mr. Dacey of Ward 20— That does not answer my 
question. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5 — This is a very cheap way of 
making a little very cheap capital, and it has been 
started by gentlemen who come here for the first 
time. Now, sir, I came here for the first time a con- 
siderable number of years ago, when we had a tin 
badge. If I were going to move any amendment, in 
order to make cheap capital, I should propose a tin 
badge. I don't believe it is the right kind of econ- 
omy for us to begin to practise in this line. When we 
talk in regard to the proposition made by the gentle- 
man on my left, from Ward 12. there is a chance for 
economy, and I am proud to see that he has tonight 
offered a proposition in which I believe the people 
of Boston will heartily agree with him. But this lit- 
tle three-cent matter of a badge for members of the 
Council, whether they be old or new members, 
is too small to talk about. And when my friend on 
my left from Ward 17 says he notices a smile outside 
of the City Hall, I say it is a cheap kind of smile. 
There are a great many kinds of smiles; some people 
smile early, some often, and others seldom smile. I 
don't feel much like smiling myself, having been 
pretty hard at work all day. But I do feel like say- 
ing that this is a small matter to higgle over. I am 
in favor of the amendment of the gentleman from 
Ward 7, and when it is said here that the people of 
Boston smile about this matter, it is cheaper than 
anything else. I think the members of the Council 
should have some recognition. I would like to 
know what the perquisites of the position are. 
Is there anything, from January to January, 
that comes as a perquisite? There is this 
little matter of a badge, which I am happy to 
carry about with me. I think it is not only 
an ornament, but it is an honor for members of the 
Common Council to have something by which they can 
be recognized— something worthy of the position 
which vve hold. I do not think the sum of fifteen dollars 
for a badge is any too much to give to each membsr of 
this Council as a perquisite. I think, sir, that we 
labor hard here for the best'lhterest of the city; I 
try to, at least, and I have no doubt that other gen- 
tlemen do. But when We come to talk about this 
matter I think the smiles of our constituents will be 
on the other side of the mouth. I think they would 
smile at our having anything less than a respecta- 
ble, decent badge. I hope the amendment of the 
gentleman from Ward 7 will prevail. 

Mr. Minot of Ward 17—1 have ne doubt Mr. Shaw's 
constituents will laugh at his position if he yielded 
in this matter, but I think my constituents will think 
differently. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5— I shall not allow an invidious 



Hill, or from the green garden district, wbicb he 
represents, I hope it will be shown that the people 
have not sent green young men to represent tlie 
green young sward. 

Mr. Dacey of Ward 20—1 hope it will not be con- 
sidered amiss for new members to ask for informa- 
tion, if we think it is wrong to vote away the peo- 
ple's money for badges. I trust that when 
we get the waters of Horn Pond we shall 
all smile. I don't see the necessity for 
these badges, any way. Our action is to be 
published in the newspapers and our constituents 
will know whether we are fit to represent them. I 
hope gentlemen will respect our opinions and that we 
shall heiir no more"spigotandbunghole"inginuation8. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7—1 would state, for the infor- 
mation of the gentleman, that at the commencement 
of the financial year a contingent fund is set by for 
the use of the Common Council. That is about 
$3500 or $4000 this year. That fund can be expended 
in any way that the Common Council sees fit, wheth- 
er for badges or other legitimate expenses. 

Mr. Dacey of Ward 20 — Then so long as we have 
that fund we have the right to take the money or the 
badge, as we please, or to app-opriate it for a hat or 
a pair of boots. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7— No, sir, the money can be 
expended only by vote of the Council. 

The vote on tne amendment of Mr. Flynn, to make 
the price fifteen dollars, was taken, and the President 
declared that it appeared to be carried. The vote 
was doubted, and Mr. Barnes of Ward 11 called for 
the yeas and nays, which was not sustained— 10 for, 
51 against. 

The amendment of Mr. Flynn to the amendment 
of Mr. Kimball was then adopted — 49 for, 14 against— 
by a rising vote. 

The question was upon the adoption of the amend- 
ment as amended. 

Mr. Putnam of Ward 15 — Before we vote upon this 
question, I want to say one word in regard to the 
arguments which have been used in favor of having 
badges at all, or of having costly ones. The only 
gentlemen I have heard advance any argument in 
favor of badges are the gentlemen from Wards 5 
and 7, and the line of argument they have used is 
something in this vein: When the question of water 
came up, they said, ''Here is a chance for economy; 
this question of badges is a small matter." I think 
that principle is a very fallacious and mischievous 
one for us to adopt at the beginning of the 
municipal year. The question of extrava- 
gance is entirely independent of the amount ex- 
pended; it is dependent upon whether the thing 
voted for is desirable or not. The expense of eight 
or nine hundred dollars for a badge which is merely 
ornamental and not necessarv is extravagance. It is 
the principle involved. An expense of eight or nine 
millions, if it is necessary for the city, is a measure 
of economy. Now, in a week or two we have got to 
discuss this water question, for which we shall have 
to appropriate a great amount of money. Before we 
approach that question, our good faith ought to be 
expressed before the city in regard to financial matters. 
Although this five or six hundred dollars is a small 
amount, the principle is- wrong unless good reasons are 
given for having those badges at all. I think we over- 
estimate our importance. We are a les'islative body, 
but individually we have no authority, except that 
the Mayor issues a formal order appointing us special 
policemen. Our importance, individually, it seems 
to me, is very slight— at least most of us— and unless 
good reasons are given we ought to vote against 
them. I hope that no order for badges will prevail, 
and certainly not an order expending $15 for each 
badge. I think our constituents will have reason to 
lack confidence in our judgment in money matters, 
if we pass this order. 1 do not care what the amount 
will be; the principle of the thing is utterly wrong. 

The amendment as amended was adopted. 

The question being on the passage of the order, 
Mr. Putnam of Ward 15 called for the yeas and nays, 
and they were ordered— 13 for, 49 against, one-fifth 
having voted therefor. 

The order was passed, yeas 48, nays 20, as follows: 

Yeas— Messrs. Abbott, Barnes, Bent, Boardman, 
Brackett, Brown, Burditt, Burgess, Butler, Collins, 
Crowley. Cudworth, Cushman, Davis, Day, Dean, 
Flatley, Flynn, Gordon, Harrington, Hicks, Jennings, 
Kent, Leach, Long, Loriug, Martin, McCarty, 
Mooney, Morse, Noyes, Page, Pease, Powers, Pray, 
Shaw, Sibley, Smith, Swea,t, Thacher, Train, Wal- 
bridge, Warren, Weston, Whiston, E. P. Wilbur, 
Woods, Woodward — 48. 

Kays- Messrs. Adams. Barry, Be'il, Bearce, Caw- 
ley, Crocker, Dacey, Fuller, Goldthwait, Hine, Hun- 
newell, Kimball, Minot, Perkins, Putnam, Sprague, 
Sweetser, West, N. S. Wilbur, Willcutt— 20. 

Amotion to reconsider the last vote, made by Mr. 
Noyes of Ward 5, was lost. 

The President appointed Messrs. Davis of Ward 
14, Page of Ward 9, and Kimball of Ward 6 the com- 
mittee named in the order for badges. 



amm 



b^^dte^iAiiaiilMii 



36 



BOARD OF AJl^DEl^MEN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceeding's of the Board of Aldermen, 

FEBRUARY 3, 1874. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Alder 
men was held at lour o'clock P. M. today, Alderman 
Clark, Chairman, presiding. 

JUUORS DRAWN. 

Sixty-four traverse jurors for the Superior Court, 
January term, were drawn. 

EXECUTIVE NOMINATIONS CONFIRMED. 

Special Police Officers— Francis W. Hill, Fourth 
street. Baptist Church; Georae McGregor, Kennedy 
Hall, Koxbury; George Faulkner, Pond street, West 
Roxbury. 

BOND APPROVED. 

The bond of William G. Davies, constable, being 
duly certified, was approved 

ORDER or NOTICE. 

The order of notice on petition of George W. Sim- 
mons & Son, for leave to locate and use a steam en- 
gine and boiler at Oak Hall, North street, was con- 
sidered, and there being no objection the petition 
was recommitted to the Committee on Steam En- 
gines. 

INVITATION ACCEPTED. 

An invitation was received from N. P. Banks Vet- 
eran Corps, that the City Council attend a lecture in 
Charlestown. Accepted and sent down. 

SALE OF UNCLAIMED BAGGAGE. 

A petition was received from the Boston & Albany 
Railroad Company for the appointment of a commit- 
tee to examine atd authorize a sale of unclaimed 
baggage, consisting of six trunks, thirty-one travel- 
line bags, three valises, and a variety of miscel- 
laneous articles. Referred to a special committee 
consisting of Aldermen Stebbins and Bigelow. 

PETITIONS REFERRED. 

7'o the Committee on Armories. Co. K, First In- 
fantry, for an allowance for rent and repairs of 
armory at Washington Hall. 

Walter Everett. Colonel Fifth Infantry, for a room 
for the headquarters of said regiment. 

7o the Committee on Servers. Calvin W. Clark, for 
abatement of sewer assessment on Kingston street. 

J. F. Wilson et uL, for sewer m Dorchester street. 

To the Commiltee on Paving. J. Sturgis Potter, to 
place a shaft across Perkins street. 

W. H. Piper et al., that Lamartine street be graded 
and put in order. 

Alfred Lingham, to be paid for grade damages on 
Ruggles street. 

George B. Drake & Co., to maintain a hoisting 
beam over sidewalk at 98 Federal street. 

Charles Herman, for reimbursement in filling up 
Mechanics street. 

James Manary, for grade damages on P street. 

To the Co?nmittee on Licenses. Blanchard & Ross, 
for license for a variety theatre at 578 Washington 
street, in the St. James Theatre building. 

Jourdain »fe Co., to exhibit a museum of anatomy 
at 542 Washington street. 

To the Committee on Police Harding, Gray & 
Dewey, to project a sign at 16!l Congress street. 

Davis Bros. & Co., to project a sign from rear of 
73-75 High street. 

George F. Moore & Co., to project a sign from 
Federal street, corner of High street. 

7'o the Committee on Health on the part of the Board. 
Otis Eddy, to occupy wooden stable for two horses 
on Nelson street, near Norfolk street. 

J. B. Simpson, to occupy two wooden stables for 
four horses on Orchard street, north side. 

John Butland, to occupy a back stable for one 
horse on rear of H street, between Sixth and 
Seventh. 

Howard L. Hayford, to construct a cellar below 
grade at 16 Kneeland street. 

George Clark, Jr., to build a stable for three horses 
on Columbia street. 

Mark B. Mulvey, remonstrance against erection of 
a stable on Walden place. 

James A. Lappen et al., remonstrance against erec- 
tion of brick stable in rear of 190 H street. 

Michael Condon, to occupy wooden stable for one 
horse on First street. No. 487. 

James A. King, to occupy wooden stable for ten 
horses on Leonard street, VVard Ki. 

2'o the Committee on Claims. Lucy W. Hartshorn, 
for an allowance on account of the injury to, and 



death of her husband, Warren Hartshorn, from in 
juries alleged to have been received while in the 
service of the city. 

William Burns, for compensation for two horses 
furnished to the Boston Fire Department in 1873. 

To the Cmmnittee on Streets. George W. Clay pole, 
for abatement of assessment for betterment on Lin- 
coln street, Brighton street. 

To the Committee on Market. Lessees of Faneuil 
Hall Market, to be heard on the subject of their 
leases. 

To the .Joint Cwnmittee on Streets. Notice from 
Mitchell & Smith, of intention to dispute the right of 
the city to certain land in Eliot street. 

THE ELMS ON TREMONT STREET. 

Petitions were received from R. K. Potter et. al., 
and N. J. Bradlee et. al., for the removal of the trees 
on Tremont street, in front of the Granary Burying 
Ground. 

Alderman Cutter moved that the petitions be re- 
ferred to the Committee- on Common and Public 
Grounds. 

Alderman Worthington offered the following as a 
substitute : 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be, 
and he is hereby directed to cause the trees now 
standing in the sidewalk on Tremont street, between 
Park street and the Tremont House, to be removed 
forthwith. 

Alderman Cutter — The usual course has been to re- 
fer to the Committee on Common all petitions for the 
removal of a tree from any place. I trust that cus- 
tom will not be departed from in this case, and I 
move that the petitions and order be referred to that 
committee. 

The petitions and the order were so referred by a 
rising vote— six for, five against. 

THE EXPOSITION OF ARTS. 

A petition was received from the Massachusetts 
Charitable Mechanic Association for the use of 
Faneuil Hall for the twelfth triennial exhibition of 
mechanical arts, for eight weeks from the first day 
of September to the 30th of October next. The 
petitioners ask that they may be permitted to erect a 
temporary building on the driveway in Merchants' 
row, between Faneuil and Quincy halls; also to be 
allowed to erect a temporary platform and staircase 
on Market square, at the westerly end of Faneuil 
Hall, for the purpose of gaining greater facilities for- 
admission to the balls during the proposed exhibi- 
tion. They also request a hearing at an early date in 
explanation of the requests. The petition was 
referred to the Committee on Public Buildings. 

REPORTS or CITY OFFICERS. 

The following reports for the quarter ending Janu- 
ary 31 were received: 

SujKrintendent of Faneuil Ucdl Market. Cash re- 
ceived—for rent of stalls, $13,339 50; for cellars, 
$6920 25; permanent outside stands, $693 75; fees 
for weighing at market scales, $211 53; rent of stalls 
in new market, $3792; for cellars in do., $1899: India 
wharf market, $.346 87; Christmas stands paid for 
trees, $30 62. Total, $27,233 52: all of which has 
been paid into the treasury. The report was ordered 
placed on file. 

City Clerk. Cash received— for recording mort- 
gages, etc., $731; licenses for intelligence office, $4; 
for auctioneers, $66; billiard saloons, $1.58; use of 
Faneuil Hall in 1873, $86 96; sale of old ballots, etc., 
$3 52; record of goods found, $0 25. Total receipts, 
$1049 73; all of which has been paid to the City 
Treasurer. The report was sent down. 

The following abstract of the annual report of the 
City Registrar was received: 

The number of births registered in 1873 was 9659, 
an increase of 389 over the number recorded during 
the preceding year. Certificate of intentions of mar- 
riage issued in 1873 was 4549, an increase of 126 over 
the number issued iH 1872. There were 3883 mar- 
riages recorded during the same period ; 121 more 
than were registered during the preceding year. The 
number of deaths in 1873 was 7869, a decrease of 221. 
The usual detailed reports, with explanatory tables, 
will be submitted to the City Council at an early 
day. Tne report was sent down. 

SPECIAL ELECTION IN WARD THREE. 

Notice was received from the Speaker and Clerk of 
the House of Representatives, that by vote of the 
House, the seat of John Tewksbury, in said House, 
has been vacated, and Tuesday, the 10th day of Feb- 
ruary, appointed as the time for an election to fill 
said vacancy. The communication was placed on 
file. 

On motion of Alderman Stebbins— 

Ordered, That a warrant be issued for the meeting 
of the legal voters in Ward No. 3, in this city, on 
Tuesday, the 10th day of B'ebruary, at eleven o'clock 



FEBPtUAHY 2, 1874. 



37 



A. M., then and there to give in their ballots for one 
Eepret-entative to the present General Court from the 
Third District of Suffolk. The polls to be kept open 
till four o'clock P. M. 
Passed. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Orders to cancel the lease held by Thomas W. Car- 
ter of the buildings on a part of the City Hospital 
wharf, and to authorize the Committee on Public 
Lands to make a new lease to said Carter of build- 
ings and land (37,027 square feet), for a term of ei?ht 
years from January -1, 1874, for the sum of $3250, on 
certain condiiious. Passed. 

Order for Superintendent of Lamps to contract 
from time to time during this municipal year for 
lamp posts, brackets and other supplies and materials 
for his department. Passed. 

PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Petitions of F. Hunnewell, Daniel McDavitt, 
Company C, First Battalion Cavalry, Company G, 
Ninth Regiment, and remonstrance of J. A. Turner 
et al., severally referred in concurrence. 

Report (lea-e to withdraw) of Committee on 
Claims, on petition of William Hannon to be paid 
for persona! injuries caused by an alleged defect in 
highway on Meeting-House Hill. Accepted. 

Order authorizing the City Surveyor to purchase 
necessary supplies and material for his department. 
Passed. 

Order authorizing the Committee on Northampton- 
street District to exercise all the powers in relation 
to Suffolk-street District, which were conferred on 
the committee for 1873. Passed. 

Report from Committee On Streets recommending 
a reference to Board of Street Commissioners of the 
subject of extension of Parker street. The board 
concurred in the reference. 

Order for Committee on Water to consider the ex- 
pediency of connecting Farm Pond with Lake Co- 
chituate, and of building a conduit from said lake to 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir. Passed. 

Order for Committee on Water to consider the ex- 
pediency of adding to Mystic Pond a further supply 
of water by connecting said pond with Concord or 
other rivers. Passed. 

Report ef the Commissioner on Cambridge bridges. 
(City Doc. No. 16 ) Placed on file. 

Report and orders to allow |1200 for repairs on 
armory of Company D, First Battalion of Cavalry; 
S383 10, for repairs on armory of Company I, Ninth 
Regiment of Infantry; $250, for repairs on headquar- 
ters of First Battalion Light Artillery. Passed— 
yeas 12, nays 0. 

ELECTIONS OF CITY OFFICERS. 

Reports of committees nominating William H. 
Bradley for Superintendent of Sewers; Robert W. 
Hall, Supeiintendcnt of Public Lands; John Galvin, 
Superintendent of Common, etc. ; William F.Davis, 
Water Registrar: Charles Harris, Superintendent of 
Streets; James C. Tucker, Superintendent of Public 
Buildings; John P. Healy, City Solicitor; and Alvah 
H. Peters, City Messenger, came from the Common 
Council accepted. The Board concurred, and pro- 
ceeded to ballot for various city oflScers, with the fol- 
lowing result: 

City Messenger. Aldermen BigeloiV and Hall were 
appointed a committee to receive, sort and count the 
votes, and they reported that Alvah H. Peters had re- 
ceived twelve votes, and was unanimously elected on 
the part of the Board. 

City Solicitor. Aldermen Prescott and Brooks 
were appointed a committee to collect and count 
votes, and they reported as follows: 

Whole number of yotes Vi 

Necessary to a choice 7 

John P.Healy had 10 

G. A. Somerby 1 

Blank 1 

Mr. Healy was declared elected on the part of the 
Board. 

Superintendent of Public Builings. Alderman 
Emery and Cutter were appointed a committee to 
collect, sort and count votes. They reported that 
James C. Tucker had received twelve votes, and he 
was declared unanimously elected on the part of the 
Board. 

Superintendent of Streets. Aldermen Cutter and 
Worthineton were appointed a committee to collect 
and count votes. Tney reported that Charles Harris 
had received 12 votes ; and he was declared unani- 
mously elected on the part of the Board. 

Water Registrar. Aldermen Bigelow and Hall were 
appointed a committee to collect and count votes. 
They reported that William F. Davis had received 12 
votes, and he was declared unanimously elected on 
the part of the Board. 



Superintendent of Common and Public Grounds — 
Alderman Harris and Alderman Power were ap- 
pointed a committee to collect; and count votes, 
and they reported that J«hn Galviu had received 
twelve votes. He was declared unanimously elected 
on the part of the Board. 

Superintendent of Seivers — Aldermen Worthington 
and Emery were appointed a committee to collect 
and count votes, and they reported that William H. 
Bradley had received ten votes and there were two 
blanks. He was declared unanimously elected on 
thfi Dart of the Board 

Superintendent of Public Xa/irfs— Aldermen Emery 
and Peters were appouted a committee to collect and 
count votes, and they reported that Robert W. Hall 
had received twflve votes. He was declared unani- 
mously elected on the part of the Board. 

Clerk of Co?nmittees. Aldermen Stebbins and Har- 
ris were appointed a committee to collect and count 
votes, and they reported that James M. Bugbee had 
received twelve votes. He was declared unanimously 
elected on the part of the Board. 

City RegMrar. Aldermen Stebbius and Harris 
were appointed a committee to collect and count 
votes. They reported that N. A. Apollonio had re- 
ceived twelve votes, and he was declared elected on 
the part of the Board. 

Assessors of Taxes. Aldermen Stebbins and Power 
were appointed a committee to collect and count 
votes. They rei)orted as follows- 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a olioice 7 

Thomas Hills 11 

Ben.iainin Cuehlng 11 

Horace Smit h 10 

1 homas J. Bancroft 12 

DaBiel H. W hituey 8 

Benjamiu F. Palmer 7 

and Messrs. Hills, Cushing, Smith, Bancroft and 
Whitney were declared elected on the part of the 
Board. 

Alderman Stebbins, from the joint special com- 
mittee appointed to nominate a suitable candidate 
for Commissioner of Cedar Grove Cemetery, sub- 
mitted a report recommending the election of Albe 
C. Clark. The report was accepted a.id the Board 
proceeded to an election. Aldermen Worthington 
and Stebbins were appointed a committee to collect 
and count votes. They reported that Albe C. Clark 
had received twelve votes, and he was declared unani- 
mously elected on the part of the Board. 

smith's RIDING SCHOOL. 

On motion of Alderman Peters, the Board took up 
the special assignment for five o'clock, being Alder- 
man Power's motion to substitute, for Aldermaa 
Worthington's motion "leave to withdraw," on peti- 
tion of J. M. Smith, for a riding-school stable in rear 
of 1043 Washington street, an order granting leave to 
said Smith to erect such a stable of brick, for sixty- 
four hojses, etc. 

Alderman Worthington — When this subject came 
up last week, it was comparatively new to me. 1 had 
had but very little opportunity to investigate it, but 
since then I have been to the locality and have ob- 
tained some figures and facts which I think this Board 
of Aldermen should have before they vote upon the 
question now before us. As I stated at the last meet- 
ing, it is proposed to put this stable on a square 
formed by Washington and Groton streets, Shawmut 
avenue, Medford court, and Briggs's place. The lot 
fronts on Washington street, is 206 feet deep, and has 
109 feet on Briggs's place in the rear. It is proposed 
to put up a building 103 feet square, and 63 feet high, 
with four stories. That building will be placed as 
near to the adjacent buildings as it can be without 
disturbing the abutters' walls. On the sides the wall 
will be within 21 inches of the|abutters', and within 38 
feet of the brick buildings in front. On the front 
lot there is already a building five stories high, and 
sixty-five feet deep, and the passage from the front 
to the rear is by an archway eleven feet four inches 
in width. There will be two double windows in the 
basement story, fronting "n Briggs place; there are 
to be two double windows and a door on the first 
story, I think, and on the second and third stories 
there are two double windows, while on the fourth 
story there will be four large windows, running the 
whole length across. On each end there will be seven- 
ty-five windows, thirty of which will have small 
lights, and the remainder will be large windows, to 
be raised up and down. The front will be filled up 
with windows and doors. The question for us today 
is, to decide how great a nuisance a stable of this 
kind will be. That it is a nuisance is decided by the 
law, which says that no one shall erect a sta- 
ble or keep horses in a stable without get- 
ting a permit from the city. That fixes the fact 
that it is a nuisance, a disadvantage to the 



38 



B()A11D OF ALIJKRMKX 



neisfhborhood, that it dutcriorates the vahie of prop- 
erty, and that ii JH imhi-altliful. I fav it tixe!* that 
fact; olhiTwisc, why have thu hiwy Why not allow 
them to put liorses into any hiiililiiif;? Wliy inalte 
any law al)oiit itv So, the jxiiiit l)ciii{^ settled, ihat 
it is a nuisance, and that it does deteriorate the 
value of property, it is for us to decide how much 
of a unisance it i^'. Von will l)ear in mind that on 
each side, within twenty inches of tlie ahntters, 
there are two Muall stahles, and I cannot c imieive of 
a greater nuisance to the abutters than that. It 
seems to me that that alone is sutlicient rea- 
son for this Board to say that a stable shall 
DOt be put into that building. I understand 
that t'ue huildiuiT can be built, but this Board 
should say that horiies shall not he put into a 
stable so near to dwelling houses as these are. Ke- 
member, sir, that when once a permit is given, that 
after the horses get into this ftable, they will tell 
you that they can do as they have a mind to, so long 
as they do not make such a nuisance that the Board 
of Health will tell them to remove it. What are the 
facts in this case? There are the small stables which 
are full now. The petitioner comes here and says 
that unless we allow him to put all his horses into 
the new building, he will put them into the small 
brick stable. Instead of tnat small stable, do you 
propose to allow him to have a large stable, about a 
hundred feet square, in which he intends to put six- 
ty-four horses, and then to come here and say, "I 
want 128 horses, or l.^S;— I have sixty-four now, 
what are the objections to the remainder?" The 
Board would be very likely to say they do not see any 
objection to having the remainder. He has just 
got them there and we cannot help it. Now, sir, 
the question is as to the amount of nuisance or 
damage to the neighborhood. That it is a nuisance, 
no one will, I think, for a moment question. The 
amount of nuisance is for us to decide. That I might 
more easily decide the question. I went to a gentle- 
man at the South End, who owns a large amount of 
real estate, and asked him if we allowed tne Brig- 
ham hwirs to build a stable there, as they proposed, 
would it be a disadvantage to the neighborhood, to the 
dwelling houses, and he responded at ouce, "To 
some of the houses it would be a damage of fifty per 
cent., to all of them, twenty-five per cent." I then 
asked another gentleman, who is a hi'-ge real estate 
buyer and seller, what the damage would be, 
and he responded at once, "twenty-five per 
cent." I then called upon one of the asses- 
sors of the city, who is a dealer in real es- 
tate, and an auctioneer, and asked him how much 
damace it would cause to place a stable in that vicin- 
ity. His response, at once, was, "I cannot sell a 
house in the immediate vicinity of a stable for twen- 
ty-five per cent, of what it would bring if it were 
clear away from anything like a stable." After 
learning this, I have made up my mind that this sta- 
ble would beat least a damage of twenty five per 
cent, to the houses in the vicinity. This board must 
bear in mind that the gentlemen who live in these 
houses are mostly of the middle class who are able to 
buy houses worth only from ?ix to seven thousand 
dollars, and then, by mortgaging it back for a large 
portion of the purchase money ; that they have lived 
there for the last twenty-five years; that some 
have quite a number of children, and that they 
cannot afford to sell their houses and go some- 
where else, as if they were of the richer clasees. 
They are of the class which we are called upon 
to protect from nuisances. I never trouble my- 
self about a rich man, for he can take care of him- 
self. Any man who has got money ennugh can take 
care of himself, but one who has labored from day te 
day is the man we are called upon to protect in his 
rights. It is the duty of this Board to protect him. 
Those are the men who live in these narrow courts 
and streets; they come to us and ask us to protect 
their property. They will be obliged to sell at a sac- 
rifice, or move away, or risk the health of their wives 
and children. I wish to call your attention to the 
effect that this stable will have upon this property, so 
far as the city is concerned. The whole amount tax- 
ed upon this property in the square, between Wash- 
ington street and the other streets named, is $4.50,91)0; 
of this amount $100,000 are taxed to the Brigham 
heirs, and there are 10,700 feet of land, with the stores 
in front. The 10.900 feet in the rear lot is taxed al 
$1 50 a foot, or $10,400 for the entire land that it is 
proposed to build this stable upon. The buildings 
are now taxed for five thousand dollars. Now, sir, 
you deduct from that the four houses on Washington 
street, that will not be damaged so much as those in 
the rear, and you have $248,900 of property that will 
be damaged twenty-five per cent.— so that the dam- 
age to the taxable property in this immediate 
vicinity will be $62,22.5. I think we need go no 
further than that, and say that the interest of the 



city demands that we shall not allow horses to go 
into this place. There is one tiling more that I 
want to call the attention of the Board to, and it is in 
response to what the Alderman said on last .Monday 
in regard to tlie petitioners. He read to you the 
names of the ladies who petitioned in aid of this 
stable. I have looked to see where these ladies live 
who are so interested to have a riding school. I will 
read to you the location of their residences — 
Pinckney street, Beacon, Walnut, Chestnut, 
Mount Vejnon, Brimmer. West Cedar, Arling- 
ton, Berkeley, Newbury and Boylston streets. Com- 
monwealth avenue, Ashburtou place, Chester square, 
and Hancock street. But one of these petitioners 
lives within a mile of this stable — pure, disinter- 
ested friendship for Mr. Smith! Ana there is not 
one of those ladies, who, if you had a^ked to put a 
stable within a thousand feet of her house, would 
have scorned you. Now, sir, in retjard to the gen- 
tlemen who are petitioners, it if precisely the same; 
there is hardly one who is within a mile of this 
place. They are on Beacon and Arlington streets, — 
and the places of residence arc given in the same 
way through the petiti(m— these petitioners all live 
quite a distance from where the stable is -not less 
than a mile. Now, sir, I have here the remon- 
strances of two hundred residents of the vicinity. 

Alderman Power — I would ask whether these re- 
monstrances were ever presented to the present City 
Government. 

Alderman W^orthingtou— They were presented to 
the committee and were considered by them. 

Alderman Power— I would ask whether they can 
properly be brought before the Board now. 

The Chairman — The remonstrances are not before 
the Board, and are not a proper subject for argument 
except by unanimous consent. 

Alderman Worthington— I wanted to say that there 
are 296 remonstrants, and some of the letters are 
painful tf read. For instance, one man says, "I have 
a wife and five children; I should be obliged to move 
out of the house if the stable comes in here; 
I should be afraid to remain here, for fear 
of the health of my children." Dr. John Flint of 
No. 1 Union Park, says, "I coincide with the views 
[of the remonstrants], and am satisfied that a stable 
located in such proximity to the dwelling tiouses in 
Briggs place and Medford court, would be a serious 
injury to the health of those dwelling in these 
courts." Here is, a'so, a remonstrance from the 
occupants of Williams Market, and there are many 
others of like tenor. I do not know that I have any- 
thing more to say, but to hope that this substitut« 
order should not pass, because I think it would be a 
serious disadvantage to the city for taxable property, 
and a detriment to the large number of people living 
in that section. We should protect them, just as is 
provided for by this very law. The have no course 
left but to come here and claim protection for them- 
selves, their wives and their children. I think we 
should refuse to pass this substitute order. 

Alderman Power — If one fortieth part is true of 
what the Alderman wishes to convey, I do not see 
how any of us ever reached the age which permits us 
to occupy these chairs, for I believe quite a number 
of us have had a little something to do with a farm, 
or were born and brought up in the neighborhood of 
stables, and I do not see how we have lived beyond 
infancy if the effect of stables is so bad as he would 
have us believe. Now, the Alderman says, here is a 
question for us to settle. I take his entire argument 
and I say it is the best that can be made in favor of 
the erection of this stable there. He says the whoje 
property is assessed at $400,000, of which the heirs 
of William Brigham own one-quarter. Now, who is 
to suffer? Whatever the dam ige will be, William 
Brigham's heirs will suffer one-fourth of the 
whole. Yet, the gentleman says, that should settle 
the question. He believes ttiat the heirs of 
William Brigham have a love for money just as much 
as men of business geutrally have; and would not 
they be the last to do anything to injure their prop- 
erty? Are they going, wilfully, to sacrifice twenty- 
five per cent, of their properly? Why, sir, it is the 
very best argument in the world why they should be 
permitted to have this stable there. But the gentle- 
man, with his very limited knowledge of city affairs, 
says the fact that they have to cotne here to get a 
permit is proof that it is a nuisance. Why, a man 
cannot build a woodshed without coming here to get 
a permit. He has stated the places where those 
ladies live; well, there is no place in the city where 
stables are thicker than on Beacon street, aud yet 
land is $12 a foot. This is too good a place for resi- 
dences, and they must give way for buriness. I 
would not vote for or tolerate a stable there did I not 
feel certain that the laud is worth more for business, 
and I did not think the people owning property there 
would be greatly benefited pecuniarily. Now, as I 



F i: B R U A R Y 



1 ®7'4 



39 



have said, a first-class ustablishment of this kind is 
just as much a ne;essity in the community as dwell- 
ings, and I say it will tend to enhance the value of 
the property there. And no better argument can be 
used than the mere fact that the heirs of William 
Krigham own a hundred thousand dollars' worth of 
property there, and they certainly cannot wish to do 
anything that will injure their property. The Alder- 
man has no right to assume what the petitioner may 
do after he obtains this permit; he has no right to go 
beyond this petition. There is a stable there now in 
which he has the privilege of keeping more horses 
than the number named in the petition. They pro- 
pose to build a first-class stable there, with all the 
modern improvements, and to take the horses out 
of this old structure and put them into the new one. 
They have got their stables already and can keep 
their horses there. They have that right, and the 
City Solicitor has informed this Board that when 
they have that right already, it cannot be taken away 
unless they are proven to be a nuisance. The neigh- 
bors have not yet proved the stables to be a nuisance. 
In regard to the remonstrants to whom the Alderman 
has refeired, I suppose it is known to this Beard that 
the owners of that land have been trying for years to 
get permission to put up a new building there. The 
owners of this property have made up their minds 
that residences will not pay them so well as a build- 
ing constructed for business purposes. They 
have repeatedly tried to get permission to erect 
a building for mechanical purposes, but th« 
owners of adjacent property have come here 
and remonstrated against everything that has 
been attempted. So it seems to me that it has got to 
be a sort of persecution. The owners of land about 
there have always had light and air, and they know 
that, anything that is built there will shut out the 
light. If a dwelling house is built, that will doit. 
The Alderman stated that the building was to be 
sixty feet in height, when it is to be not over fifty 
feet. 

Alderman Worthington— I wish to correct the Al- 
derman. I had the statement from the architect that 
the plans had been changed, and that the building is 
to be sixty feet in height. 

Alderman Power — I presume it is no use to waste 
time. Members of this Board have been on the 
ground and have made up their minds as to the pro- 
priety ol granting or refusing the prayer of the peti- 
tioners. I suppose that they all understand the 
condition of the premises and the existence of the 
stables, and I hope that most of them have seen the 
plans of the building that is proposed to be put 
there. I shall therefore take up no further time up- 
on the subject. I hope the order granting the prayer 
of the petitioner will pass. 

Alderman Cutter called far the yeas and nays, and 
they were ordered. 

The vote w^as taken on Alderman Power's substi- 
tute order granting the prayer of the petitioners, and 
it was lost — yeas 5, nays 7, as follows: 

Yeas — Aldermen Clark, Cutter, Emery, Peters, 
Power— 5. 

Nays— Aldermen Bigelow, Brooks, Hall, Harris, 
Prescott, Stebbins, Worthington— 7. 

The question recurred on Alderman w orthington's 
motion that the petitioner have leave to withdraw. 

On motion of Alderman Prescott the yeas and 
nays weie ordered, and the motion prevailed— 8 for, 
4 against, as follows: 

Yeas— Aldermen Bigelow, Brooks, Hall, Harris, 
Peters, Prescott, Stebbins, Worthington— 8. 

Nays— Aldermen Clark, Cutter, Emery, Power — J. 

KEPORTS AND ORDERS. 

Alderman Cutter submitted a report from the Com- 
mittee on Police on the petitions of J. & H. K. Os- 
born et al., for the repeal of the order passed Jan. 19, 
1874, for the removal of projecting signs on the 
"Burnt District," and the petition of Lewis, Brown 
& Co., ef. al., for a strict enforcement of the order. 
The committee, having given a full hearing to the 
petitioners on both sides of the question, and having 
fully considered the subject, would recommend that 
the petitioners for the repeal of the order have leave 
to withdraw. Accepted. 

Alderman Brooks, from the Joint Committee on 
Survey and Inspection of Buildings, reported an 
order authorizing the granting of a permit to the 
Boston Gaslight Company to build a coal elevator on 
their wharf on Commercial street, according to their 
petition referred to said committee, and an applica- 
tion on file in the office of the Department for the 
Survey and Inspection of Buildings. The order was 
passed. 

Alderman Emery submitted a report from the Joint 

Committee on Public Buildings, on the requests of 

he Board of Health and the Inspector of Buildings, 



for additional office room. The committee find not 
only the departments named in want of more room, 
but others in the City Hall in a like situation. In 
order that the committee may have some comprehen- 
sive plan of action upon which all the departments 
seeking relief may be accommodated, they recom-. 
mend the passage of the accompanying order: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Buildings 
be authorized to consider >'.nd report some plan for 
the relief of the various departments now occupying 
City Hall, and requiring more room and facilities for 
city business. 

Passed. 

On motion of Alderman Hams— 

Whereas, The City Council of Charlestown passed 
an order, Dec. 22, 1873, to pay the members of the 
police of that city the amounts which they paid for 
their badges when they return them, and to carry 
into effect said order, it is hereby 

Ordered, That the Auditor of Accounts allow for 
payment the amount necessary to accomplish the 
requirements of said order of the late City Council 
of Charlestown, upon the delivery to him of the 
aforesaid badges, and that the Auditor of Accounts 
place the badges received by him in the^charge^of^the 
Chief-of-Police— said amount to be charged to the 
appropriation for Police. 

Read once. 

Ordered, That the compensation of the officers 
designated to attend the sittings of the Municipal 
Court for the Charlestown District, and serve such 
processes, precepts and orders as may be committed 
to them, be fixed at the rate of twelve hundred dol- 
lars per annum, beginning at the date of their ap- 
pointment. 

Alderman Harris— This, order is submitted from 
the fact that the Judge there has designated three 
offlcers which seems to be essential for the enforce- 
ment of the order of the court. This matter has 
been considered by the committee, and althouijh it is 
$600 more than the officers of the Southern District 
at the Highlands have, nevertheless we think it is 
sufficient work for the money. There is a different 
class of people there, and there are more of them. 

Alderman Cutter — I would inquire whether it is 
any increase from what the city of Charlestown 
paid. 

Aiderman Harris— It comes under another law. 
The officers there were provided for by Middlesex 
County, and I don't think the city of Charlestown 
wag ever called upon to pay anything for them. 

On motion of Alderman Peters the order was laid 
over for one week. 

On (notion of Alderman Harris- 
Ordered, That until the first day of May next, all 
expenses arising from the care and superintendence 
of the Maiden Bridge, including the lighting of the 
lamps thereon, be paid from the funds now in the 
hands of Linus E. Pearson (late City Treafurer of 
Charlestown), which are held by him for such pur- 
poses, whenever bills therefor shall be presented to 
him properly allowed and certified by the Auditor of 
Accounts of this city. 

Alderman Stebbins asked why the first of May was 
specially named in the order. 

Alderman Harris— I understand that the financial 
year expires on the ;30th of April. The late Treasurer 
of Charlestown has a trust fund on hand for this 
bridge, and it is intended to pay for these repairs out 
of that fund, by which the city treasury will be re- 
lieved so much. 

The order was passed. 

Alderman Emery, from the Committee on County 
Buildings, submitted a report on the petition of 
members of the Social Law Library for the use of 
an additional room in the Court House. The com- 
mittee find that the room desired has been assigned 
for other purposes, and they therefore report that 
action at present is inexpedient. Accepted. 

Alderman Bigelow, from the Committee on Li- 
censes, reported in favor of granting the applications 
of Thomas P. Drohan, to give concert at Wait's Hall, 
February 17; P. Connolly «<«/., for transfer of wagon 
licenses; George R. Presby, for hack stand a' corner 
of Franklin and Congress streets; Jacob Geib, for a 
billiard license at corner of Stoughtou and Hudson 
streets. Ward 16; E. V. S. Williamson, for licen»e as 
an auctioneer at 79:3 Washington street; William B. 
Haynes, for transfer of hack license; John Harrison, 
for pawnbroker's license at No. 1 Garland street; 
M. Stalkowski, for pawnbroker's license at 19:31 Wash- 
ington street; Myer Abrahams, for pawnbroker's 
license at 18 Salem street; F. Kolbach, 12 Oak street, 
C. L. Belier, 18 Hayward place, and Daniel Connolly, 
379 Hanover street, for victualler's license; Jobs 
Pay, 1592 Washington street, and F. S. Wright. City 
Point, for innholder's license. Severally accepted. 

Alderman Bigelow, from the same committee, re- 
ported leave to withdraw on applicatien of M. H. 



40 



BOAPfD OF AL13EKMEN 



Farnnm, Rirer street, Mattapan, for Tictualler's 
license. Accepted. 

On motion of Alderman PieBcott— 
Ordered, That the Committee on Public Building! 
be authorized to funiith additional temporary accorn- 
modationB for the Lewis School; the expense to be 
charged to the appropriation for Schoolhousee, Pub- 
lic Buildings 
Passed. 

Alderman Prescott. from the Committee on Mar- 
kets, rei)orted in favor of granting the application of 
George W. Squire for leave to transfer to Edward D. 
Kimball one-half of lease of stalls Nos. 37 and 39 and 
cellar No. 7 in Faneuil Hall Market. 
Accepted. 

Alderman Harris, from the Committee on Streeti, 
reported on the petition of Joseph Nicliergon to be 
paid for land taken to widen Heath street, that as the 
records of the former city of Roxbury show the land 
referred to as taken into Heath street to have beea 
no pan of the petitioner's property, action on th« 
petition is unnecessary. Accepted. 
On motion of Alderman Harris, 
Ordered, That the order of this Board, dated Feb- 
ruary 10, 1873, to pay T. H. Parker and others 
$5523 35, for land taken and all damages occasioned 
by the Street Commissioners widening of Blue Hill 
avenue of December 11, 1872, be and the same hereby 
18 rescinded, the claim having been entered and set- 
tled in court. 
Passed. 

Alderman Harris, from the Committee on Streets, 
submitted orders to pay for street damages, as fol- 
lows: 

Edward E. Salisbury, $104,000, widening of Wash- 
ington and Summer streets. 

John B. Alley, $210, widening Seaverns avenue by 
the town of West Roxbury. 

Rt. Rev. John J. Williams, $3163 76, widening Har- 
rison avenue. 

William Miuot, trustee, $5589, widening Federal 
street. 

Heirs Nathaniel Snow, $5980, widening Federal 
Btreet. 
Severally passed. 

Alderman Worthington, from the Committee on 
Health, reported in favor of granting the petitions of 
Joshua Benson, Hiram Johnson, John Thomas, S. S. 
Siddell, and C. Menslage, to occupy stables; and 
leave to withdraw on petition of William H. Bennett 
for same. Severally accepted. 
On motion of Alderman Stebbins— 
Ordered. That the members of this Board appoint- 
ed to constitute the Committee on Cemeteries be ap- 
pointed the Committee on the City Registrar's De- 
partment. 

Alderman Stebbins— After a careful examination of 
the ordinance establishing a Board of Health, the 
Auditor of Accounts is of the opinion that the matter 
of burials properly belongs to that board, and this 
order is offered in view of that opinion. 
The order was passed. 
On motion of Alderman Stebbins — 
Ordered, That the rules and orders oi the Board of 
Aldermen be, and they are hereby amended by strik- 
ing out so much of section twenty-three as provides 
for the appointment of a committee on cemeteries, 
and insert in place thereof "a committee on the City 
Registrar's Department, 
Passed. 

Ordered, That the Joint Standing Committee on 
Mount Hope Cemetery be appointed to act as a 
standing committee on Cedar Grove Cemetery. 

Alderman Stebbins— At present there is no com- 
mittee to look after the affairs of Cedar Grove Cem- 
etery, and it was thought that the Committee on 
Mount Hope Cemetery should have the power to do 
so. 
The order was passed. 
On motion of Alderman Stebbins — 
Ordered, That the lot of land, together with the 
buildings thereon standing, and known as the Poor 
House Farm, in Ward 19, be and the same is hereby 
placed in charge of the Committee on Public Lands. 
Alderman Stebbins— In connection with this order 
1 would state that this piece of property is in no- 
body's charge now. A party is occupying the house, 
but nobody has charge of the land. 
The order was passed. 
On motion of Alderman Hall— 
- Ordered, That the petition of James McLaughlin 
and others, for the raising of the grade of portions 
of East Dedham and Hamburg streets, be taken from 
the flies of 1870, and referred to the Committee on 
Paving. 
Passed. 

On motion of Alderman Power- 
Ordered, That $26 41 be refunded. to Warren Lin- 
coln, on account of erroneous assessment for sewer 



in Prescott street; also, that $35 02 be abated from 
Arioch Wentworth, for a sewer in Buckingham 
street, and the same amount be assessed upon Ar- 
nold D F. Brown; also, that $38 42 be abated from 
Francis M. Harlnett for a sewer in Summer street, 
and the same amount assessed upon James M. Bar- 
nard; also, that $207 63 be abated from Albert T. 
Stearns for a sewer on Walnut street. 
Passed. 

CITY PROPERTT IN WARD NINETEEN. 

Alderman Emery, from the Joint Committee on 
Public Buildings, who were ordered by the City 
Council to inquire into the manner in which the 
building known as Wilson's Hotel, in Ward 19, is 
occupied; also as to the expediency of selling tke 
same, reported that they found that the building is 
occupied at present as a hotel, the proprietor being a 
tenant at will. 

The committee do not deem the sale of the land or 
buildings at present expedient from the fact that 
there is a probability that the stable will be required 
for the accommodation of the Health and Paving de- 
partments, and a portion of the hotel building for 
the use of the Police Department; also, there are 
street improvements and extensions of the same in 
progress in that neighborhood which contemplate 
the taking of a portion of the land contained in the 
hotel lot. The committee recommended the closing 
of the hotel forthwith, as set forth in the accompa- 
nying order: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Buildings 
be authorized to notify the present oecupant of the 
city building known as Wilson's Hotel, Ward 19, to 
vacate said premises on or before the first day of 
April, 1874. 

Alderman Worthington — I would like to inquire 
whether it is not in the power of this Board to close 
that hotel before the first day of April. 

Alderman Emery — In answer to the Alderman I 
would state that it is generally considered that when 
parties pay their rent monthly they are obliged to 
have a month's notice from the time when they pay 
their rent. That is the general rule, but there are 
exceptional cases where the title to property changes; 
then the occupants would at once become subject to 
removal without any notice; I have taken no legal 
advice on the suljject, but those were the views of 
the committee as expressed in the order. 

Alderman Worthington — I wish there were some 
way of doing it before that time. The city of Bos- 
ton is in possession of property where the law is vio- 
lated every hour in the day. Our police should close 
it at once. We should endeavor to find same way or 
other to close up that place, though I don't know 
how it can be done. I think it would be better to 
lay the order upon the table for one week. 

Alderman Peters— There is nothing from the com- 
mittee to show that there is a bar kept in the hotel. 
I do not think the question of a bar being there is 
before this Board. 

Alderman Power — I do not see the necessity of this 
extraordinary zeal just now in the cause of temper- 
ance, for the city has allowed the sale of liquor in 
other places as well as this. It is a well-known fact 
that there are bar rooms in (^uincy Hall Market, 
where liquor is sold every day in the week. 

Alderman Harris— Do I understand the gentleman 
to say liquor is sold in Quincy Market? 

Alderman Power— Yes, sir, I do. Why this 
haste to turn Mr. Wilson out? He is just as 
good as any other man. I think he has been consid- 
ered a good citizen in Brighton, and has conformed 
to the laws as well as other good citizens there. I 
do not see why ho should not be treated fairly, and 
have a reasonable time to give him a chance to moTC 
his goods out of the house. Furthermore, if he pays 
his rent monthly he cannot be put out. 

Alderman Worthington — I have said nothing 
against Mr. Wilson; but he is selling liquor anu 
breaking the law every hour in the day. I am per- 
fectly willing that he should remain there till the 
first of April, if he will stop breaking the law. and 
bringing disgrace upon the city. Look at the position 
we are placed in. We are liable to an indictment 
any day by the grand jury for breaking this law. We 
should stop breaking the law, and if there is a place 
m Fanueil Hall where the law is broken, I will pledge 
myself to go after it. This is a burning disgrace to 
the city of Boston 

Alderman Emery — The committee were under the 
apprehension at the time they made their exami- 
nation, and also when they made their report 
that it would be necessary to give the party keeping 
the place such time as the law required. I appre- 
hend that if he pays his rent monthly, and the city 
or the authorities from whom he hired, accepts it, he 
would be entitled to that length of time before he 
could be turned out. It naay b'e that there has been 
a change of title, that would make him a trespasser. 



FEBRUARY 3, 1874.. 



41 



T am well aware that where property is transferred 
from one party to another, the occupant can be put 
out without any notice at all. In this case we con- 
cluded that he was entitled to the regular notice, and 
that was recommended. If we can make the time 
shorter I have no objection. 

Alderman Cutter— I am in the habit of doing the 
city's business just as I attend to my own private 
affairs. The gentleman from the Highland Ward 
seems to know what kind of business is done there. 
I do not. If I owned the place, and should try tt» get 
him out, I should treat him with some courtesy. He 
can be indicted, but so long at, he is not indicted we 
can treat him with courtesy. I think the report of 
the committee is a very fair one. It is of no use to 
treat a man discourteously. 

Alderman Peters— I agree with Alderman Cutter. 
This liquor question has been brought before this 
Board only by the heart-broken confessions of the 
gentleman on my right. I don't know why the pro- 
prietor should be treated discourteously. 

Alderman Worthinaton— I would like to ask the 
gentleman if he would let a building for the sale of 
liquor. I assume that the city of Boston is a land- 
lord with tenants breaking the law every hour in the 
day. 

Alderman Cutter— I have some twelve stores in this 
city, and I do not let any of them for the sale of 
liquor. I let them for a less rent than I would if I 
let them for the sale of liquor. If I were the city of 
Boston I would not let a place for the sale of liquor. 
I do not know of any place where the law is broKen 
every hour in the day. 

Alderman Power- 1 stated that they were selling 
liquor in Quincy Hall Market. I believe that ale and 
cider are just as much restricted by the law as whiskey 
and gin. Therefore I class it as breaking the law to 
sell ale or cider just as much as the selling of whiskey 
or gin. They sell both ale and cider in Quincy Hall 
Market. 

The order was passed. 

BEQUESTS FOR ADDITIONAt, APPROPRIATIONS. 

Alderman Brooks submitted the following: 
The Joint Standing Committee on the Survey and 
Inspection of Buildings respectfully represent that 
an additional appropriation of three thousand three 
hundred dollars will be required to meet the expenses 
of the department for the remainder of the financial 



year. The following statement will show the nature 
of the expenditures to date: Salaries, $12,2.')0; 
printing, stationery and advertising, $1159 96; fares 
and tolls. $389 41; taking down unsafe walls after 
fire of May .30, $744 49; examination of buildings 
with relation to fire escapes, $997 50; horse keeping 
and repairs of vehicle, harnets. etc., $683 37; signs 
for uni^afe buildings, $42 75; maps, plans and sur- 
veyor's fees, $201; expenses of committee, $457 10: 
total, $16,925 58. Appropriation, $16,800; deficiency, 
$125 58. The following expenditures were not esti- 
mated for and included in the annual appropriation: 
Examination of buildings with relation to fire es- 
capes, made by order of the City Council, $997 50; 
taking down unsafe walls after fire of May 30, $744 49; 
maps, plans, signs and surveyor's fees, $243 75; ex- 
tra clerical assistance, $450; exchanging horse, $100; 
printing digest of laws and ordinance, and extra print- 
ing occasioned by alteration in Building law, $.349 35; 
expense of committee, $457 10- total, $3,342 19. 
Your committee would, therefore, respectfully ask 
for an additional appropriation of three thousand 
three hundred dollars, to meet the expenses of the 
department for the remainder of the financial year. 

Referred to the Committee on Finance. 

Alderman Power presented the following: 

To the Honorable the City Council of Boston— The 
Board of Directors for Public Institutions respect- 
fully request that an additional appropriation of ten 
thousand dollars be made to defray the ordinary ex- 
penses of the House of Correction for the remainder 
of the year. During the past summer, owing to a 
change in one ef the contracts for labor of prisoners, 
it became necessary to purchase an additional num- 
ber of sewing machines for the proper employment 
of the prisoners, at a cost of five thousand dollars. 
The average number of prisoners in the institution 
since May 1, 1873, has been 513 against an average of 
406 for the previous financial year, being an increase 
of 27 per cent. The increased cost of subsistence 
alone for this enlarged number has been $6600, and 
this amount, together with the cost of the sewing 
machines, has so far reduced the appropriation as to 
render necessary this request for an additional ap- 
propriatioo. Respectfully, 

„ ^ J. P. Bradlek, President. 

Referred to Committee on Finance. 

On motion of Alderman Power the Board ad- 
journed. 



COMMON OOXJNOIL. 



42 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

FEBRUARY 5, 1874. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common Coun- 
cil was held at half-past seven o'clock P.M., E. O. 
Shepard of Ward 4. President, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Petitions of Lucy Hartshorn, William Burns, Wal- 
ter Everett (Colonel Fifth Infantry), and Company 
K, First Infantry, and notice from Mitchell & Smith, 
severally referred ; and invitation from N. P. Banks 
Veteran Corps, to attend a lecture, accepted, in con- 
currence. 

Order for the Boston Gas Light Company to be 
anthorized to build a coal elevator upon their wharf 
on Commercial street. Passed. 

Order authorizing additional temporary accommo- 
dations to be provided for the Lewis School. 

Mr. West of Ward 16— As these accommodations 
are needed immediately for a grammar class just pro- 
moted from the primary schools, I move a gnspen- 
sion of the rules that the order may take its second 
reading. 

The rules were suspended — 41 for, against, and 
the order was passed. 

Order that the Committee on Mount Hope Ceme- 
tery be appointed to act as a standing committee on 
Cedar Grove Cemetery. Passed. 

Order placing the Poorhouse Farm in Ward 19 in 
charge of the Committee on Public Lands. Passed. 

Order for the Commttee on Public Buildings to re- 
port a plan for the relief of the various departments 
requiring more room and facilities for city business. 
Passed. 

Orders to cancel the lease held by Thomas W. Carter 
of the buildings on a part of the City Hospital Wharf, 
and to authorize the Committee of Public Lands to 
make a new lease to said Carter of buildings audland 
(37,027 square feet), for a term of eight years from 
January 1, 1874, for the sum of $3250 per annum, on 
certain conditions. Passed. 

Requests of the Directors of Public Institutions and 
the Joint Standing Committee on Survey and Inspec- , 
tion of Buildings for additional appropriations, sever- 
ally referred to the Committee on Finance. 

ELECTIONS OF CITT OFFICERS. 

Certificates were received from the Board of Alder- 
men of the election by that Board of a City Messen- 
ger, Superintendent of Public Buildings, Clerk of 
Committees, Assessors, City Solicitor, Sucerintend- 
ent of Streets, City Registrar, Superintendent of 
Sewers, Superintendent of Common and Public 
Grounds, Water Registrar and Superintendent of 
Public Lands, and on motion the Council proceeded 
to an election for each of the officers named, with 
the following result: 

City Messenger. Committee to Collect and Count 
Votes— Messrs. Thacher of Ward 15, Day of iVard 1 
and Jennings of Ward 5. 

Whole number of votes 58 

Necessary to a choice 30 

Alvah H. Peters had 58 

and he was declared elected, in concurrence. 

Superintendent of Public Bvildings. Committee to 
collect and count votes: Messrs. Pease of Ward 1, 
Cawley of Ward 2, and Leach of Ward 10. 

Wliole number of votes 58 

Necessary to a choice 30 

James C. Tucker had 54 

George A. Shaw 1 

Jonas Smith 1 

Blank 2 

and James C. Tucker was declared elected in con- 
currence. 

Cleric of Committees. Committee to collect and 
count votes: Messrs. Cudworth of Ward 11, Warren 
of Ward 12, Whiston of Ward 8. 

Whole number of votes 55 

Necessary to a choice 28 

James M. Bugbee had 54 

John Jones : 1 

and James M. Bugbee was declared elected in con- 
currence. 

Assessors. Pending a motion to suspend the rules 
and proceed to an election for Assessors by Mr. Har- 
rington of Ward 8, Mr. Crowley of Ward 7 asked 
leave to introduce an order. 

The President— The Chair would remind the gen tle- 
rnan he is out of order, inasmuch as the rule estab- 
lished by the Common Council requires that only 
papers from the Board of Aldermen should be consid- 
ered at the present time. 



Mr. Crowley of Ward 7— As that order has some- 
thing in relation to the assessments of last year, I 
desire that the Council should hear it read. I there- 
fore move a suspension of the rules that the order 
may be introduced. 

The President put the question, and it appeared 
that a quorum had not voted. 

Mr. Pease of Ward 1— I would like to have the 
order read, that the Council may. know whether it is 
proper to be introduced. 

The President read as follows: 

Ordered, That the City Surveyor be requested to 
measure and survey all the real estate now «wned by 
the Boston Wharf Corporation, so called, and report 
the same to this Council. 

The Council refused to suspend the rules and allow 
the order to be introduced— for, 37 against, and the 
election was ordered. 

Messrs, Harrington of Ward 8, Thacher of Ward 
15, and Sprague of Ward 4, were appointed a com- 
mittee to collect and count votes: 

Whole number of votes 62 

Necessary to a choice 32 

Thomas Hill had 59 

Benjamin Gushing 58 

Horace Smith 43 

Thomas J.Bancroft 59 

Daniel H. Whitney , 45 

Benjamin F. Palmer 30 

Edward F. Robinson 8 

[There was one ballot bearing six names which was 
not counted.] 

And Messrs. Hill, Gushing, Smith, Bancroft and 
W hitney were declared elected. 

City Solicitor. Committee to collect and count 
votes— Messrs. Kimball of Ward 6, Brackett of Ward 
10 and Minot of Ward 17. 

Whole number of votes 60 

Necessary to a choice 31 

John P. Healy had 53 

John W. Mahan 3 

G. A. Somerby 2 

George A. Shaw 1 

[There was one ballot for City Registrar which was 
not counted.] 
John P. Healy was declared elected. 
Superintendent of Streets. Committee to collect 
and count votes— Messrs. Wilbur of Ward 9, Shaw of 
Ward 5 and Long of Ward 22. 

Whole number of votes ■. 56 

Necessary to a choice .29 

Charles Harris had 54 

Samuel Strong 1 

C. B.McVey 1 

and Charles Harris was declared elected. 

City Registrar. Committee to collect and count 
votes— Messrs. Adams of Ward 14, Martin of Ward 7, 
Beal of Ward 16. 

Whole number of votes 56 

Necessary to a choice 29 

Nicholas A. Apollonlo had 49 

E. B. Kankin 2 

Charles M. Hinkley 5 

And Nicholas A. Apollonlo was declared elected. 
Superintendent of Sewers. Committee to collect 
and count votes— Messrs. Page of Ward 9. Train of 
Ward 13, and Sibley of Ward 21. 

Whole number of votes 60 

Necessary to a choice 31 

William H. Bradley 44 

Joseph J. Leighton 15 

F. P. Moseiey 1 

and one for an ineligible candidate. 

William H. Lradley was declared elected. 

Superintendent of Common and Public Grounds. 
Committee to collect and count votes— Messrs. 
Crowley of Ward 7, Morse of Ward 13, and Martin of 
Ward 7. 

Whole number of votes 54 

Necessary to a choice .28 

John Galvin had 37 

Herman Grundell 17 

-'ind John Galvin was declared elected. 
Water Registrar. Committee to collect and count 
votes— Messrs. Noyes of Ward 5, Willcutt of Ward 17 
and Barry of Ward 7. 

Whole number of votes 54 

Necessary to a choice 28 

William F. Uavie had 52 

E. B. Kankin 3 

and William F. Davis was declared elected. 

Supenntendents of Public Lands— Committee to 
collect and count votes— Messrs. Bearce of Ward 11, 
Wilbur of Ward 13 and Mooney of Ward 2. 

Whole number of votes 54 

Necesoary to a choice 28 

Robert W. Hall hal 51 

William B. Smart 1 

Richard J. Fenehey 2 

and Robert W. Hall was declared elected. 



43 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



Cotnmisdoner of Cedar Grove Cemetery. Report 
iioininaliug Albe C. Clark, ComrpiBsioner of Cedar 
Grovo Cemetery, and certificate of the election 
of said Clarlc as such CoinmiBsiouer, were re- 
ceived from the Board of Aldermen. The report was 
accepted, and on motion of Mr. Perkins of Ward Ifi 
the rules were suspended, 50 for, against, and the 
Council proceeded to ballot. Messrs. Perkins of 
Ward 16, Brown of Ward 8 and Sweat of Ward M 
were appointed a committee to collect and count 
votes. 

Whole number of votes 53 

Necessary tor a choice 27 

Albe C. Clark had 39 

E.B.Kaukln , 14 

and Albe C. Clark was declared elected. 

Harbor Master. Mr. Harringtou of Ward 8 present- 
ed a report from the joint special committee to nom- 
inate a candidate for the office of Harbor Master, 
recommending the election of John T. Gardner. The 
report was accepted, and on motion of Mr. Harring- 
ton of Ward 8 the rules were suspended, 37 for and 
against, and the Council proceeded to an election. 
Committee appointed to collect and count votes — 
Messrs. Harrington of Ward 8, Flately of Ward 4 and 
McCarty of Ward 5. 

Whole number of votes 55 

Necessary to a choice 28 

John T. Gardner 48 

Washington P. Gregg 1 

J. K. Crowley 3 

William B. Smart 1 

Banfleld.. 1 

J. Hewins 1 

and John T. Gardner was declared elected. 

C'itij Surveyor— Mr. Burditt of Ward 16 presented 
a report from the .ioint special committee, to nomi- 
nate a candidate for the office of City Surveyor, 
recommending the election of Thomas W. Davis. 
The report was accepted and on motion of Mr. Bur- 
ditt of Ward 16, the rules were suspended, 47 for 
against, and the Council proceeded to an election. 
Committee to collect and count votes — Messrs. 
Burditt of Ward 16, Sweetser of Wara 10, and Ab- 
Dott of Ward 3. 

Whole number of votes cast 46 

Necessary to a choice 24 

Thomas W. Da\is 43 

James F. Marston 2 

E. B. Rankin 1 

and Thomas W. Davis was declared elected. 

Citi/ Engineer. Mr. Thacher of Ward 15 presented 
a report from the joint special committee to nomi- 
nate a candidate for city engineer, recommending the 
election of Joseph W. Davis. The report was ac- 
cepted, and, on motion of Mr. Thacher, the rules 
were suspended— 44 for, against, and the Council 
proceeded to an election. Committee to collect and 
count votes— Messrs. Thacher of Ward 15, Wbiston of 
Ward 8, and Brackettof Ward 10. 

Whole number of votes cast 41 

Necessary to a choice 23 

Joseph P. Davis had 39 

E.B. Rankin 4 

W. H. Cundy 1 

and Joseph P. Davis was declared elected. 

CITT PROPERTY IN WARD NINETEEN. 

Order for the occupant of Wilson's Hotel, Ward 19, 
to be notified to vacate said premises on or before the 
Ist of April next, came from the Aldermen passed. 

The question was on giving the order a second 
reading. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5 — I should like, Mr. President, 
to ask of the Committee on Public Buildings, who 
had this subject under investigation, if they can in- 
form this Council under what circumstances the city 
of Boston came by this property. I have been told 
that it proposed to pay seventy-five thousand dol- 
lars for this property, and — if it is not true I hope 
some gentleman will state the truth — 1 have been in- 
formed that it was purchased by the town of Brighton 
after the question of annexation had become a fixed 
fact, and that there were circumstances surrounding 
the whole trade which are hardly creditable to any 
portion of the city of Boston or to the people who man- 
aged that sale and purchase. Now, sir, before I shall 
vote upon one side or the other of this question, I 
shall ascertain the facts, if lean. I have, oeen told, 
sir, that parties interested in that property were of- 
ficers of the town of Brighton, and if there is anj'- 
thingin the transaction which is corrupting, it ought 
to be frowned down. There is an idea which is 
prominent now within the limits of the city of Bos- 
ton with regard to this matter and the whole man- 
agement of the affairs of Brighton since this question 
of annexation was settled which is not credita- 
ble to the town. It has been stated to me 
that the town of Brighton has voted- to pay 



three thousand dollars, to one of its oflScers holding 
the two offices of Town Clerk and Town Treasurer; 
fifteen hundred dollars for each— after annexation 
had become a fixed fact— after the vote had been 
passed— thus taking out nf the Treasury money 
which belonged to the Treasury of the City of Boston ; 
and thie was a very much larger amount than woul 1 
have been agreed to, if the Town of Brighton had 
remained, and had not been annexed. It seems to 
me, sir, that it is taking advantage of circumstances 
to enrich the pockets of a few. My intimations may 
not be correct, but I make these statements here for 
the purpose of bringing the matter before the public, 
so that if they are not true, they may be denied, 
or the facts proven. Now, sir. If we are to be con- 
stantly annexing territory to Boston, and the moment 
that territory is annexed, advantage is taken of cir- 
cumstances — or the mom^'nt that annexation is 
carried, and while the Town Authorities have mat- 
ters in their own hands — that they unlawfully 
appropriate money, — if such things are to be- 
come patent and common — that fact had bet- 
ter be known by the citizens of Boston. I 
certainly have no animosity against any citizen of 
Brighton, but, sir, this is common talk about the 
streets. I have heard it through the City Hall, and I 
have heard it it the State House, I hear it everywhere 
that something is wrong. Why, Mr. President, by 
the act of annexation it is required that the books 
and papers of the town of Brighton shall be passed 
over, before the second Monday of January, to the 
officers of the city of Boston, to the City Clerk, 
Treasurer, or Auditor, I forget which. I have in- 
quired of the City Clerk, Treasurer and Auditor 
whether those books of record have been received 
and they fay no. They had not been received up to 
today. Now, sir, I have desired to exercise the privi- 
lege, the right to examine those books to see whatthe 
record is of those votes. I have not yet had the oppor- 
tunity to do so, but before I shall vote with regard 
to this property, I desire to know the whole circum- 
stances with regard to this purchase, and the action 
that has been taken since the purchase has been 
agreed to. I am told, sir, that a large portion of the 
seventy thousand feet of this Wilson's Hotel propor- 
ty is in the street— a public highway. If that is so, 
we ougnt to know it. If anything has been oone 
under cover which will not bear the light of investi- 
gation, I think the citizens, taxpayers and voters of 
Brighton, and the whole city, are entitled to have 
the facts known. I hope tnat no action will be 
taken until the books have been received by the 
proper officers, as required by the act of annexation, 
and, the'-efore, I trust that the further consideration 
of this matter will either be postponed, or that the 
order may be laid upon the table. I will not make a 
motion, because, perhaps, some gentleman can en- 
lighten the Council upon the question I have raised 

Mr. Burditt of Ward 16— The gentleman from. 
Ward 5 has asked for information from the Com- 
mittee on Public Buildings. 1 simply rise to say that 
the question as to how this property came into the 
hands of the city of Boston was not called upon to 
be investigated by the committee. I have no more 
knowledge of this matter than he has, and can only 
refer him to the members of the Council from that 
ward. I do not see how it can affect the action upon 
this report, whatever may be the result of this in- 
vestigation. 

Mr. Hunnewell of Ward 19— It seems that I am 
particularly called upon at this time, though had my 
colleague, who had been a member of the Board of 
Selectmen of the town of Brighton for three years, ■ 
been present, I should have expected him to make 
some explanation. When, at a previous meeting, the 
gentleman from Ward 5 called for an explanation, I 
thought I gave one as clearly as it could be stated. I 
thought those facts were all that it would 
be necessary for the Council to act upon. 
The matter of the purchase of that property 
was put into the hands of a committee of 
townsmen, and I believe they acted conscientiously 
and in ^ood faith. They believed that a new site for 
a town nail was needed. At that time no action had 
been taken by the Legislature, althoush the bill 
had been reported. When the report was accepted 
by the citizens of the town the bill had passed, and 
it was the general feeling of the townsmen that no 
further action should be taken. Up to that point 
everything was legitimate, and there was nothing in 
relation to the matter that was not straightforward 
and proper. Subsequently, a town meeting was 
called. I was not present at that meeting. I accuse no 
none of the town officers of dereliction of duty— per- 
haps it was an oversight. I was not present, because 
I did not receive any warrant for that meeting. Had 
I been there my course would have been plain. They 
did vote to purchase that site, and the time that vote 
was taken can be ascertained by the records, — 



FEBRUARY 



5 



1874r 



4.4= 



whether it was before or since annexation. Without 
having seen that record, my impression is that it 
was taken before the vote on annexation. But 
without siding with the officers of the town, 
or appearing; here to answer for them, or having con- 
sorted with them in these things, or having been 
called upon to act with them, I feel It my duty to 
state that they intended to do what was proper and 
honest, and I believe that they would not willingly 
have jeopardized annexation at that time by any 
forced action. I believe it my duty to say this at the 
present time. One other point— in relation to the 
gentleman receiving three thousand dollars, that has 
been spoken of. The Town Clerk saw fit to be a 
candidate for collector of the tow:« taxes, and he 
was elected. In that manner his duties were double,and 
his pay increased iu proportion. That is all the ex- 
planation I can offer at this time, Mr. President, and 
I see no reason for delaying action on this report of 
the committee. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5—1 have no fault to find with 
the course of the gentleman who is here as one of 
the representatives of the Nineteenth Ward. I think 
he has stated the case fairly. I have talked with him 
privately about this matter, and I differ with him 
very little. His coursj has been plain and I am sat- 
istied that if he had attended that meeting he would 
have acted differently from the majcrity. I state this 
because I think it is due to him. I am not at all partic- 
ular whether this matter shall go further. This or- 
der is to notify the occupant to vacate said premises 
on or before ttie first of April next. I have no ob- 
jection to that. But I am told by competent judges 
that if we attempted to sell that property we could.not 
get anything like the price that is to be paid for it. 
Nevertheless, the point I have raised here this even- 
ing, I shall continue to raise until I am convinced 
that it was an honest, fair transaction, but that I 
cannot tell nntil I can see the books, which at pres- 
ent I cannot get. The question I have raised will 
not be affected by the passage of this order, but I 
shall continue to raise it until I am satisfied that the 
matter is right. If it is rignt, nobody will be more 
ready to say so than £. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 6— It occurs to me that if this 
is as it has been represented to be. it may be possi- 
ble for the city to repudiate the sale, and if we give 
this notice we may put ourselves in such a position 
that we cannot repudiate the sale. It was suggested 
that this estate was sold to the city for some $75,000, 
and that now it would not bring half that sum. If 
that is the case, and it should prove a fraudulent 
transaction, it occurs to me that it may be best to 
postpone this action lest the city by giving notice to 
quit acknowledges the ownership of the property. 1 
therefore move that the report and order be laid upon 
the table. 

Mr. West of Ward 16— The same point raised by 
the gentleman from Ward 6 occurred to me— that the 
city, by notifying the occupant to quit, tacitly ac- 
knowledges ownership. I think action should 'be 
postponed. 

Mr. Burditt of Ward 16—1 have no objection to a 
postponement. If there is any possibility of that 
sale being broken I shall be glad to have the order 
laid over. I have an impression that an inquiry has 
been made of the City Solicitor as to the legality of 
the purchase, but I do not know the result of it. I 
would inquire if it is in order to move that the Com- 
mittee on the Judiciary be instructed to make an in- 
quiry as to the title to the property. 

The President— The motion would not be in order. 

Mr. Hunnewell of Ward 19—1 happen to be 
aware of the fact that the City Solicitor has made an 
investigation, and I am aware that before anv inves- 
tigation was made the town had, and the city now 
has, a clear title to the land. A very large percent- 
age of the property must ultimately go into the 
street. The former owner formerly owned the land 
out into the street, and has taken pains to guard his 
ownership. It would be impossible, if a forced sale 
were made, to realize the full cost of the property, 
but I think the city may realize the cost by retaining 
the property until "a proper time. 

Mr. Kimball of Ward 6—1 would inquire of the 
eentleman from Ward 19, if the property has been 
deeded to the town of Brighton— whether the deed 
has passed? 

Mr. Hunnewell of Ward 19—1 know that a note 
has been given, and it necessarily follows that a 
ueed has been passed. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 6—1 hope this order will be 
postponed, that some action may be taken such as 
has been suggested by the gentleman from Ward 16, 
that the Committee on the Judiciary should inquire 
into it and see how the matter stands. It seems to 
me that we ought to be careful and know exactly 
what the position of the subject is. 

The order was laid upon tlie table. 



Subsequently Mr. Burditt, of Ward 16, off'ered the 
following : 

Ordered, That the Committee on the Judiciary be 
requested to obtain the opinion of the City Solicitor 
as to the legality of the purchase of the Wilson Ho- 
tel property, so called, and report the same to the 
Council as soon ae practicable. 

Passed. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED. 

By Mr. Hunnewell of Ward 19— Petition of Alex- 
ander S. Wheeler, trustee, that two coupons of a 
city of Roxburjr bond for $1000, which have been 
lost, may be paid. Referred to the Committee on 
Finance. 

By Mr. Thacher of Ward 15 — Request from the 
School Committee for alterations and improvements 
on the Roxbury High School building, in accordance 
with plans adopted by the City Council of 1872. Re- 
ferred to the Committee on Public Instruction. 

By Mr. Wilbur of Ward 9— Petition of C. B. Bots- 
ford & Co. for the privilege of using a projecting 
sign in Hawley street. Sent up. 

By Mr. Kent of Ward 21— Petitions of George P. 
Hittell et al., John T. Barnard et al., and Edward 
Lawrence et al., in favor of changing the name of 
Charlestown to "Bunker-Hill District," and James 
■ P. George et el., and Jonathan Stone et al., against 
said change. Laid upon the table. 

By Mr. Long of Ward 22— Petitions of Franklin A. 
Hall et at., and John Turner et al. in favor of Charles- 
town being officially designated as the Bunker-Hill 
District. Laid upon the table. 

By Mr. Hicks of Ward 22— Petitions of F. O. Reed 
et al. in favor of changing the name of Charlestown 
to Bunker-Hill District. Laid upon the table. 

A petition in favor of a change of name, from A. 
Waterman et al., and a petition against a change 
from Abram E. Cutter et al., were also presented and 
laid upon the table. 

REPORTS AND ORDERS PRESENTED. 

Mr. West of Ward 16 submitted a report from the 
Committee on Public Instruction, to whom was re- 
ferred the request of the School Committee, that the 
City Council would enlarge the area of the Primary 
School lot on Lexington street, East Boston. The 
committee report that it is inexpedient to comply 
with the request. Accepted. 

Mr. West of Ward 16, from the Committee ©n Pub- 
lic Instruction, reported leave to withdraw on the 
petition of F. P. Meigs, for permission to introduce 
Meigs's physiological school desk and seat into the 
public schools of Boston. Accepted. 

By Mr. Flatley of Ward 14— 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor cause the flaps 
to be displayed on the public buildings and grounds, 
and a national salute to be fired at East and South 
Boston, the city proper, the Highlands, Dorchester, 
West Roxbury, Brightan and Charlestown, at nooa 
on the 22d inst. (Washington's birthday); the ex- 
pense to be charged to "incidentals," etc. Read once. 

By Mr. Adams of Ward 14 — 

Ordered, That the Water Board be requested to 
have printed for distribution five hundred copies of 
their report (being printed City Document No. 2W), 
on an additional supply of water. 

T'fl ^ R P H 

By Mr, "west of Ward IB- 
Ordered, That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings be authorized to furnish additional accommoda- 
tions for grammar school pupils in the Lawrence 
District, the expense to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for Schoolhouses, Public Buildings. 

Mr. West of Ward 16— As these accommodations 
are needed for a grammar class just promoted from a 
primary class, for which there are no accommoda- 
tions.at present, I move that the rules be suspended 
that the order may be passed. 

The rules were suspended, 39 for, against, and the 
order was passed. 

THE WATER SUPPLY. 

Mr. Pease of Ward 1— Mr. President, I move that 
the resolve and order for taking waters of Sudbury 
River and Farm Pond for the purpose of SHpplying 
the city (City Document No. 17), which was specially 
assigned for half-past eight o'clock this evening, be 
laid upon the table. I do this for the purpose of 
allowing the subjects referred to the Committee oa 
Water to have a thorough investigation. 

The motion was carried. 

QUINCT HALL MARKET BUILDING. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5 offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Committee on Public Buildings 
consider and report upon the expediency of adding 
one or more stories to the Quincy Hall Market Build- 
ing. 

Mr. Shaw— In some remarks which I made during 
the lafct municipal year I introduced substantially 



45 



COMMON COUNCIL 



this same subject, but it was not then considered 
expedient to talie action upon it. In view of the 
fact that there is to be a New England exhibition of 
arts this coming fall, it has occurred to me, after 
reading the petition which came into the Board of 
Aldermen from the Massachusetts Charitable Me- 
chanic Association, asking for the privilege of con- 
necting Paneuil Ilall with Quincy Market Building, 
that if there were one or more stories upon the 
Quincy Market Building every accommodation for 
the exhibition could be furnished. As this is one 
of the measures which the public now seem to be 
much interested in, I have thought proper to bring 
the matter before the Council, believing that such a 
work can, if commenced very soon, be completed 
in time for that exhibition, and the neces- 
sity of building a two-story structure across 



from Fansuil Ilall to Quincy Market Building will be 
done away with. I think that every person who will 
take the pains to visit the neighborhood of Quincy 
Hall Market will see the propriety of this proposition 
of mine without any consideration of the proposed 
exhibition, because I think if that building should be 
enlarged there can be saved to the city of Boston a 
sum equal to twelve, fifteen or twenty thousand dol- 
lars per annum. The building can be used for armo- 
ries or other public purposes, and now, it seems lo 
me, is just exactly the time to have it considered by 
the committee, and I believe the expediency of it 
will be seen when the subject is investigated. I 
therefore hope the order will pass without delay. 

The order was passed. 

On motion of Mr. Abbott of Ward 3, the Coancil 
adjourned. 



46 



BOARD OF ALIDEKMElSr, 



CITY OF BOSTON. 

Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

FEBRUARY 9, 1874- 



Thc regular weeldv meeting of the Ronrrt of 
Aldermen was hrll at four o'doek P. M., Alder- 
man Clark, Chaiimau, presiding. 

EXECUTIVE NOMINATIONS. 

Lieutenant of Police— De L'-tayette Thompron. 

Sneci.-il Police Officers— Lloyd Wcntworth and 
William J. Jordm, E Igeworth-ftrcet Chnpcl, and 
Heni-y Schrow, Fo-t Office in Chailestown. 

Severallv couftrmed. 

George H. AU^n, Superintendent cf L^mpp. 

Chailes B. ilice, Superintendent cf Faneuil 
H.-ll. 

Chailes B. Rice, Superintendent of Faneuil 
Hall M>rket=. 

Henry Faxon, Inspector of Milk. 

Timothy R. Page, Superintendent of Wagons 
and Trucks. 

llrfis C. Marsh, Superintendent cf Hacks and 
Carriages. 

Harrii-on O. Read, Superintendent of Intelli- 
gence Offices. 

Ebenezer Shute, Superintendent of Pawnbrokers. 

Al Ic) man Harris— 1 move that the norainaliou 
cf Mr. Rice 1 e laid upon the tal le. 

Al lennan Stebbins— Fot- what position? 

Ths Chiiiman— Mr. Rice is nominated for Su- 
perintendent ( f Faneuil H: 11 and for Superintend- 
ent cf Faneuil H: 11 Maikcts. 

Alierman Stebbins- 1 woi.l I like 1o know rome 
reafonwhyihe romination of ihis genllpinan is 
single! out to be laid upon the lal lo in puf Jience 
to ; 11 ihe o'.hers. 

Al leiman Presfott— I hope the nomination of 
Mr. Rice will noibe laid u) on ihs tall3wi.hout 
tome good roaf on being given for it. 

Al leiiuan Hariis— I am oppo ed at Ihis lime to 
giving anv leas^ons in a public session ( f this 
Boaid, and I hope genilomen will no; force action 
upon ihis nominaiion lodav. 

Al leiman Stebliins— I hoi;e that the gentleman, 
if he has ai;y statement to make, will ( o so in 
o, en session. I for one am ready to meet any 
ol jections that may be made against Iha Loniii.a- 
tioc. 

Al lerman Cutter— It seems to me that no harm 
can be done by allowing the nomination lo be laid 
over, an > I hoi e that it will be done if the gentle- 
man desires it. 

Al pi man Hall— I slinuld ho'e that the romina- 
tion of my f dend Mr. Ri.e will not 1 e single i out 
atihisiiine and be Ini I uj on the talle. I think 
theieis some linle filing in this mat. er, esi eii- 
ally in regard to the leases cf last xcr, but I do 
no. thiik that Mr. Rii e was les) onsi le for it. 
Mr. R;(e, i« seems to me, must 1 e f a.i'f iciory lo 
this T> oai d. He is a ( our.eous, efficient officer, he 
has |, een nomin.ite,! by the Mayor, and I ho^-e his 
con nnation will not be i,ostponed. 

Aiiderman Stebbins— I move as an amendment 
tha rll ihe nominations in the fommuni .at ion be 
laidt o.e.- uitil Wednesday next, when we ; hall 
have a.iothsr meeting. 

Al lerman Harris a^reptei the amendment, and 
thi nominations were 1 lid over till next meeting. 

PETITIONS REFERRED. 

To the Committee on Lamps. Mo"es A. Dow et 
al., that the lamo-lighLii g legulatio ,s of this city 
be extei.ded to the < h'llestowu District. 

To the Joint Committee on Streets. George 1 His 
& io.et cd., A\oi 20 F. Nerle it al., aid Cobb, 
Bates & Yerxa ct al., that Beach stieetbe widened 
near AVa; hi' gton f ticet. 

Fi om B : llett, Davis & Co. and 3C00 others, for a 
rew biidge between Cambridge and Boston. Re- 
fen ed to the Joint f ouiinittre on Streets. 

To the Committee on Fanevil Hall. Alpheua 
Hardy et al., for use of Fai cnil Hall, May L8, for a 
festivrl ly the ( oi grcgatioi rl Club. 

7o the Committee on Survey and Inepcetion of 
BuUOinr/K. 'Ihomas W. Carter, to erect a wooded 
buildii g bejo) d ihe legal dimcnsiOLS on City 
Hos) \tp\ whaif, Albai y street. 

C. J. Doi ovaii & ( o., to erect a wooden buildirg 
beyond the legal (limei sioi s i eai Norfolk aveiue. 

David H. Blai ey, lo coi, struct fheds for storage 
on CuLard whaif," Leyoi.d the legal dimeiisious. 



To the Committee on Health on the Part of the 
Hoard. W. L. Ryder et al., remonstrance against 
further stable accommodatioi.s for E. P. Beebe on 
Trenton street. 

Julia Driscoll, to occupy wooden stable for one 
horse on Whituey .street, between Conant and Tre- 
mont streets. 

C. J. Doi.ovan & Co., to occupy wooden stable 
for two horses on Court, off Noi folk street, near 
McGee street. 

Asa M. Stubbs, to occupy a wooden stable for two 
horses on Wadsworth street. 

E. P. Bepbe, to occupy additional stalls in stable 
for three horses on Trenton street (old McKav es- 
tate). ' 

Chailes F. Emery, to occupy additional stalls to 
Ptable for ten more horses on Eutaw street, second 
f .om Brooks street. 

John Deeiy, to occupy a brick stable for three 
horses on Milf ord place, Ward 15. 

A. B. Kenny, to occupy a wooden stable for 
three horses on Church place. Ward 16. 

William Henry Taylor, to occupy wooden stable 
for three horses on North Anderson street, No. 37. 

John Schoelch et al., remonstrating against the' 
erection cf a stable on Milford place by John 
Deeiy. 

Patrick Higgins et ah, remonstrating against 
erection cf staf le at 39 North Anderson street. 

C. B. Barrett et al., remonstrating against erec- 
tion of stable by M. Condon at 487 First street. 

To the Committee on Pavinrj. J. Edwards et al 
that Western avenue be raised to the established 
grade and to its full width. 

Leatherbee Brothers, to be paid for damages 
caused by the construction of a culvert on Albany 
street and Hani' on avenue. 

George Sparhawk, to be paid for gravel used on 
streets in Brighton. 

To the Committee on Police. C. B. BotFford& 
Co. et al., for leave to project signs from stores on 
Hawley street. 



El 



George B. Brake & Co., to maintain a proiectinir 

cn at 98 Federal street. ^ 

'Lo the Committee on Streets on the Part of the 

Hoard. James W. Gerard, Jr., et al., to he paid 

for land taken by authorities cf West Roxbury to 

lay out Williams street. 

James Leeds, trustee, to be allowed interest on 
the sum awarded him by the city for wicenine cf 
Peail street. ^ 

A HARBOR POLICE BOAT. 

The following was received: 

To the Honorable the Board of Aldermen of 
Boston— The undersigned, shij) owners and oihers 
doing business in thecilyof Boston, respect fully 
represent to your honorable Board, that the means 
now afforded for the transportation of the Harbor 
Police are insufficient to enable them lo peiform 
in a sail factory manner the important dulies re- 
quired of them in piofecling the commerce and 
navigation carried on at this port; wherefore we 
pray ihat a suitable steam vessel may be furnished 
to enaide the police to properly cover and protect 
the water fiont, enforce the laws, and quell dis- 
turbances on board cf vessels arriving in or de- 
parting f om our harbor. 

William F. Wcl I & Co., John S. Fmery & Co., 
L,''fo;ine & Fro;hing- Kidder, Vaughn & Co., 

ham, G. W. Finott], Vice-Con- 

J. D. Brigham & Co., sul of II aly, 

Edw'd D. Peters & Co., George S. Dubusy, acting 
Fhepard, Hall & Co., Vice-Consul for Por- 

Wm.Worihingion & Co., tugal, 
( hanuler, Smilh & Co., Joseph Nickerson & Co., 
Nathaniel Spooner., Geo. Billings, 

Addison Gage & t o., M. K. Adams, 
Glidden & Williams, John P. Squire & Co., 
Malthew Bartlelt, Fearing, Mulman & 

Larkin, Stackpole & Co., Swift, 
Sam'l D. Crane & Co., Boynton Packing Co., 
Fisher & Chapin, Wm. H. Greeley & Co., 

Nickerson & Co., Naylor & Co., 

T. B. Williams, Way & Co., 

Lambert Bros., Minot & Co., 

Chas. H. North & Co., AVoodman, Johnson .StCo, 
Lincoln, Chamberlain & F. Nickerson & Co., 

Co., Hills, Turner & Harmon, 

Will. L. AVelch, John Walter & Co., 

Jro. M. Carter, Charles Hunt, 

J. E. M. Gilley, C. & W. A. Waters, 

Caleb Robbing, fJeo. P. King, 

Isaac '1 aylcr, J. Mitcht 11 Clark, 

A. Clardner, J. Schumacher & Co., 

Sullivan, Finotti & Co., Gossler &Co., 
Alpheus Hardy & Co., Warren & Co., 
A. S. & J. Brown & Co., J. W. Rodocanachl & 
J. F. Conant & Co., Co., 



FEBRUARY 



9 



1874 



47 



J. V. Tyler & Co., Dixon & Winship, 

T. A. Dunninf^, Gill & Coot?, 

D. li. StPclman & Co., Henry W. W. Andrews, 
Page, Richardson & Co., J. Van Prane; & Co., 
Thvver & Lincoln, Geo. P. Clark & Co., 

J. Henry Sears & Co., M. F. Pickering & Co., 

Henry Ha=tin(r« & Co., H. O. KobertP, 

James H. Danf orth, E. & F. Kin:^ & Co., 

John ^y. Candler, Ricp & Davis, 

Gpo. F. Moore, A. F. L"inan, 

"VVi'^e & Russell, ; Geo. E. Smith, 

Bailey Lorine;, : AVnlti r Starbuck, 

John'G. Hall & Co., Vittum, Talbot & Co., 

Dana Bros., Ciofkett Bios., 

L. G. .Swett & Co., Mills 1 ros., 

Geo. F. Wildo, N. ]'•. Mam (lelil, 

Geo. AV. Hunter & Co., icnj. C. Clark, Consul 

CrowOl Vvo'. & Co., for Hayti; 

B. C. riark & Co., Charles H. Wise, 
Cornelius G. AtLwood, J. A. Ordway, 

C. E. J. Howard, "VV. Glover, - 

Allen it: Lord, China Mut. Ins. Co., 

J. I.an i & Co., Eoyl ton Mut. Ins. Co., 

P. R. Smith & Co., Wa&hirglon Fire and M. 
Prov. Tool Co., Ins. Co., 

Mo elev, Ho iRnian & Co.,Dcl. Mut. Srfety Ins. Co., 

ehntton (fc Moore, Ins. Co. No. America, 

A. 1!. Hall & Co., Orient;il Mut. Ins. Co., 

B. Burge s & Sons, Mercantile Mut. Ins. Co., 
Cunard Steamship Co., GreitWe ternlns.Co., 
Innifin Steamship Co., Foslon Marine Ins. Co., 
H. Mayo, American Ins. Co., 

E. S.imp'on, Mercantile Marine Ins. 
H. M. Whitney, Co., 

E. B. Samp^on, Neptune Fire & M. Ins. 
J. A. lasigi. Consul of Co., 

France, Mam fac. Fire & M. Ins. 
Gilbert Atwood, Co., 

Eben Howes, India Mut. Ins. Co., 

'Jhomas Lnmb, New Eng. Mut. Ins. Co., 

Ebene-er Davis, Pacific Mut. Ins. Co., 

R. G. F. Candage Newport Fire & M. Ins. 
E. T.D-vi-. Co., 

.Alfre INash, Jordan, Lovett & Co., 

Caleb T. Curtis, J. W. 1 pi' h, 

Jacob H. Holme=, D. D. Kelly, 

J. Winthron CofBi J. C. Howes & Co., 

Geor^re J. Curtis, Edw. Spaulding & Bum- 

A. Li. Dole, stead, 
Phinney & Cobb, Cowing & Hatch, 
Henry Amerire & Co., S.nm 1 T'atchel Jer, Jr., 

B. S. Prny & Co., S. Snow, 
Albert Thompson & Co.,W. B. Sewall, 
Lloyd Eri^-ers, Carter Bros. & Co., 
Andrew Robeson, Jame= Lovett & Co., 

J. L- Farlow & Co., Knowle -. Leland & Co., 

Ricfci& Davis, Solomon Hancock, 

Mo^^s B. AVil les, George T. Haw ley, 

Eben B. Phillips, Charles U. Costing, 

John C. Pratt, Clapp & BiUings, 

N. S. Jennev, Eben. Bacon. 
R. E. Merrill, 
Referred to the Committee on Police. 

THE PADDOCK ELMS. 

A resolution wa« received from the Massachu- 
setts Hort'cultural Society protestirg against the 
removal of the Paddock elms from Tremont 
street; al o, a remoustrance of Austin Coolidge 
et al., against the said removrl. 

.Alderman Bower presented remonstrances from 
Henry P. Kidder and 39 others, Bei jamin Dodd 
and 41 other-, Judge Abbott and 39 other''. Rev. 
James Freeman CI irke and 41 o:hers, Rev. Ph Hips 
Brooks and 14 other--, R v. C. A. Bartol and 42 
other--, James L. Litlle & Co. and 33 others, Ben- 
jnm'n S. Rotch and 40 others, Sampson Reed and 
43 others, St Uman B. vvilen and 9 oiher^, E. P. 
"Whipple and 10 others, Bei j;imin H. Paddock and 
17 others, H. L. Yarrii gtoii a' d 38 others, W. B. 
Hall and 33 others, Henrv G. F;iy and 22 oihers, 

C. P. Gate and 36 others, Cobb, Bates & Yerxa and 
25 others, Rev. George L. Chai ey nrd 40 others, 
against the removal of the Badc^ock clm'^. 

Severally rrf rred to the Committee on Common 
on tLe part of tlie Board. 

REPORTS OF CITY OFFICERS. 

Auditor's Exhibit for January. Th'? following 
statement showj ths state of the finances for the 
month : 



Appropriations, 

K^v.jnues , etc. 

G=!neril....811,'i:i:!,5i:i 44 

Special i ,70-',3'il 02 



E::cpendet]. 

$',lli.S7l 45 

b,'27o,t.;t:3 UO 



TJnexp'^nded. 

12,117.641 99 
3,433,287 42 



$5,530,12!) 41 



$20,' 41,834 4(5 S15,:j:,<J,:X5 05 
The report was sent down. 
The following quarterly reports were received: 



Overseers of the Poor. Cash on hand October 31, 
1873,13005 56; cash received since, $28,087 46; total 
disbursements, $21,262 19, including $875 12 for 
burials, $713 98 paid cities and State for relief cf 
Boston poor, $2134 31 expenses city Temporary 
Home, $4609 22 pensions and grants at office, $200 
for immediate relief of persons having no settle- 
ment, $3E62 79 for coal and wood, $4843 for gio- 
ceries, and $2028 41 expenses for Charity Building. 
The report was sent down. 

Superintendent of City Scales in Haymarket 
Square. Received $840 35; expenses, .'{■126 90; 
paid into city treasury $209 24. The report was 
sent down. 

UNFIKISHED DUSINESS. 

Order to refund to police officers in Charlestown 
the amounts paid by them for their badgrs, in ac- 
cordance with a vote of the City Council cf that 
city, Dec< mber 22, 1873. 

The question was on the passage of the order. 

Alderman Peters — In pastirg an order like that 
for the appropiiation of a sum of money, it i-eems 
to me tliere ought to be some limit to the amount 
to be expended. There is no inelicatiou given in 
the oreler as to what will be the amoui t requireel. 

Alderman Power— I move that the further con- 
sideration of the order be ref erreil to the Commit- 
tee on 1 dice. 

Alderman Cutter — I hardly think that is neces- 
sary. The Al'.lerman from the Charlestown Dis- 
trict can state to us what is to be paid for these 
badges, which is all that it is necessary for us to 
know. 

Allerman Peters — About how much money will 
be required? 

Alderman Harris — I thought the order was pret- 
ty well understood. In my judgment th? appro- 
priation will 1 ot exceeel $100, ne)r will It be less 
than $75. There will be about thirty policemen 
who will return their badges, which \viU be $2 50 
apiece. 

Alderman Peters— I move to amend the order so 
1 hat the amount shall not exceed one hunelred dol- 
lars. 

The amendment was adopted, and the order as 
amended was passeel. 

ORDER OF XOTICE. 

A petition was receiveel from C. J. Donovan & 
Co. tf Walpole, Mass., for leave to erect and use a 
steam engine of flve-hoise power in a building to 
be elected on a court off Noifolk avenue, near 
McGee street. An order was passed for a hearing 
on Monday, March 2, at 4 P. M. 

PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

Report fiom Committee on Public Instruction 
that it is inexpedient to enlarge the Lexington- 
Etieet School lot. Accepted. 

Report (leave to withdraw) on introduction into 
the public schools of Meigs's x>hy£iological school 
desks and seats. Accepted. 

Order to provide aelditional grammar-school ac- 
commodations in the Lawrence District. Passeel. 

Order for Committee on Public Buildings to le- 
porfr on expediency of adding one or more stories 
to the Faneuil-Hall Market building. Passed. 

ELECTIONS OF CITY OFFICERS. 

Reports of nominating committees, and certifi- 
cates of election by the Common Council, of John 
T. Gardner as Harbor Master, Thomas W. Davis 
as City Surveyor, anel Joseph P. Davis as City En- 
gineer were received from the Common Council, 
'ihe Boarel proceeded to an election for those offi- 
cers, and they were seveially elected, in concur- 
rence. 

ADDITIONAL APPROPRIATIONS. 

The chairman sulmitted a report from the Com- 
mittee on Finance, to whom were leferieelthe 
feveral lequests for aeleiitional appropriations 
fiom the committees on Common anel Sejuaies, 
Survey anel Inspection cf Buildings, and the Di- 
rectors of 1 ul lie Institutions, reccmmeneling the 
passage of the accompaiiying order: 

Oreiered, That the Auditor of Accounts be anel 
he hereby is authorizeel to trail' fer from the I?e- 
serveel I'linel to the appropriation for C'e)mme)nanel 
Public Grounds the sum of $7C0; to that for the 
Survey and Inspection < f Buildings $3800, and to 
that for the House of Correction the sum of 
$10,000. 

The order was passeel — yeas 12, nays 0. 

REPORTS AND ORDEKS SUB.AIITTED. 

By Al.leiman Cutter, fiom the Committee on 
Paving, rej ort in favor cf granting the jietition cf 
George B. Drake & Co., for leave to maintain a 
hoisting beam at 98 Federal street. Accepted. 



48 



BOARD OF AJLiD^RMElSr, 



By Alderman CuttT, from (ho Committee on 
Paving, reports of schedules of assess- ments for 
edgestones and sidewalk--, accompanied by orders 
for the assesf-ment of one half the cos-t upon 
ths several persons named therein, and for 
the collection of the same as follows: 
Dale street, edgestones, f 3283 18; Dorchet-ter ave- 
nue, edgestoi.es, $3789 07; East street, edgestones, 
$1826; East Fourth street, sidewalk, $500 28; eJge- 
stones, $281 26; E ist Fifth street, sidewalk, 
$2832 ;)4; East Seventh street, edgestones, $181 12; 
Em-rson street, edgestones, $480 35; F street, side- 
walk, $339 58; (iatcs street, sidewalk, $272 85; (old 
Street, sidewalk, $968 47; 1 street, sidewalk, $204 10; 
L stieet, sidiwulk, $540 84; M stri et, sidewiilk, 
$3'5 55; North (irove street, sidewalk, $70 95; Saw- 
yer stieet, sidew;(lk, $1366 43; Silver stiiet, i-ide- 
walk, $1855 76; 5-outh Maiket-street extension, 
sidewalk, $19';6 93; Vernon street, sidewalk, 
$1278 81; West Eighth street, sidewalk, $1668 15. 
The orders were severally passed. 

liy Alderman Cutter — 

Ordered, '1 hat the Superintendent of Streets be 
directed to take down and remove the old flagstaff 
now standing at the junction of Exchai ge and 
Paik streets. Ward 16; al o the old flagstaff in 
River stieet, near Blue Hill avenue, Waru 16, said 
staves having become partially decayed and dan- 
gerous to i-ublic travel. 

Passed. 

By Alderman Bigelow, from the Committee on 
Licenf es — Reports in favor of granting the peti- 
tions of Chailes H. Hicks, to exhibit a panorama 
at South and East Boston; G. S. Buckley, to give 
concert at East Boston Feb. 19 and at South Bos- 
ton Feb. 21; Joel G. Davis, for wagon i-tand in 
Brighton District; H. D. Parker & Co., for inn- 
holder's license at Parker House; AVilliam Stone, 
15 Brattle square, 1 oole <& Hill, 21 Kneelind 
street, David E. Fitzgerald, 19 La Grange street, 
Chailes B. Gannon, 75 Cambridge street, James 
Keenan, 463 Hanover street, Francis A. O'Uono- 
van, 317 Hanover street, for victuallers' licenses; 
Thomas S. Seaver, for hack stand at 117 federal 
street; George M. Morse, for hack stand on Dev- 
onshire street, at corner of State street; Bernard 
J. McTague, to keep billiard saloon at 44 Main 
street, Chariestown; Henry Burns, to give a dra- 
matic entertainment at Sumner Hall, Feb. 12; 
John H. Fallon, to give entertainment at Kennedy 
Hall. Severally accepted. 

By AlderinaiiBigelow, from the same commit- 
tee — Report (leave to withdraw, at their own re- 
quest,) on petition of Blanchard & Brothers for 
license for a theatre at 578 Washington street: and 
Thomas A. Delay, 92 Dover street, "for victualler's 
license. Severally accepted. 

By Aldeiinan 1 eters — 

Ordered, That the Committee on Sewers he re- 
quested to report what action is necessary to 
cany foiward and complete the improvements ill 
the channel of Stony Brook, which were com- 
menced by the authorities cf 'VVeSt Roxbui y. 

Passet^. 

Alderman AVorthington, from the Committee 
on Health, repoited in favor of granting the 
petitions of Otis Eddy, J. B. Simpson, GeoigC 
Claik, Jr., and James A. King, for leave to occupy 
stables. Sevei ally accepted. 

By Alderman Woithington — 

Ordered, That the license granted to C. Men- 
selage for pcimission to keep one hoi se in build- 
ing corner of Second and B stieets, be and the 
same is hereby revoked for cause (unsafe build- 
ing). , 

l-a?sed. 

By Alderman Brooks, from the Committee on 
Steam Engines, report in favor c f granting the pe- 
tition of George W. Simmons & i-on for leave to 
use steam engine at Oak Hall, in North street, the 
site having been examined by the committee and 
found satisfactory. Accepted. 

By Alderman 1 ower, from the Committee on 
Sewers, report "leave to withdraw" on the peti- 
tion of John M. Way and Cajlvin W. ( lark for 
abatement cl sewer assessments. Severally ac- 
cepted. 

Ordered, That $58 53 be abated from the assess- 
ment of Alon?o Bowers on Bremen-street sewer, 
and $32 50 be assessed upon a person unknown; 
also, that $53 05 be abated from the assessment of 
Bailey & Jenkins for a sewer in Appleton street, 
on account of over-estimate of land. 

Passed. 

By Alderman Stebbins — 

Ordered, That the City Treasurer be directed to 
pay to William Smith and P. F. McGarigle, con- 
tractors for the erection of a smallpox hospital ou 



Swctt street, in 1872, the sum of five thousand dol- 
liirs, being the amoui.t of money paid into the 
city trea uivou account of the insurance obtained 
■)ii s.-^Jd bu lji-i«j i>y fit '"intracto-s, i' excess ot 
the amount advanced by the city to said contract- 
ors wh.le the work ou taid buildii g was in prog- 
ress. 

Alderman Stebbins — I move that the order take 
its second readii g today. The order itself suffi- 
ciently cxilains the tlan^ action. These co., tract- 
ors insured the buldii g for ten thousand dollar.", 
five thousand of which was advanced by the city. 
Uhe I'moui t of the policies havii g all been paid 
over to the city, the oi'der is to pay tne balance, in 
excess of the amount advai ced by the city, to the 
contiac.ors, to whom it rightfully' belongs. 

1 he order was passed. 

ly Alderman Stebbins — 

Orueied, That the Coch'tuate Water Board be 
diiected to approve for payment from the appro- 
priation mace for a new supi ly of water, the ex- 
penses incurred by the Coin'mittce of the City 
Council on Water in procuring the information re- 
quired by orders of the City Council. 

Pagf e 1. 

By Al ierinan Bigelow — 

Ordere I, That the C'ty Engineer be authorized, 
with the appiov: 1 of the Joint Standing Commit- 
tee on the Engneei's Department, to make such 
purchases of supi 1 es, instruments, di awing ma- 
terir Is and fuinituie, and to incur such other ex- 
penses as may be uecessaiy for h'S department 
II om time to time during the present municipal 
year. 

Passed. 

Or.lneJ, That so much of the second semi- 
annual leport of the inspection of the prisons and 
houses of detention in SulTi Ik County for the year 
1873, as ul'it' s to aUerations in the jail, be referred 
to th ' Committee on County Buil dugs, with in- 
stiuctions to furnish estimates of the expense of 
making the pioposed alterations, so that the same 
may be piovided for in the appropriations for the 
next financial year, if it should be deemed expe- 
dient. 

Passed. 

Ordered, That leave be granted to William R, 
Frlls ( f this city to take the nests and eggs, or to 
kill any uni'omesticated birds at any season cf the 
year, for scientific purposes only. 

Passed. 

PROPOSED NEW -WATER BOARD. 

Aldeiman Stebbins offeied the following: 
Ordered, That the Joint Standing Committee on 
Water be reque ted to con ider and leport upon 
the cxpediemy of pioviding by ordinance for the 
c tablishinent of a single board to exercise the 
powers now ve ted in the C ochituate and My.-tic 
■water loard , — the member of which ^ha^l be 
appointed by the Miyor,.v\ith the approval of the 
City ( ouncii, and compen ated for their i-ervice^. 
On motion of Aldeiman Cutter, the order was 
laid uj on the table. 

NOMINATIONS OF FIRST ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

Aldeiman Harris sucmitted th? following re- 
port: Ju accordance with the provisions ot the 
ordinance concerning the assessment and collec- 
tion of taxis, the Joint Standing Commitlee on 
the Asses ois' Dej ariment wonl i lesj ec. fully rec- 
ommend the election of the following-namtu per- 
sons to be First Assistant Assess ois: 
Benjamin F. Palmer, AVillian[i Withington, 
William J. Ellis, John L. Brighiini, 

Michai 1 Carney, Henry Pieice, 

Edward F. Robinson, H. N. Holbiook, 
P. Ambrose Young, JohiiBiown, 

E 1-win li. S^ inney, Roger H. Scannell, 

Cha;les E. Jackhon, Josej h B. Gro'e, 

Abraham G. AS yman, C hailes E. Grant, 
William H. CunUy, Geoige A. Comins, 

Chailes Now ell, Gideon Wrlker, 

George F. M illiams, Judson Chapin, 

Otis Rich, T heo, hllus Burr, 

George F. Davis, Jo^hua S. Dunklee, 

Andiew J.Jiowne, William P. Long, 

L. Foster Morse, NahumChapin, 

Phineas B. Smith, George S. Pendergast, 

George H. Williams. 

The report was accepted. 

REQUEST FOR ADDITIONAL APPROPRIATION. 

Al lerman Harris submitted the following: 
The Committee on Stieets r< spectfiiUy report 
that an nddi.ioi.al loan of $100,000 will be requued 
to comi lete the extebsion cf Devonshiie stieet, 
northwardly from State stieet, via Wilson's lane 
to Dock square. The loan authorized at the pas. 



FEBRUARY 9, 187^4:. 



49 



sage of the order to extend this street, in May, 
1872, was il{510,000. The land and building damages 
paid from the loan to this time amount to $470,- 
822 51; for pa\ing the street, $7181 tO; and for 
other sundiy t xpenses, for auction sales and ad- 
vertising, $186; a total of $478,190— leading an un- 
expended balance of $3l,80y 99. The estimated 
amount required for the payment of claims for 
land and building damages yit unFCitled is $115,- 
000. The negotiation of the additional loan will 
cost tbe city about JBUOO. The committee theie- 
fore recommend the pastage cf the accompanying 
order : 

Ordered, That the Treasurer be and he hereby is 
authoiized to borrow, under the direction of the 
Committee on Final. ce, the sura cf one hundred 
thousand dollars, to be added to the loan for the 
extension of Devonshire stieet to Dock square. 

Referred to the Committee on Finance. 

THE WATER SUPPLY. 

The order to allow the Cochiluate Water Board 
to print live bundled extra copies of iheir report 
on an additional supply of waier, (City Document 
No. 29) came up and was passed in concuirence, 
with ihe o>her papers fiom the Common Council. 
Subseciuenily Aluerman Power moved a reconsid- 
eration of ihe vote. 

Alderman Power— I intended, when this order 
flist came up, to move that it be referred to the 
Committee on Printing. It is a very expensive 
document, and five hundred copies of it are re- 
quired. 

The vote was reconsidered. 

Altlerman 1 ower — 1 move that the order be re- 
ferred to the Committee on i rinting. My atten- 
tion has been called to this order by ihe Superin- 
tendent of 1 rinting, who says it \\in involve the 
spending of quite » large tum of money, and he 
tnoughtthe question ought to be consideied by 
the Committee on Printing. 

Alderman Cutter — 'While I am willing to accom- 
modate the chaiimau of the Committee on Print- 
ing, if his appropriation is getting i-hoit, 1 do not 
feel willing to let so impoitant a measuie as this 
go by, inasmuch as it is for the benefit of the other 
bianch. I am a member of the Water Board, anc^ 
I know the importance cf pressing forwaici this, 
matter of builuing a new conduit. 1 understand 
that this matter is hanging in the other branch 
for want of information. The members of that 
body have ihe light to be fully informed upon the 
suL3ect, and I am satisfied that if they are in- 
formed they will vote for the appropriation. If 
the printing of this report Mill be tne means of 
giving them the necessaiy information 1 hope the 
order will pass. 

Alderman Power— My attention was called to 
the subject by the superiutenctent of printing. 
[The Aluerman read a letter from the Supei ii.teuu- 
ent of Printing stating that the report wouLl be 
very expensive to reprint, requirii,g the litho- 
graphing of several maps, etc.] That is why i ask 
for this reference. 1 have not had time to consult 
him any further and have no other know leuge 
than what is conveyed in this note. 1 think the 
order, involving the expense that it does, is of 
sufficient importance to be referred to the Com- 
mittee on Printing. 

Alderman Worthington — I would inquire how 
many copies of that report were originally printed 
and distributed. 

The chairman — The Chair is unable to state. 

Aldemian AVorthington — This is a veiy impor- 
tant document. The city is about to vote to ^pend 
eight million dollars for a larger supply of water. 
Certainly the Common C ouncil shoulu have full 
infoimaiion for the consideratioH of that subiect. 
I think we ought to have the report if it dots cost 
several hundred dollars. We cannot get any in- 
formation without that report. If we begin by 
saving a few hundred dollars and end - in foolishly 
spenarug many millions, we shall regret it. I hope 
we shall pass the order as it comes from the Coun- 
cil. 

Alderman Power— I do not know that any one 
contemplates refuting the appropriation or oppos- 
ing this matter, but it seems to me that the com- 
mittee on 1 rinting should consider that order. 
That is what the committee is appointed to do and 
that is the proper place for the order to go. I 
think it is no doubt an inadvertence on the part of 
the Council, else it would have been referred to the 
committee. 1 have no doubt, if the printing i^ 
desired by the Water Board, that the committee 
on Printing will recommend that it be done. 

Aldeimau Cutter — Do 1 understand that the ex- 
pense comes from the appropriation on Printing? 



I 



Alderman Stebbins— This is (City Document No. 
29) one of the most imj ortai.t of 1 tst year, 
beiiig the report of the Cochituate Water Board 
on an additional mpi ly cf water. It embraced 
therepcrtof the City Ei.gineer, coviri. g some 
twenty ullferent four ces from which a su^i ly of 
water could be obtaii.ed. This documei t lias been 
in great demand ; citizens have cr lied for it : Imost 
daily, and ihe Water Board has Lecii ui.alle tc 
suj ply them. It would, 1 think, be very fooli h to' 
delay this matter by the proposed reference of this 
orcer. There are maps in that re) ort which are 
valuable and will cost a large amount of mouey, 
but I shall go for the printii^g. 1 do i ot thii;k it 
becomes the Sujuerii.tendent to delay this appio- 
priation for a water supply by preventing the 
pi in til g of this report. 

Alderman i ower— I do rot see what reason any 
one has got to say that the Superintendent o£. 
Piinting has attempted to dcKiy the passage tf^ 
the order for a water supi ly. 

Alderman Stebbins— That note. 

Alderman Power— Jus-t now there was a little 
matter of badges, which amounted to a hundred' 
dollars, on which it was very particular to placa a 
limit. Here is a matter that we do rot know 
whether it will cost a hundred or a thousand dcl- 
lais. This Goveriment thould kr ow what is go- 
ing to be do c, and that is what we have a Super- 
inteiidei t cf i rinting for. Kobody here can t< 11 
what it is going to cost. If any gentleman wishes 
to i.ame a certain limit to the exjienses, as la the' 
case of those badges, it will be just as good. Un- 
Itss 5ome such precaution is taken I think it 
should go to the Committee on Prii ting. 

Al leimm Cutter — 1 suppo-ed that it was the 
duty of the Superintendent of Printing to super^ 
intend \\hat we ordered to be piinted, and I did 
not know that it was necessaiy for Lim to say 
what should or shoi Id not be printed. For my 
part, I have all the information 1 want; but I want 
thos,; gentlemen in ihe Common Coi^ncil to be 
enlightcnev.. Our water supply may be exh lusteel 
at any moment, when we do not ur am cf it. Our 
conduit is piesseei very hard every day, and is 
liable to gi^ e out. I do not see anygooi reason 
forelelay. 

Al lerman Power — I do not see how any one can 
have goo I reason for thinking that the Superin- 
tendent of 1 rinting wn-hes to dictate in this mat- 
ter. Hesinqly wishes to c; 11 attention to the 
large amount of money to be expended. 'J here 
have been five hunelred of those elocuments circu- 
lai ed already, and I think that if they coul I have 
anything to do w ith the taking of the water, it 
wonl 1 ha^ e been taken long ago. 

(:n motion of ^Herman Cutter, the motion to 
refer was laid upon the tnlle in order to allow 
time to get information concerning the number of 
documents printed, etc., and later in the session 
on motion of j^lderman lower, the subject was 
again taken up for discussion. 

Alderman 1 ower— I reiterate the statement that 
it f eems ir rr.e »brt the 'oro'„rv d^Si osi io" ')f ih'S 
matter is to refer the order to the Commit ee on 
Printing. If any member of ihe Committee on 
Water or Water Board will state that this order is 
au horized by them, or came f rem them, I have lo 
objection to it, provideel the amount islimiied. 
Now, it seems to me that any one e an come here 
from the street, and, Ihiough inadvertence on the 
part of members of the < ouncil, or this Board, 
get an order to piint five hundred ( opies cf 
the history cf the eiiy cf Boston. Now, is i 
proper for this Board to grant sueh a request 
without if has the pro er authority or re ommend- 
ation. Besides, Ihe order is drawn indefinitely — 
without sajing who is to nay fo'- the piinting. Of 
course, if the members cf ihe Waicr Board or the 
Committee on Waier request it in j roper form, 
the C ommitiee on Priniing will not object to it. 

Aldeiman Stebbins— This order was not offered 
by any one on the street, but by one of the most 
inbelligent members cf the other branch of the 
City Council. I suppose he knew that the supply 
of tbe rcijoris had been ohaust^^d. I move that 
the subject be laid u on the table until Wednes- 
day next, when I will give the gentleman the in- 
formation he desiies. 

The motion jirevailed. 

On motion of Alderman Stebbins, it was ordered 
that when the Board adjourn it be to Wednesday 
next at one o'clock P. M. 

On motion of Alderman Stebbins it was ordered 
that a committt e cf one be apj ointcd to examine 
the returns of the special election in Ward 3 to- 
morrow, and the chiirman appointed Alderman 
Stebbins saiej. committee. 



50 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 



SMITH'S RIDING SCHOOL. 

Alierman Tower moved to reconsider thT vote 
of the last meeting grantiuc; "leave to withdraw" 
on petition of J. M. Smith for a riding-school sta- 
ble in rear of 101.3 Wn? bington .street, on property 
cf the heirs of W.lliam Bngh im. 

Al ,ei man Worthing! on— 1 should like to have 
some reasons given why we should reconsider that 
vote. 

Alderman Tower— My reason is principnlly this: 
Of couri^e, until the vote was tiikcn on that ques- 
tion, I had no idea how any member.' cf thus Board 
were going to vote. Af t;er seeing the votes ( f the 
members of this Bou-d 1 must say that I was very 
much astonishe 1, and I cannot understand how 
some genllomen could vote as they did on this 
que tio.i. Tere is one gentlem:in in this Bo.irJ, at 
least, who voted in favor of granting the piayer 
of the petitioner ffi;er making a thorough exfi'mi- 
uiition of ;in estallishm^nt sim lar to the one pro- 
posed in this petition, of which a member of this 
Board is one of the proprietors. Af.er making 
th It examination he came to the conclusion that 
such an establishment coul 1 not be a nuisance. 

Al lermau H inis— 1 rise to the point of order, 
whether th ^ Al lei man has the right; to renect up- 
on a. y member of the Board in regard to his bu-i- 
11 ess. 

The Chairman— The Chair does rot under.stand 
that Al lerman Power does reflect upon any mem- 
ber of this Board. 

Al lerman To.ver — I do not see how any one can 
coiistrue anything I have said as a reflection upon 
auy member of this Board. It is no retlection up- 
on a gcllemaii to say that he carries on a ridii.g 
school, which, I contend, is a respectable busii.css. 
I did not iuteiid ai y such retlection. 1 said that 
one gctleman ii formed me that he voted to grant 
the prayer of the petitio..ers ;if ter thoroughly ex- 
ami, i.jg an establishment of which a member cf 
this Board is part owiier. According to his judg- 
mer>t such an est.abliehment coulJ rot be a nui- 
sance. Now, the gentleman f.om the Highland 
District dwelt strongly upon the fact that this 
establishment must be a nuisance, and he made a 
very pathetic appeal f jr the hecTlth and welfare cf 
thepeople living in tlie vicinity, on tlie strength 
cf the statement that stables generally are nui- 
sances. Now, sir, it seems to me that theie is dan- 
ger cf this question being run into the ground, 
and ttiat the law, which was made for a good pur- 
po-e, is to be perverted and used to tlie uetiimenfc 
andinjuiyof enterprising business men tf this 
city. 1 should like to know wliere the bone and 
sinew of this country emanated f/om, — and wheie 
our foi< fathers brought up, if it was not < lote by 
the idc cf stables and in the fields, and not over 
heated furnaces and steam pipes, and where they 
got their st.ength fiom. A great deal of 
biincouil e and capital is made out tf this name 
cf stable, and the gentleman comes in liere 
with the names of physicians appended to 
certificates that the health of residents of that 
vicinity would be endangered, if a stable is located 
there. Furthermore, sir, members tf this Board 
have int. mated that if more space were allowed 
on two sides of that stable, if sufficient room was 
left so that a ho.e carriage or steam engine might 
go by the side cf that, builiii.g, they 
m'ght charge their votes. : That, sir, is 
ai. other rea-oa way I have moveil a re- 
consideration. But, as I I'iaid before, the 
ge.tleman's main reliance wais o.i his etfort to 
prove that such places must jnecessarly br nui- 
sances. Now, as a membejr of this Loard 
is one of the propr.etors of such an 
establishmaiit, and he vofed against g.r- 
ing the petitioners permission lo build a 
stable— and 1 do notbcl.eve he voce J against it be- 
cause he tliought such an establ.^hment woulf be 
a nu sance— he may ».e*ire aiu opportunity to give 
h s reasons tor .^o aong. If he is prepare 1 to give 
goo I reasons, and w 11 g.ve theiu, ana if he states 
that it w 11 be a nuisance, 1 sh.U not press this 
matter any further, for he ought to be the very 
best aui'nority on such matters. I said 
that one member mitht change his vote 
if more space were t<J| be allowed around 
the bu IJing. I bel eve the owners of that land 
are desiious of meeiiug the residents about ihe.e 
in the most 1 beral spirit. 'Ihey are also anx.ous 
to occupy their own 1 ind an i get some income 
fiomit. 'Ihey have been thwarted in eveiv at- 
tempt to improve their piopeity, but I nave ro 
doubt that f time is given, such alierat.ons w 11 
be maae in the plans that some objections fioui 
members of ihis Board wjII bfe ren.oveJ. 'Jhoso 
are the leaf ons why 1 make this n.oiion, and 1 
hope th.s Board WiU icconsider the vote. 



Alderman Worthington— I trust that we shall 
not reconsider this vote. I have looked at the 
subject very carefully, and am fully convinced 
that the erection of .such a stal le as is piOj.osed 
will be a very serious inconvenience to the resi- 
dents about there ; will largely deteriorate the 
value of their property, and result veivmuch to 
the disadvantage of ihe city. Last Monday I 
dwelt very largely uiion the nuisances which the 
citizens of that locality believe will occur if the 
Stable is erected, but 1 (lid not sjeak of the risk 
from fire as 1 had intended. In investigating the 
subject I went to see the presidents cf several file- 
insurance companies. The question 1 put to them 
was, "Will this increase the risk?" Three cf thtm 
said it would inci ease the risk fiom thirty-three 
to fif ;;y per cent. Persons living in that square 
will have to pay thiity-three per cent, moie oa 
their insurance than now. Today 1 went to the 
Fire Coinmissio. - ;s in this builuing, giving them 
the exact figures, fiom which they luaae a diaw- 
ing. They called in the Chicf-E.gineer tf the Fire 
Department for consultation, anu today 1 received 
this note : 

Boston, Fel). 9th, 1874. 

Alderman Worthington: Dear Sir— The t hie f- 
Engineer joins with me in the oiiinion that a 
building ot the size named, with its suriounuings, 
means of access shown, and the uses intended to 
be made of it, make it extiemrly hazaidous in 
case of fire, much more dithcuU to extirguish 
than other buildings, and if well on fiie would be 
very disastrous to the neighboihood. 

^ eiy respectfully, 

D. ClIAMBERLIN." 

I asked him, before he wrote this note, to what 
extent it would incifiase the lisk, and he answeied, 
"The chances of putting out a fire would be at 
least twenty-five per cent, less than in an ordin.ary 
building erected on the street." I take it that the 
opinion of the I'ire Commissioners and the C hief- 
Engineer is about as good authoiity as < an be ob- 
tained. The lot is two hundied ana five feet oeep, 
has one hundred and six feet f.ont on Washington 
street, and one hundred and six feet nine inehes 
in the rear. The front buiLnng is five stories 
high and sixty-five feet deep. The passage 
fiom the rear is through an art hway eleven feet 
ana four inches in wiaih and sixty-five feet deep, 
the building being one hundred and three feet 
squaie. There is no other way of attacking .hat 
building uiiless from Briggs plate, on whit h ihey 
have no righr to go. If they had such a light ihe 
building would have lo be attacked intheiear — 
otherwise there would be no chance except 
through the arch. Now, I want to ask what 
chance there is with a ladder in an arch like ihis. 
On the sides the building goes wiihin eighteen 
inches of the abutters, the yards to the house be- 
ing only ten feet wide, if you wished to get into 
this building, you would have to hold a ho^c pipe 
straight up and down. I think ihe facts fully jus- 
tify the iiie Commissioners in saying ic is ihe 
worst building thatcan beeiecied in ihat viciiii.y. 

Alderman Power— I gave as one of my reasons 
for a reconsideration that the owners of this piop- 
eity wish to meet all objections that may be ofl.er- 
ed in the most liberal spirit. Ihey propo. e to 
alter the plan and leave suificient space to meet 
all objections. But the Alierman has lead a 1 tter 
from Mr. Chambeilin. 1 would state, Mr. Chair- 
man, that David Chambeilin gave the permission 
to erect that Luilding, and he stated that it would 
be getting rid of the great risk w hich, he thought, 
existed oa the premises as they stana today. So 
much for what Mr. Chambeilin says. Now, sir, I 
want to ask the gentleman, if, when he consulted 
with the insurance companies, they were aware of 
the present condition ot the piemises. 

Alderman Worthington — leifectly, sir. 

Aldeiman Power — And knew the kind of build- 
ings standing there ? 

Aldeiman Worthington — Yes, sir, they told me 
of the kind of building. 

Alderman Power — ilie owners of this estate do 
not propose to have seventy-five windows nor half 
that number open. A good proportion of the 
windows on those plans are to be bricked up. 
But 1 propose, if tnis matter is reconsidered, to 
have it laid upon the table until the owners of the 
property can present plans which will be satis- 
factory to this Board. A great many of the ob- 
jections raised by the gentleman fioin tlie High- 
lauds would be obviated if a cliange weie made 
in the plans. 'J he owners intend to try to meet 
any reasonable objection against such a bail ling. 

Alderman VVoriiiington — r wish to correct the 
gentleman. Tnere are to be seventy-five windows 
on each end, and the half -windows (.which ^ic t 



FEBI1UAI?,Y 9, 1874. 



51 



be bricked up) are for light -where the horres are 
to stand. The windows above that are to be in 
the riding school, and must be open for ventila- 
tion. 

Alderman Power— Ore other matter I wiph to 
state, 'ihe r ghts of the owi.ers of this property 
in Briggs place cam ot be disputed. 1 holi 
in my hand here records which co.clusivcly prove 
Iheir right to pass through l-riggs place— 'f that 
has ai yihii g to do with this quest. oi , though 1 do 
i.ot thu.k that w 11 have very much ii.lluei.ce. 

Alderman Prescott — I was veiy mtich surprised 
at theremaiks of the geillemaii fiom 'Wardl2. 
If he did not reflect upon an hoj.oraLle member of 
this Board, he certaii ly did question tiie motive 
of that gei.lleman's vote at the lai-t setsioi'. 'J hat 
gei.tleman veiy propel ly keeps his feat; but, for 
oiie, 1 am not wilLi g to let such remaiks pass un- 
noticed. 1 do 1 ot thii k It gei.tlemai ly to attempt 
to force that member to give his iea> ons for vot- 
ii g as he did at the last meetii g cf this Board. 
But the takii g it for grai.ted that because thef-e 
parties are ptttmp^infV" es+nblish s busi-.^ss simi- 
lar to his, he voted as he did because he did not 
-wait any comi.etition in that section of the city 
"is, it seems to me, a f'lur that should i ot be passed 
uui-oticed. I visited the piemises with the Alder- 
man from Ward 1, and tne members cf the com- 
mlttte, and I am suie we ciid i ot hcf-itate five 
minutes in regard to the unsuitableiess of the site 
for a stable of tliis kind. I believe it will depreci- 

■ ate all the proi erty in the ntighboi hood about 
there fully twenty-five per cei.t. And I am willing 
to take it for g. anted that evciy gentleman in this 
Board, even if he cairied on the same business, 
would cast his vote on the me: its cf this case, and 
that the gentleman referred to voted as honestly 
as any other member of this Board. 

Alderman Power— I do not . ee why, if a perron 

is blameles^ , he .i-hould need any dtfeme. Jf the 

1 gentleman catt his vote through bone t motives I 

«o not see that he needs any defender in this 

■ Board. The que tion before us i-^ en a reconsider- 
: ation of the vote whereby we gave the petitioners 

leave to withdraw. 

Aldeiman Biook-— The gentleman from "Ward 9 
veiy properly ^ ays I vi ited the locality in compa- 
ny with both members of the rommit.ee, and, as 
stated by the gentleman tiom Ward 15, my great- 
est objection to tlie place, and my strongest 
rea on for voting again-t granting the j.eti- 
lion, was the risii in case of tire. With the 
location turiounded by dwelling house , and 
the close pioximity that thi. building would 
have to tho e hou-c, I certainly could i.ot 
contider that Iwasdoii.g justice to the property 
hollers in that locality to vote to permit the erec- 
tion of a builiiig of that magLitude which might 
be tilled with mateiiiils that woul.l cause an im- 
mense tire. That was my great i earoii for votii g 
as 1 did. As for the rtmarks cf tire gentleman 
from Ward 12, 1 did notsup)Ohe before that it 
was required of any mf mber cf this Board that he 
should tell any gentleman how he intended to 
vote, or wny he did s o. i formed my own o^.i^ion 
and ^ oted on it precisely the same as he diii. 

Aldeiman Cutter— Tnis question seems to 
troul le this Board s omewbat, and I do not kr ow 
but that it may be as well to have another mem- 
ber cf this Board on the Committee on Health. It 
seems that a committee of two cainot agree. 
Tnty both differ as to tie manner in which this 
buildii g is to be constructed, and i ow the matter 
has simmered down to dai ger from tire. I do 
tot see how a manufacturing i lace is to 
iLcrease the risk. The i.surance men say it 
will increase the risk. Why, if you erect a i lace 
as high as the Parker House any whei e, it will in- 
create the lisk. Uo you suppose the owneis can 
afford to keep theii land bare because when they 
put a buildii g on it it will increase the lisk? if 
you help builairg, you will help the citv. 1 have 
voted against these heiis puttii g up'hazardous 
buildings. NoLody said this riiiing fchotl was 
hazardous when it was down here on Wa^hil.gtou 
street. There is no;hiug hazardous about it. you 
build a barren brick wall— there is nothing to 
burn. I do not see any objection to a close con- 
nection with a high buildii.g. Mr. fcmith is a gen- 
tleman. I have sent my daughters to his ridii g 
school and I pretena to say that we should 
not oiscourage ridii g schools. It is a health- 
ful exercise. Thegenileman alludes to the fact 
that the petitioners in aid of this school come 
from Beacon and Hancock streets. Why, that is 
the nearest we can get to such an ins^titution at 
the present price of land. The member cf this 
Board who carries on a riding school need noi fear 
about his customers. I do not believe he does 



The more riding schools we have, the more people 
■will ride. The more we buil 1 in a neighborhood, 
the more hazardous it will be for occupants of 
buil lings there. Increase building, and you in- 
crease the risk. 

AlJeiman Power— I trust the reconsideration 
will prevail, and I trust that the gentl; men who 
have exfiressed themselves as willing to vote for 
the petition, if certain alterations can be 
made in the construction cf that ctablish- 
mnt, will \ ot for the reconsideration, that this 
matter may 1 e laid uj on the tal le until i lans can 
be sul mitted which will be satisf actoiy to a ma- 
joiity cf this Board. 

AKeiman Worthirgton- 1 trust that we shall 
not reconsider thisvote. If they jnopose to change 
their 1 lans let them come in with a nc w i etition, 
and let it be rcf ried to a new committee. This 
matter has be- n bi fore the committf e, and should 
be disi osed of, t o that the resiaents of that vicin- 
ity will kiiow what thf y can dej end ui on. When 
J lans thpt will meet the wants of the Fire Ee] art- 
mtntwill come up, that will be time enough to 
act in on them. 

Aldeiman lower- The gertleman forgets that 
if this petition is n fused the petitioners will be 
pi evented f ora comirg here again this year. 

Aldeimaa Cutter in tUe chair. 

AlJeiman Clark— I hope the motion to reconsid. 
cr will j)ievail. I thii k it is an ui fair and an uu 
just thii g towards these ])arties who wish to im" 
prove their property to lefuse to grant this peti- 
tion. As 1 understand it, there are three purposes 
for which this property can be improved. One is 
a riding school, oi.e a buildirg for mechanical pur- 
poses, and the other is for a t ower garden. 1 con- 
tend that we cam ot compel the owi.ers cf this 
property to keep their land vacant, or use it for 
the purposes of a flower garden, or to give light 
and air to the surrounding resident^. I am .sur- 
prised that the gertleman from the Highland Dis- 
trict should be so opposed to the erection of st.a- 
bles. He has a inagniflcent stable cf his own, fil- 
ed with hor> es and cows, and his f iimily do not ob- 
jet t to it. 1' urthermore, there are within a stone's 
thiow ( f many of the best houses in Boston stables 
containing five bundled horses, and they are not ob- 
jectionable. 1' or years ago there was on C bestnut 
street a first-class riding schoc 1, patronized by the 
neighborhood. None ever objected to that stalle 
on account cf nuisance or dangers from fire. Fur- 
thei more, this great bugbear cf fiie,whiih is so 
viviuly portrayed, is all moonshine. A stable is 
not half t o dangerous as a machine shop. I think 
the OM'ners cf that propeity deserve great 
credit for wanting to go forward and improve 
their buil ling. AVe r^ fused to give them permis- 
f ion to put up a building for mechanical purposes, 
and now they ask for pei mission to erect such rn 
cstal lis hment as you w ill see in New York right en 
the main streets. A modern stable is quite a differ- 
ent thlngf rom the nuisance that exists on the terri- 
to yatlhepresenttime. No\v,sir,agreatstress was 
laid upon the fact that pec pie who signed the peti- 
tions for this riding s choc 1 aid not live in the im- 
mediate neighboi hood. '1 hat petition was got up 
for this leason: It was insinuated thnt ibis riding 
Echoc 1 would not be kept in a i especta) le manner, 
and those who signed that petition wished to show 
that they disputed that theoiy. It showed 
that Ml. Smith's school had been patron- 
ized Vy the veiy best people in Boston; that 
It had been managed in such a manner that 
mothers would fllow their daughters to go 
there. And that, sir, has been the character of 
the ridii g-school stal le kept on Was hirgton stieet 
for twenty-five or thirty years. It did not take 
fire there,— but a fire caught in a furniture store 
and burned the stalle down. In regard to raising 
the insurance rates, it is not necessary to goto 
piesidents cf insurance companies. 1 am sur- 
prised that they did not say that the increase 
woilibe greater. Nor is it necessary for us to go to 
the Fire Commissioners, for we know just ns much 
about It as they do. 'J he effect cf refusing to 
grant this petition will be to cause ihe ow^iers, in- 
stead of improving iheir property, to dispose 
cf it and put the money into United States 
bonds. We want just such men who will im- 
prove property, — by the erection of buildings 
for mechanical purposes, instead of investing 
their money in Coven.ment bonds. Now, I 
coniend that the wants cf this ( ommunity demand 
£U( h insti.utions as this. We have not got enough 
cf them m the ( i.y lodav. The veiy least we can 
do IS to recon.sider the last vo'.e, lay the petition 
on the tal le, and let the par. ies c ome"f oi ward w ii h 
their 1 lans, as theyprojose to do: let them pre- 
sent plans which this Board can accept. It is 



52 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



nothing more th.an an act of justice. So far as 
being an injury to tlie neight.orhood, Ihc iaea is 
f UaLious. The character of that neighborhood 
has been changing, and has not been a very desir- 
alle plice for dwellings for many years. Dover 
street, Shawmut avenue, Treinont street and 
Washington street, in that se Jiion, are fast becom- 
ing business sireets, and I ho,.e to see the lime 
when we shall i.ee I all that terri.Oi-y for business. 
Tho'-e peo; le cannot afford to live on land whi:h 
commands such a high j/rice. Those parties are 
not going to be ii.jured so very much. You can- 
rot fli.d a party there who bought laud sev- 
eral years ago, but can sell it toJay for much 
much more ttian he paii for it. I am glai to 
see busii.ess growii.g towards the South E .d, and 
I do iiOt care now soon that sectio.x will be turned 
into business street*. Now, if ttiose parties do 
i;ot wai.t to stny there, 1 t th m sell out and move 
away. Mr. Brigham will buy the laud and per- 
haps erect a hotel there, or a theatre. 1 would 
not do anything to ii.juie these peoj le, but we 
rllow stablis at the Vest E .d, it seems to me 
tuat we can do fo at thft Pouth End. Let us re- 
co.isiJer this vote aud 1 ly the subj ict upon the ta- 
bl->, and let the architect present i l-ius that we 
can accept, so that uo member of this Board can 
Bay it is dai gerous o i account of lire. 

Al lerman 1. ower — The gen.leman from Ward 9 
has unierlaken in his defence of ano her member, 
lo catechise me as to my righ s in this Board. I 
think I know my rights, and knowing them I feel 
capable of maintaining ihem for myself , an t do 
no ; need any voluuicers in my d( feuv e. I was in 
hopes that we had an entire Board made up of that 
kind of ma.erial. I claim iha.Ihave a right to 
cal u^^on any member of his Boari io give infor- 
mation upoii any subject. When we know ihat 
one gen leman possesses more informaaon upon 
Ibis subject than any o.her member, I think we 
have arigh;,lo call upon him. Now, sir, id does 
api)ear that one gen.leman of ihis Board has 
vo ed against a measure that might be for the 
pu. lie good, because his private in erest m ght be 
assaded. I say ic has that appearance, and being 
fo, it is a grave re^^ection upon ihis Boar I. SulE 
h.is not b-en ihs case since I have been a member 
of ihis Board. I desire to read the following f.om 
th*; rules and orders of iha Board of Aldermen: 

"3cct. 14. No member shill bo permitted to 
vote, or serve 1 any committee, on any question 
•where his private right is immeuiately coi.cerned, 
diitinct f lom the public interest." 

I do not say that any member of this Board is 



situated as that rules ays, but it is for members of 
this Board to ex].lain if they have the appearance 
of doing so. I do not claim or charge that any 
member lias done so, but 1 say it has the appear- 
ance of being to; that impression has gone abroad 
and r.othing but an explanation will efface it, 
and in justice to this Board an explanation is 
called for. The gentleman can give it or not, as 
he chooses. 

Al lerman Worthington — I dcire to say that 
th ^re are more than tiiree uses which can be made 
of this property. First, th y claim to have a right 
to go through Briggs J lice; if that is so they can 
put up a style of bull ling tnat wiD let quickly and 
profitably. There are abundant other uses to 
wiiich the property can be put. But wliat are the 
facts in the case? Ask why that property 's as- 
sessed at $1 50 per foot, and the assessors will tell 
you that it is interior property and cannot be used 
for many purposes. The Al lerman says the owner 
w 11 buy tne adjoining property for a respectable 
pr.ce. The abutters nave said they woul 1 buy this 
land, but the least the owner wjU take is 5*5 per 
fojt. The gentleman says that section is all com- 
ing into business uses. Why, the very nature of 
the streets will keep business away from that sec- 
tion. It is inhabited by a class oif persons whom 
■we are called upon to protect from nuisance. 
They have bu It their houses and should be per- 
mitLed to live there and t ot have a nuisance 
placed beside them. Let them place that building 
sixty feet h'gh there and the sun wifl 
never shine on the adjacent dwfUings. That 
is a nuisance which the city authorities ought to 
prevent being put there. In addition to the height 
of the building, comes the smell from the stable, 
the noise from the stamping and kicking of horses 
and the shaking of wudows. Everything about a 
riding school becomes a nuisance, especially in 
the summer season. If those ladi- s at the West 
Eud desire to have a ri ling school, they can build 
one right in their midst. And if tne abutters 
choose to move away they can affori to do so. But 
down here, their houses are all they have in the 
world, — and mortgaged at that. This stable 
wll i-educe the value of those houses fully twf nty- 
flve per cent.; it will be a ciuelty that this Board 
should not permit. When a new petition comes 
in for a stable let us consider that, but let the vote 
on this one remain where it is. 

On motion of Alderman Stebbins, the motion to 
reconsider was laid upon the table. 

On motion of Alderman Stebbins, the Board ad- 
journed. 



BOARD OF ALDER MEIST. 



53 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldeiinen, 

FEBRUARY 11, 1874. 



An adjourned meeting of the Board of Alder- 
men was hell at one o'clock P. M., Alderman 
Clark, chairman, presiding. 

UKFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order to abate sewer assessments on Alonzo 
Bowers and Bailey & Jenkins. Passed. 

THE SPECIAL ELECTION IN WARD THREE. 

Al lerman Stebbins presented the following : 
The committee appointed to examine the return 
of votes cast in Ward 3 on the lOih inst., for one 
Representative from the Third Suffolk District in 
the place of John Tewksbury, whose seat was 
declared vacant by the jiresent Legislature, 
have attended to that duty, and report that 
the return is propeily made, and exhibits the fol- 
lowing result : 

Nathimiel J. Kust has 382 

Thnmas J. Anderson 248 

WiUiam H. Cook 109 

Nathaniel J. Kust, having a plurality of ballots, is 
accordingly elected. 

Solomon B. Stehbins, Committee. 
The report was accepted and the certificate of 
election of Nathaniel J. Rust was signed. 

REPORTS presented. 

By Alderman Bigelow, from the Committee on 
Common and Public (4roun(is— Report on the peti- 
tion of Elisha T. Loring, for leave to cut cfovvn 
two trees on Ashland street. Ward 16, recommend- 
ing that the petitioner be allowed to remove said 
trees at his own expense and under the direction 
of the superintendent of Common and Public 
Grounds. Accepted. 

14y AUlerman Bigelow, from the Committee on 
Licenses — Report in favor of granting the peti- 
tions of Warren-street Chapel to hold a festival at 
Music Hall, Feb. 23,1874; and Albert Howe for 
license as an auctioneer at Brighton. Severally 
accepted. 

ELECTION OF FIRST-ASSISTANT-ASSESSORS. 

Aldeiman Stebbins moved that the Board pro- 
ceed to an election for First- Assistant- Assessors. 

Al lerman Prescott— I hope this matter will not 
be hurried up today. I have not had time to look 
over this list of nominations for First-Assistant- 
Assessors which has been upon our table since the 
last meeting, having bten engaged in public busi- 
ness both day and evening. Here we have thirty- 
three First- Assistant- Assessors to elect, who are to 
make a valuation of several hundred million dollars 
of property. I shouLl like to have a little more 
time to look into the subject, that I might vote 
more intelligently than 1 can today. The ordi- 
nance prescribes that these officers shall be elected 
on the first Monday of Februaiy, or within sixty 
days thereafter, and they do not assume their po- 
sitions until the first of April. I cannot see any 
advantage in taking a ballot today, and 1 ask that 
the nominations be laid over, at least until the 
regular meeting on Monday next. 

Alterman Stebbins — I suppose it is understood 
that the object of committees is to give such mat- 
ters the careful consideration they require. The 
Committee on Assessors' Department have spent 
considerable time in making up these nomina- 
tions, and they certainly have been successful in 
procuring thirty-three candidates who will bear 
very favorable comparison with any who have 
been presented for many years. If a member is 
dissatisfied with any name on the list he can sub- 
stitute another for it. 

The Board voted to proceed to an election. 

Alderman Prescott moved that a recess of five 
minutes be taken. Lost. 

Aldermen Stebbins and Harris were appointed a 
commitlee to collect and count votes, and they re- 
ported as follows • 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

Benjamin F. Palmer 12 

William J. EUis 12 

Micha,il Carney 12 

Kdward F. Robinson 12 

P. Ambrose \ oimg 12 

Edwin B. Spinney 12 

Charles E. Jackson 12 



Abraham G. Wyman 3 

William H. Cundy 12 

Charles Newell 12 

George F. WiUiams 12 

Otis Rich U 

George F. Davis U 

Andrew J. Browne 12 

L. Foster Morse 12 

Phineas B.Smith 12 

William Wlthington 12 

John L. Brigham 12 

Henry Pierce 12 

H. N. Holbrook 7 

John Brown 9 

R oger H . Scanned 12 

Joseph R. Grose 11 

Charles E. Grant 5 

George A. Comins 12 

Gideon Walker 12 

Judson Chapiu 8 

Theophilus Burr 11 

Joshua S. Dunklee 12 

William B. Long 11 

Nahum Chapiu 10 

Georsre S. Pendergast — 12 

John H. Giblin 8 

Joseph L. Draw 8 

Richard J. Fennelly T 

James Healey 51 

P. McCarty 3 

A. Vose,.Jr 1 

James Dennie 2 

William Gallagher 1 

A. D. Capen 1 

The gentlemen above-named receiving a ma- 
jority of all the votes cast were declared elected 
on the part of the Board, except Messrs. Holbrook 
and Fennelly, who had seven each. The second 
ballot resulted as follows : 

Whole number of votes cast 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

H. N. Holbrook 4 

R. J. Fennelly 8 

and R. J. Fennelly was declared elected on the 
part of the Board. 

BEQUEST FOR ADDITIONAL APPROPRIATION. 

Alderman Cutter presented a report (City Doc. 
No. 24) from the Committee on Bridges, requesting 
an additional appropriation for the remainder of 
the financial year. The expenses incurred on sev- 
eral bridges beyond the amounts anticipated at 
the beginning of the year have been as follows: 
Broadway Bridge, $575; Mt. Washington-avenue 
Bridge, $1801 47; Neponset Bridge, $985 96; Merid- 
ian-street Bridge, $601. In addition to these ex- 
penses, the department is called upon to make pro- 
vision for the care and maintenance of bridges in 
the territory recently annexed. The estimated 
amount during the remainder of the financial year 
is $5004 32, and the committee request an addi- 
tional appropriation for $5000. 

On motion of Alderman Cutter, the report was 
referred to the Committee on Finance. 

REPORT OF THE FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 

The report of the Board of Fire Commissioners 
for the month of January was received. The 
board calls attention to the fact that the annexa^ 
tion of Chailestown, West Roxbury and Brighton 
has added to the city a very large area to be pro- 
tected against fire, and that there was at the time 
of an!?exi>,ti(>n a fo'-oe in the fire departments of 
the several towns of upwards of one hundred and 
seventy men, variously organized. The board are 
of opinion that this number is unnecessarily large, 
but that the addition of one hundred and fifty 
men should be made to the force provided for by 
the ordinance of October 13, 1873, establishing the 
Fire Department of Boston, and that this force is 
needed to properly protect those districts 
from fire. "They would respectfully recom- 
mend that the" ordinance be so amended 
as to make the force of the department 
700 men instead of 550. Appended to the report is 
a statement of the fires during the month of Jan- 
uary, of which the following is a summary: Num- 
ber of alarms 85, of which 26 were "stills" ; in the 
city proper 53, South Boston 7, East Boston 0, Rox- 
bury 11, Dorchester 5, Chailestown 6, Brighton 2, 
West Roxbury 1. Loss on buildings, $288,561 ; loss 
on stock, $174,054 48; insurance on buildings, $527,- 
600; insurance on stock, $224,180. 

On motion of Alderman Stebbins, the rei)ort was 
referred to the Committee on Ordinances. 

ORDER OF NOTICE. 

-Uderman Bigelow offered the following : 
Ordered, That due notice be given to A. W. Per- 
rin and all other parties interested that this Board 
will, on Tuesday, the twenty-fourth day of Februa- 
ry next, at four o'clock P. M., take into considera- 
tion the expediency of removing a tree standing 



54 



BOARD OF AJLDlLlRIvlElSr 



in the centre of the sidewalk in front of the estate 
owned liy said ferriii,on tlie south side of Waverley 
street, and any per, on who objects thereto will 
then and there be heard. 
Passed. 

NOMINATIONS CONFIRMED. 

On motion of Al.lci man Stebbins, the nomina- 
nations of the Mayor presented at tlie meeting on 
Monday for tlie offices (f Superintenlent of 
Lamps, l<"aneuil K:>.n, Faneiiil-Hall Marliets, 
Wagons and Trucks, Hacks and Cariiages, Intel- 
ligence Offices antl Pawnbrokers and Inspector of 
01 Milk, were taken from the table and confiimed. 

THE REPORT ON THE WATER SUPPLY. 

On motion of Al lerman Cutter, the order to 
print .WO extra copies of the report of the Water 
Board (City Doc. No. '2'J) was taken from the table. 

Alderman Cutter— I would state that the print- 
ing of this doeument will be veiy expensive; it 
will co?t $500 to print one map r.lonc. The City En- 
gineer has in his po>session some sixty copies 
which can be sent to the other bianch, and it does 
appear to me th it as theie we: e a thousand copies 
originally printed this matter siiould go the C om- 
mittep on Printing, and I therefore move that it 
be referred to that committee. 

Aldei man Power — It was intimated by some of 
the members of this Boa:d at the last meet- 
ing that perhaps the Superintendent cf Print- 
ing had gone outside the line of his duty, and 
some thought tint his action had the appearance 
of dictating to this Board. I do not suppose that 
he had any idea that the letter he wrote to me was 
going to be made pullic. As cliiiiman of the 
Committee on Printing I have requested him to 
notify me when any matters come up which affect 
that department or the interest of the city, and in 
accordance with those inst.uci,ions he s-entme 
that letter. He had no idea of dictating to this 
Board, and I would like permission to read anoth- 
er letter from him : 

Office Superintendent of Printing, ) 
Boston, Feb. tlth, 1874. ( 
Alderman Power : Dear Sir — Noticing by the 
report of Monday's meeting of the Boar 1 of Al- 
dermen, that 1 am accused of iinpropeily inter- 
fering with tbe proceedings of the City Govern- 
ment, I desire to offer the following exi'lination: 
I learned incidentally in the office of the Water 
Department — having usually the is^ue of its re- 
ports — that the propo al was pending for reprint- 
ing the Document No. 29, and that it was believed 
it had not orighiatsd in the Water Department. 
Knowing that the co'-t would be unui^uylly large, 
and would be charged to the printing appropria- 
tion, if I was rightly informed, I eon>iderei it my 
duty to notify you, as cliairman of tlie Printing 
Committee, of the nature of the order. I have 
noticed in reports of the Finance Com- 
mittee on additional appropriations asked 
for, that department officers have been cau- 
tioned to take all proper care to p. event the ap- 
propiiations f. ailing short. As the printing appro- 
priation is almost entirely disbursed under my 
supervision, an I it is doublfal whether it will be 
sufficient for the year, I coul I properly pursue no 
other coui se. '1 he first edit on of the rejo t (Doc. 
29)wa=i 1000 copies, and co^t 5.1377 37, of which 
$138 57 was charged to printing, and $738 60 to ad- 
ditional supply of wate". Tae cost of 500 addi- 
tional copies is now estimated at if-ebO. Twenty- 
flve hundred copies of a repo t on the Mystic wa- 
ter have just been conn leted, by order of the Cty 
Council, for general information, and charged lo 
printing. I was not awa;e of the want of Docu- 
ment 20 for any o her purpose than pullic ii. for- 
mation, as the report is on file in the depar ments, 
and wjU be bound in the volumes of city doju- 
ments. I respectfully disclaim any purpose of in- 
terference with the pi oceedings of ei her branch 
of the City Conned, having only endeavored to 
give proper informat on to one per.son only, with 
whom my official relaUon is such as seemed to re- 
quire it. Respectfully yours, 

George Coolidge, 
Superintendent of Printing. 

Alderman Stebbins — As the Superintendent of 
Printing report-; that the printing of five hundred 
co))ies of the report will co-t six hundred and fifty 
dollars, 1 shall move to amend the order by mak- 
ing the number three hundred, and the expense 
to be charged to the aj>propiiation for an Addi- 
tional Supi ly of Water. 

Alderman Power— llie lessening of the number 
of copies will lessen the expense but very little. 
ALf ter the type is set the expense of Ave hundred 



will be very little more than that for three hun- 
dred. 

Alderman Cutter — I should hope that if the com- 
mittee think best to have any printed at all, the 
number may be one thousand. The maj) will cost 
five hundied dollars alone. 1 hope the order will 
go to the Committee on Printing. 

Alderman Stebbins— The plate for the printing 
of the map is already in existence, and the princi- 
pal cost will be (■ etting the type for the report. 

Al ICi man Cutter — 'the City Engineer stated to 
me that the plate was not in existence. 
Al terman Stebbins renewed his amendment. 
The Chair ruled that the motion to refer took 
precedence, and the Board voted to refer the or- 
der to the Committee on Printing. 

smith's riding school. 
On motion of Alderman Hall, the motion of Al- 
derman Power to reconsider the vote giving J. M. 
Smith leave to withdraw on petition to locate a 
riding school at 1043 Washington street, was taken 
from the table. 

Alderman Hall — I have a few words to say in 
connection with this subject. The Alderman 
from Ward 12 said, at the meeting on Monday, 
that there was a gentleman connected with this 
Board who, he thouglit, coiibl give some valuable 
information on the subject of this riding school. 
It is for that purpose that 1 made the motion to 
take this subject from the table. I am, as the 
Alderman said, proprietor of a riding school on 
West Dedham street. I bought the land some- 
thing over six years ago, if my memory serves me 
righ.ly, for the purpose of a stable. At the time 
1 bought the land there was a petit:on before the 
City Government for permission to locate a stable 
there. I purchased the lot for this special pur- 
po-e, and made one payment with the distinct un- 
derstanding that if 1 failed to get permission to 
erect a stable on it I would forfeit the money then 
paid, and I did not take a deed of the land until 
after I had received permission to erect 
the stable. I paid sixi;y-two and a half cents per 
foot more for ic for this jjurpose than I could have 
bought it for to have used in other busi- 
ness. This lot was sixty feet front, and I 
bought it of the owners of the houses on Upton 
street directly in my rear. Adjoining this proper- 
ty was a lot twenty-five feet in front, occupied by 
tenement houses, and this land I bought of the 
parties who 1 vecl upon it. The next lot to that 
was thrty feet front, and it had been occupied by 
a stable, ihis lot 1 al=o purchased, making 115 
feet front by 90 deep, the size of the present build- 
ing upon it, which is six stories high. So much 
for my stable. Between my bu'lding and 1 pton 
street there is a passageway of twenty feet, and 
the yards in the rear of iliose houses are some forty 
feet deep, making a distance of sixty feet from 
my stable to those houses. I have a statement 
here of the assessed valuation of those houses on 
TJplon street from 18C9 to 1873, inclusive, which is 
as follows : 
No. of house. 1869. 1S70. 1871. 1872. 1873 

30 $13,600 $12,000 $11,000 $11,000 $11,000 

32 13,(100 12,000 11,000 11,000 11,000 

34 13,000 12,000 11,000 11,000 11,000 

36 12,000 11,000 1(1,000 10,(iUO 10,000 

38 12,(J00 11,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 

40 12,000 11,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 

42 12,000 11,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 

This f hows a depreciation of $2500 on the valua- 
tion of No. 30 and $2000 on each of the other pieces 
of piopeity in my immediate rear, with a pa- sage- 
way twenty feet and a yard of forty feet in width 
between them and my lot. I wish the Board to 
understand distii.ctly that I bought this land from 
the paities who owned and lived in those houses 
in my immediate rear. Now, then, if my stable 
has so depreciated that property, with the dis- 
tance of sixty feet between my lot and those 
houses, how much more will a stable, built after 
the plan propo- ed in this petition, depreciate 
those small houses abutting on three sides of the 
estate c-f the heirs of William Brigham, in the 
rear of 1043 W^ashington street. And my motives 
are called in question, today, because I voted 
against permittii.g this stable to be erected. 
On th ee sides of this lot are dwelling 
houses, owned and occupied by men of mod- 
erate means, who have remonstrated against 
the granting of ilie prayer of ihese petitioners. 
The la^t City Government ref useil to permit a sta- 
ble io be built upon that lot— and very justly, I 
think. At 1 hat time I was importuned to assist 
the lemonstrants, to the end that the petitioners 
might have leave to withdraw, but 1 did not do so. 
But in the present ca^e I have voted to proteci;the 



FEBR \j ARY 11 



1874= 



55 



interest of the poor against the rich, and for so 
doing I am called in question. I believe the gen- 
tlemen of this Board are far-seeing enough to 
know that no one business can thrive alone. C'om- 
petition is the life of trade, and to that end I in- 
vite all who are interested to build as many riding 
schools at the Sonth End as they may choo?e, for 
I believe it would be for my interest for them to 
do so. I believe Ihat it would be an injury to the 
business if any one per on had a monopoly of it, 
and I can fairly and honestly say that we are not 
doing as much business today as we did when there 
were two other riding schools in thi-^ city. I would 
be very glad to have more riding schools e'tabli h- 
ed. My right to vote on this f ubject ha^ been ques- 
tioned by the gem le man from Ward 12. I claim 
that I had a right to vote upon it as 1 1 bought flt, 
and without giving any reasons at o\l, unless I 
chose to do so. I voted as I did because these 
hou es are owned and occupied by persons who 
became posi-e-sed of them by honest toil. I claim 
the right always to vote to protect the poor against 
the encroachments of the rich. Many of tho?e 
houses are mortgaged for two-thirds of their 
value, and if they depreciate as much as those in 
my rear have, you will, by giving permission to 
erect this stalie, turn them from i heir comfort- 
able, honestly and hard-earned homes, pennile s 
into the street. The gentleman who has the honor 
to preside over thi« Board, in hi-; remarks, 
last Monday, said, "if ihiv do not like the sta- 
ble, let them sell out and move away." Now, 
in the name of all that is fair, is that a good 
reason? is this a fair reason, and Mliat we have a 
right to expect from such a source ? If it is satis- 
factory to him, it is not so to me, and I cannot al- 
low him to think and judge for me. As to the lo- 
cation of this stable it seems to me that the only 
means of access is a passage through an archway 
sixty feet long by eleven feet four inches wide. 
If they have any rights in Briggs plnce I would 
like to see the record produced. It has not been 
shown to this Board as yet, except by assertion. 
In last evening's Transcript I noticed a little ed- 
itorial article bearing upon this subject. It inti- 
mated that I was not doing my honest duty. I 
think such a statement, without more of the facts 
being known, and having for its basis the asser- 
tion of only one man, comes with very bad taste 
from a newspaper wliich receives $1000 a year from 
the City Governmeiit for work whicli all the pa- 
jiers do in part for nothing, and some are willing 
to do entire for a mere pittance. So much for that 
statement. 

Al lerman Power— I have listened to the gentle- 
man's explanation, and he may be satisfied with it 
himsdf, but I am not, and I do not think his con- 
stituents will be as well satisfied with it as he is. 
He has taken pains to exrdain the great sympathy 
he has for the poor people who are to be damaged 
by the erection of this stable on the Biigham estate. 
Before doing so he plainly states that he wilfully, 
knowingly runs an establishment that has depre- 
ciated the value of the property of his immediate 
neighbors. It seems to me that his argument is 
haroly consistent, that his action is inconsistfut 
with the great sympathy he expresses for the own- 
ers of those adjoining estates, 'this argument has 
been enlarged upon before by other mem). ers of 
this Eoard. What the property adjoining his rid- 
ing school is assessed for, and what itwouia bring, 
might show a different state of things. Howe vt r, 
I do not understand th^ gentleman to say that he 
considers such an estallishment a nuisance. As I 
stated at the last meeting, I thought that if any 
gentleman supposed a member of this Board pos- 
sessed more knowledge on a sui ject than anybody 
else, it was nothing but fair that we should try to 
get reliable ir.formation fiom that source, ihe 
gentleman from the Hij;hlands in enlarging upon 
the sul ject seemed to rest solely upon the ground 
that this place -was and must necessarily be a nui- 
sance, tut I do not understand the gentleman 
who has just spoken to corroborate the state- 
ment of the gentlcmnn from the Highlands, 
that such an establishment nuist necessa- 
rily be a nuisance if well conducted. Now, 
sir, one reason why I moved for a reconsideration 
of this vote, as I stated b( fo. e,was that the owners 
of this property desire to meet the proprietors of 
the adjoining estates there in as liberal a spiiit as 
possible, and to try to put up a building that would 
be a great improvement over thoe at present on 
the estate. As to the fiie risks and nuisance, thty 
would put up a bu Iding that would do away with 
the great risk and nuisance existing there now. 
Ihe gentleman from the Highlands on a former 
occasion gave some statistics as to what the ad- 



joining property is assessed at, and went on to 
show mat hs thought ihat by the erection of this 
stalie the propervy would be damaged at least 
twenty-five pt r cent. The assessors' books show 
that the block bounded by Washington street, 
Mei f ord couit, Shawmut avenue and Grot on 
stree t, including Briggs place, is valued as fol- 
lows: 

1039 Washington street $23,000 

1U4I " " 20,SU0 

lUbl " " 20,800 

1065 " " 23,000 

1043-1059 " " (Brigham heirs)... 100,000 

Back land (stable lot) " " ... 21,400 

246 Shawmut avenue 10,000 

24i " " s,600 

250 " " 8,000 

252 " " 10,400 

254 " " 10,400 

234 " " 12,V:00 

23ti " " 9,200 

238 " " 9,200 

240 " " 9,200 

242 " " 9,800 

Making a total of $303,300, of which the Brigham 
heirs aie assessed |121,400. The above-named 
estates on Shawmut avenue do not abut on the 
stal le lot and cannot be much afliected by putting 
a stable on it. 

1 Mcdf ord court $6,000 

3 " " 4,fc00 

5 " " 4,<i00 

7 " " 4.;j00 

9 " " 4,H00 

17 " " 4,800 

13 " " 6,t;00 

49 Bradford " ) these three ( 5,S00 

51 " " } do not < 5,800 

53 " " 5 abut. I ,5,800 

1 Briggs placed r 5,P00 

l !! ;; ! these six 5,300 

5 ;; " ( -^"t- ::::::::::::::::: liiTo 

6 " J I 5,800 

7 " 5,400 

8 " " 4)200 

4 Groton street 5,500 

6 '■ " 5,000 

8 " " 5,000 

10 " " 4,S;00 

12 " " sIlOO 

14 " " 5,-500 

Iti " " 4,500 

15 " " 5,.500 

20 " " 5,500 

The total valuation of the block is f 446,900 ; val- 
uation of estate of trigham he.rs, $121,400; valua- 
tion of estates not affetted, .1181,900; valuation of 
estates in any way concerned, $;l4a,G00. If the 
abutters are injured to the exi;ent of twenty-five 
per cen;-., say J5-35,900, the increased valuation will 
not be le<s than «5t0,(;00 by the stable building, 
etc. Grantirg that the gentleman's argument is 
true, that the property will depreciate twenty-five 
per cent,, it will be increased much mote than it 
is depreciated Ly the building of ihi-- staLle. But 
the adjoining estates being generally not occu- 
pied by their owners, but by many tei.iints— in 
some cafes seven in a single house — will not bs 
injured to this exi;ent, if at all. The whede num- 
ber of estates 1s 41; the whole number of tennnts 
is 92, and the number of estates occupiett by their 
owners is 13. In legard to fire, 1 wihh to say that 
the buil ling is almost incombus title. The walls 
are to be veiy thick and lef;, bare; the i^oor of the 
riding-school is to be covered wiih clay, on which 
a file might le kept burning for d;iys without 
chirriig ihe bo irels. This extends across the 
whole buillirg and effectually cuts off fire f,om 
above or 1 elow. The stal le is not to be a barn, 
and vciy lii.ile hay will be kept there, and that 
mosily in bales. Stana pipes, which will command 
the entire buildii.g, ai e 10 1 e put in ; a steam fire 
engine is located in ihe imme{iiatc vicinitv. The 
first lioor is open ; o that a hose carriage or'engine 
could run through wli hout obstacle to Briggs place. 
The loof i-i nat, is only I1f , v-oue feet high, instead 
of sixty, as ihe genii man from the Highlands stat- 
ed, ana is s unounde i by tatilements. The front 
stores are three s.ovies high, ami not five, as stated 
by thegen.l, man f.om the H ghlands. If these 
pariies can have a peimit .0 me their ceUar at 
grade seven, (having four feet drainaf.e and a 
noor paved in 1 emeiii) they can lower the total 
height nearly four feet. No horses are to be kept 
in Ihe eellar, and they 01 ly wi- h to take the grade 
of Shawmut avenue, which is four feet lower than 
Washin-lon rtreet. This was refused by the last 
Board without a hearing, as they 1 bought it was 
imi ortant that the territoiy t hould be raised 
above the grade of Shawmut avenue, so that the 



56 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



drainape shoull go into the ?ewer in Washington 
street, and prevent the drainage from the building 
going upon the premises. Now, gentlemen, here 
IS the mo<t important part of this question. These 
parties already have a permit to build this 
riding school, according to the plans, with- 
out leaving any passageway about it. 
They have stables on the premises to- 
day whinh will hold more horses than they want 
for the riding school. They do not need to put a 
single hor.'-e into this riding school. They have 
stables sufticirnt to hold as many horses as they 
want, and they can keep those stables. Now, gen- 
tlemen, what do they ask you to do? They want 
to tear down this old stable and remove any 
ground for comxilaint and wipe out any other 
nuisance that can be complained of. If you do 
not grant them permission, they can build the 
riding school according to their plans and take 
the horses into it f i om the old stablest By grant- 
ing them this permission you get rid of all those 
old stables. You refuse them permission, and all 
those old stables can be kept there and the place 
made ten times more dangerous than it would be 
if you granted the request. Let it not be mis- 
understood. They have all the stables on the 
ground that they need; so it is for you to say 
whether you will continue a nuisance there, or 
have it removed. That, gentlemen, is the only 
question before this Board— whether the owners 
of this property shall be permitted to pull down 
these old stables and put up a larger and lietter 
one, leaving more space clear. They have altered 
their plans since they came before this Board, so 
as to leave a passageway on the westerly side for 



a hose carriage, engine or ladders, giving up some 
seven or eight hundred feet of their land to meet 
the objections that some gentlemen have raised 
here, so that the real danger of fire now comes 
from their neighbors and not from them. The ar- 
gument that light and air will be cut off or dimin- 
ished, I do not think should be considered for one 
moment by this Board, for the neighboring houses 
certainly have no riglit to the light and air they 
get from this land remaining vacant. I do not 
suppose any member of this Board would vote 
against allowing them to build a church or a 
theatre a hundred feet high if they desired to do 
so. 

Alderman Harris— I rise to ask if the Alderman 
is willing to give way and allow the matter to lie 
upon the table till the next meeting. I, for one, 
desire more information on the subject. 

Alderman Power — I am jjerfectly willing to al- 
low it to lie upon the table until the gentleman 
gets information on the subject. Some of the 
members have said that if more space were left 
about that building they might be induced to 
change their votes, and I thought that since the 
subject had been called up, some gentlemen 
might desire to decide it today. Allow me to 
state again that these petitioners have leave to 
erect this building, and also that they have sta^ 
bles on the premises amply sufficient to keep all 
the horses that they want. 

On motion of Aluerman Harris, the motion to 
reconsider was laid upon the table. 

On motion of Alderman Harris, the Board ad- 
journed. 



i ; 
i i 



57 



COIVEMON COUNCIL, 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

FEBRUARY 12, 1874. 



The regular weekly meeting was held at half- 
past seven o'clock P. M., E. O. Shepard, President, 
in the chair. 

PAPEUS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Auditor's monthly exhibit for January, and 
quarteily leports oif Overseers of the Poor and 
Superintendent of City Scales in Haymarket 
scjuare. Severally placed on file. 

Petitions of Thomas W. Carter, C.J. Donovan 
& Co., Dnvid H. Uaney, Alonzo F. Neale, et al., 
George Ellis & Co. et al., and W. H. Jackson et al. 
Severally ref .nred in concurrence. 

Report and order authorizing the Treasurer to 
horrow $100,000, to be added to loan for extension 
of Devon-hire street to Dock square. Referred 
to Committee on Finance. 

Order authorizing: the purchase of necessary 
furniture and supplies for City Engineer's Depart- 
ment. Read once. 

Order for the approval for payment, from the 
appropriation for a new supply of watei", of tlie 
expenses incurred in prociiring necessary 
information concerning such supply. Passed un- 
der a suspension of the rules, on motion of Mr. 
Pea e of Ward 1. 

Order to jiay W. Smifh and P. F. McGaragle, for 
the erection of the Smallpox Hospital on Swett 
street, $5000, the amount paid into the city treas- 
ury on account of in'-urance on the building in ex- 
cess of the amount advanced by the city, whUe 
the work was in progress. Read once. 

Reoort and order •'uhorizing a transfer from 
the Reserved Fund to the apj ropriation for Com- 
mon, etc., of $760; to ihat for Survey, etc., of 
Buil'iings, $3300; to that for House of Correction, 
$10,000. Read once. 

Request for additional appropriation for the 
Committee on Bridges. Referred to the Commit- 
tee on Finance. 

The order for the printing of Ave hundred addi- 
tional copies of the reiort of the Water Board on 
an additional supply of water (City Doc. No. 29 of 
1873) came down referred to the Committee 
on Printing. The Council voted to recede and 
concur. 

Monthly report of the Board of Fire Commis- 
sioners. Referred to the Committee on Ordi- 
nances. 

ELECTION OF FIRST-ASSISTANT-ASSESSORS. 

Report of Committee on Assessors' Department 
nominating thirty-lhree First- Assistant-As? ess- ors 
and certificate of the election on the part of the 
Board of Aldermen, of Benjamin F. Palmer, Wil- 
liam J. Ellis, Michael Carney, E Iward F. Robin- 
son, P. Ambrose Young, Edwin B. Spinney, 
Charles E. Jackson, William H. Cundy, Charles 
Nowf U, George F. Williams, Otis Rich, George F. 
Davis, Andrew J. Browne, L. Foster Morse, Phin- 
eas B. Smith, William Withington, John L. Brig- 
ham, Henry Pierce, John Brown, Roger H. Scan- 
nell, Joseph R. Grose, George A. Comins, Gideon 
Walker, Judson Chapin, Theophilus Burr, Joshua 
S. Duncklee, William B. Long, Nahum Chapin, 
George S. Pendergast, Richard J. Fennelly, John 
H. Giblin, Jo-eph L. Drew and James Healy. 

On motion of Mr. Shaw of Ward 5, the rules re- 
quiring the nominations to lie over one week were 
suspended, and the Council voted to proceed to an 
election for First-Assistant-Assessors. 

Messrs. Shaw of Ward 5, Woo Is of Ward 8, and 
Davis of Ward 14 were apjjointed a committee to 
receive, sort and count votes. They reported as 
follows : 

Whole number of votes 72 

Necessary for a ch oice 37 

Benjamin F. Palmer 69 

William J. Ellis 72 

Michael Carney 72 

Edward F. Robinson 70 

P. Ambrose Young 70 

Edwin 1'. Spinney 66 

Charles E. Jackson 65 

Josi'ph L. Dre w 60 

William H. Cundy 70 

Charles Nowell 72 

GeorKo F. Williams 72 

Otis Rich 72 

George F. Davis 71 



Andrew J. Browne 71 

L. Foster Morse 72 

Phineas B. Simth 69 

William Withington 66 

John L. Brigham 71 

Henry Pierce 71 

John Brown 65 

Roger H. Seannell 59 

Joseph R. Grose 67 

James Healey 51 

George A. Comins 64 

Gideon Walker 72 

Judson Chapin 70 

Theophi lus Burr 6.5 

Joshua S. Duncklee 71 

William B. Long 72 

Nahum Chapin 58 

George S. Pendergast 72 

John H. Giblin 49 

Richard J. Fennelley 29 

A. G. Wvman 49 

H. N. Holbrook 26 

C. E. Grant 22 

I. F. Atwood 18 

G. H. Wniiams 14 

A. J. Locke 14 

A. R. Holden 8 

A. G. Bartlett 7 

J. M. Maguire 6 

William Gallagher 5 

K. Vose, Jr 2 

A. D. Capen 1 

M. P. McCarty 1 

The first thirty-two-named gentlemen were de- 
clared elected in concurrence, and A. G. Wyman 
was declared elected in non-concurrence. 

Mr. Crowley of Ward 7 — In connection with the 
name of Mr. Wyman I raise the point that he is 
not eligible for the office of assessor, for the rea- 
son that he is employed in the Treasury Depart- 
ment, at a salary of sixteen hundred dollars a 
year. It strikes me that his election is in direct 
opposition to a statute law enacted a year or two 
ago, which forbids his holding such a position. I 
therefore raise the point that the President can- 
not declare him elected, on account of this legal 
restriction. 

• The President — It is impossible for the Chair to 
declare him ineligible. His ineligibility wUl have 
to be determined otherwise. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order for flags to he displayed and a national 
salute to be flred at East and South Boston, the 
city proper, tlie Highlands, Dorchester, West Rox- 
bury. Brighton and Charlestown, ?t noon, on the 
23d inst., in commemoration of the birthday of 
George Washington. Passed— yeas 60, nays 0. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 

The annual report of the City Solicitor (City 
Doe. No. 14), containing a list of all the suits and 
legal proceedings to which the city of Boston is 
party, pending at the time of his last report, or 
since instituted, with a statement of the causes of 
action, the courts wherein the several cases are 
pending, and the action that has been had in them 
respectively, was received. Sent up. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 

The annual report of the City Engineer (City 
Doc. No. 20) was received, and ordered sent up. 

Statement of expenses paid from the dei^art- 
ment appropriation — Amount of appropriation 
for 1872-73 expended from January to May, 1873, 
$6068 86 ; amount of appropriation 'for 18734, $24,- 
000 00; total, $30,068 86. Salaries of City Engineer, 
assistants, draughtsmen and rodmen, $20,431 83; 
instruments and repairs of same, $244 50; drawing 
paper and material-;, $630 07; stationery, printing 
stock, etc., $326 52; reference books and map 
frames, $140 75; printing and advertising, $18 21; 
horse, $350 00; travelling expenses, horse-keeping, 
etc., $655 52; incidental expenses, $260 73; total 
expenditures, $23,058 13; unexpended balance, 
January 1, 1874, $7010 73. 

The following statement shows the amounts paid 
for engineering from special appropriations since 
Jan. 1, 1873: Water works, $1996 47; widening 
streets, $31 15; Chelsea-street Bridge, $414 50; 
Federal-street Bridge, $105 50; West Boston and 
Canal bridges (one-half to be paid by Cambridge), 
$226 25. Total engineering expense for 1873, 
$25,832. The number of persons employed and 
paid from the department appropriation was, on 
the first of January, 1873 (including the City En- 
gineer), 16. The present number is 19. The engi- 
neering force engaged upon the work pertaining 
to "additional supply" is paid by the Water 
Board, and, although under the immediate direc- 
tion of the City Engineer, is distinct from the 
force of this department. The large amount of 
work required by the great number and magnitude 



FE BR IJ AR Y 12 



1874 



58 



of projected improvements, and the largely in- 
creased territory to be covered, due to annexa- 
tion, will undoubtedly necest^itate the forming of 
new parties, and a consequent addition to the 
number of employes during the coming year. 

The following statements give the operations of 
the department of the past year, together with 
such description of works, finished or in prog- 
ress, as is thought to be of general interest: 

Sudbury Eiver and Lake. Cochituate. No water 
has been drawn from the Sudbury River during 
the past year. On Jan. 1, 1873, the water in Lake 
Cochittiate stood at twelve feet one inch above 
the bottom of the conduit. At the beginning of 
the previous year there was no water in store, the 
conduit being then supplied by pumping from a 
level below its flow line. To maintain the supply 
about 1,G76,C00,000 gallons were turned into the 
lake from Sudbury River; this, combined with the 
copious rains of the latter part of the year, 
brought the water level within about fifteen 
inches of high-water mark at the beginniug of 
1873. From this date it rose gradually till Jan. 17, 
when waste over the dam commenced and contin- 
ued till April 23, the water then standing at twelve 
feet eleven and one-half inches. On May 4 the 
stop planks were again removed and the water 
allowed to waste till May 20. From this time till 
Augu.st 14 the water gradually fell, and at the lat- 
ter date stood at eight feet seven inches; on 
August 27 it stood at eiglit feet nine and one-half 
inches; September 4, six feet eight and one-half 
inches; October 10, seven feet six inches; October 
19, seven feet three inches, and on December 31, 
nine feet nine inches. 

To secure a flow that will supply the city with 
the rate of consumption of the past year, there are 
required from six to seven and a half feet of water 
above the bottom of the conduit, and, as in Sep- 
tember there were less than seven feet, fears were 
entertained that a resort to pumping would again 
be required, but fortunately heavy rains furnished 
the needed relief. The total waste over the dam 
for the year has been 2,917,977,000 gallons, equal to 
an average daily supply of 7,994,460 gallons. Had 
there been no aid from the Sudbury River the pre- 
\'ious year, the waste in 1873 would have been 
equal to an average daily supply of about 3,400,000 
gallons. This waste is due to the want of storage 
room, yet that afforded by the Cochituate Lake is 
much greater in proportion to its drairiage area 
than it is usually possible lo secure for the water 
sources of this portion of the country, and in fact 
is more than sufficient to make available all the 
water that can be collected in a season of extreme 
drought. 

Conduit. On November 19 and 20 a thorough 
examination of the interior of the conduit was 
made by Mr. Wiggin, clerk of the Water Board, 
and others, who passed through its entire length 
from the lake to Chestnut-Hill Reservoir. A num- 
ber of new and dangerous cracks were discovered; 
those on the embankment to the west of Charles 
River were of such alarming character that it was 
considered imperative they should be repaired at 
once ; accordingly the water was kept shut off and 
a force of masons kept at work night and day un- 
til temporary security was insured. At this point 
there was found a crack in the bottom varjing in 
width from one-lialf to one and a half inches, and 
two hundred feet long, through which an iron rod 
readily passed and penetrated the gravel filling 
below. The leakage here must have been consid- 
erable, but it did not make its appearance at the 
surface of the bank, owing to the very porous nat- 
ure of the material forming it. 

The repairs made in no way add to the strength 
of the conduit ; the best that could be done was to 
stop the leakage and thus remove for a while the 
danger of undermining the masonry. 

Consumption. The average daily consumption 
for each month of 1873 has been as follows : 

January 17,639,100 gallons. 

February 18,4«1,000 " 

March 15,983,700 " 

April 14,781,800 

May 17,637, 400 

June 20,100,600 

July 20,917,100 

August 19,544,600 

September 19,572,700 " 

October 17,113,800 " 

November 16,633,400 " 

December 15,727,100 " 

The average for the year is 17,842,700 gallons,— 
an increase of 2,779,300 gallons, or I8V2 per cent. 
above that for 1872. On July 20 observations were 
made at the Beacon Hill Reservoir, to determine 
the rate of night consumption, or more properly 



speaking, the rate of waste, in a certain district of 
the city. 

This district comprises what is called the West 
End, Nortli End and burnt district, and contains 
not far from eighty thousand inhabitants. In it 
are located many of the manufacturing houses, 
principal hotels, newspaper offices, printing 
houses, etc., of the city ; but at the time selected 
for the experiment — between twelve and three 
o'clock Sunday morning — the legitimate use of 
water must have been very small. This section 
was shut off from all communication with the 
Brookline and Chestnut-Hill reservoirs by gates 
on Bedford, Washington, Tremout, Charles and 
other streets, and fed exclusively from the Bea- 
con-Hill Reservoir. The leakage through the 
gates, if any, must have been inappreciable, as the 
pressures on opposite sides could have differed 
but slightly. Observations Avere commenced at 
midniglit, and readings of the gauge taken every 
fifteen minutes. At the first of the experiment 
the consumption was found to be somewhat irreg- 
ular, but between one and three o'clock it was 
remarkally uniform, showing that the draft was 
not due to irregular opening and shutting of 
cocks, but to a continuous flow at almost unvary- 
ing outlets. 

There were drawn from the reservoir during 
these two hours 386,857 gallons, equal to a rate of 
4,642,284 gallons in twenty-four hours. This enor- 
mous rate of night consumption indicated either 
a heaA'y leakage or great waste. A party of in- 
spectors was at once organized, under the direc- 
tion of Mr. Joseph Whitney of Cambridge, who, 
from experience gained in searching for leaks on 
the Cambridge works, was paiticularly qualified 
for this work, and a careful inspection of all the 
fittings in the district was made, and the street 
mains were tested for lealjs in various ways. No 
leaks were discovered in the mains, but many 
hundreds of defective fittings were found and re- 
paired, and some leaks in the house service-pipes 
detected and stopped. Before the examination 
was concluded, however, it became manifest that 
much the greater portion of the night consump- 
tion was caused by waste, that is, by flow- 
through fittings left open either carelessly or wil- 
fully. All the leaks that could be discovered hav- 
ing been stopped, a second observation was made 
on Sunday morning, October 5, between the hours 
of twelve and three, as before. The water in the 
reservoir at the commencement of the trial stood 
at the same height as on the morning of July 20. 

There was a slight wind blowing at the time of 
the latter tri 1, which caused an oscillation in the 
gauge-tube, and the readings were not so satisfac- 
tory as those of July. During the three hours of 
observation the water fell 2 feet 4% inches, show- 
ing a consumption of 506,182 gallons, which is at 
the rate of 4,049,456 gallons in 24 hours. The con- 
sumption between one and three o'cL ck was 336,- 
294 gallons, or at the rate of 4,035,528 gallons in 24 
hours, showing a small saving, about 13 per cent., 
caused by the repairs made. 

The greater portion of the remainder of the con- 
sumption must have been caused by waste. 

Reservoirs. Although during the summer the 
conduit was used under a pressure greater than 
was deemed safe, yet it was found impossible to 
maintain the level of the reservoirs at a greater 
height than within four or five feet of high-water 
mark. The Beacon-Hill, South Boston and East 
Boston reservoirs, though kept partially filled with 
water, to be used in case of necessity, have been 
shut off from the distributing system of pipes for 
the past year. 

The report gives an account of the location of 
the Parker-Hill Reservoir, the total amount ex- 
pended upon which, to date, is $9902 89. 

Pumps. — The high-service engines have con- 
tinued to work well during the yei3r, and though 
in the morning hours they have been run at , 
high speed, no failure has occurred. The average 
daily amounts jjumjied during each month of the 
year have been as follows : 

January 1 ,027,102 gallons. 

February 1,078,692 " 

March 1,004,701 

April 979,099 " 

May 9,39,431 " 

June 1,059,176 " 

July 1,049,775 " 

August '■49,938 " 

September 1,061,706 " 

October... 1,059,964 " 

November 1,013,751 

December 1,062,920 " 

Distributing System,. Considerable work has 
been done during the past year in extending the 



59 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



street pipes, more particularly in the Highland 
and Dorchester districts, and important changes 
have been made in the old system of distribution, 
especially in the ('ity i)ro'per. Many of these 
changes were recommended in the last annual re- 
port of the City Engineer to the Water Board, 
others have been marked out in sijecial reports 
made in response to orders of the Cfity Council or 
of the Water Board, and others still have been 
suggested by the experience of an inadequate sup- 
ply at certain points, either for fire or other pur- 
poses. Altliough much has been done already in 
this direction, more remains to be done. There 
bar lately i>e,»ii let undei ai'thority frjm the City 
Council, a contract for about 3500 tons of pipes, 
to be used in replacing old pipes by new ones of 
much larger calibre. These will be chiefly used 
as sub-mains and feeders, and all the hydrants re- 
moved in laying them will be replaced by those of 
the Lowry pattern. 

Eirly in the season plans and estimates were 
made for repiping the "burnt district" and an 
appropriation of $85,000 for this purpose was made 
by the City Council. This work is now nearly 
finished. A large number of the streets in this 
district were re))iped with twelve and eight-inch 
pipes in place of six-inch, ami the plan requires 
all the olrl tuberculate<l pipes to be taken up, to 
make room for new pipes coated with coal tar. 
The new system his a c ip icity of delivery several 
times greater than the old, even if, for the latter, 
no deduction for tuberculation be made, and is 
provided with Lowry hydrants placed at distances 
apart never exceeding 260 feet, and generally 
fallin<^ much below this. In place of eighty of 
the oil three-inch hydrants, 113 Lowry hydrants 
with nine-incli barrels have been or v\?ill be sub- 
stituted. The former accommodated but one 
steamer, the latter will accommodate four; hence 
it will be seen the f icilities for extinguishing fires 
have been very largely increased. The changes 
made have given an improved head or pressure 
throughout the district. 

The report gives some of the more important im- 
provements that have been made in the system. 

Pipe Plans, etc. A large amount of work has 
been done during the past year in the preparation 
of plans showing the sizes, location, etc., of pipes, 
hydrants, and other appurtenances to the street 
system of distribution. 

Additional Supply. A report bearing date Jan. 
27,1813, together with plans and estimates relat- 
ing to the various sources within fifty miles of 
the city, available for the supply of Boston, and 
giving in detail the proposeil scheme of works 
for a sunply from Sudbury River, was presented 
to the Water Board in that month. This report, 
together with one from Mr. Chesbrough, City En- 
gineer of Chicago, and another from the Water 
Board upon the same subject, was presented to 
the City Council early in the year. The plan pro- 
posed received the approval of the City Govern- 
ment, and an appropriation of $500,000 was made 
to cover the estimated expenses of the past year. 
A number of engineering assistants were engaged 
early in May, and placed under the direction of 
Mr, A. Fteley, who was apnointed Resident Engi- 
neer in charge of the whole work, and the final 
location of the conduit line, dam?, etc., and plans 
of structures, and forms of contracts and speci- 
fications were commenced. The line is now lo- 
cate!, and cross sections of the ground have been 
taken, and a large number of pLins, profiles, etc., 
have been pre >ared. A contract, amounting to 
about $340,003, for excavating a tunnel and build- 
ing a portion of the conduit, was let early in Au- 
gust, aiid considirable work has been done under 
it. Other portions of the work were made ready 
for CO 1 tract, and advertisements for proposals 
woull have been male last fill, had not the ac- 
tion of the City Council rendered such course un- 
warrantable. 

In O 'tober surveys and plans of certain lands in 
the vnlley of the Sudbury were made, for the pur- 
pose of preparing papers for the taking of such 
linds. It wa--, however, derided by tlie City Solic- 
itor tliat the Ciiy Council had not authorized the 
Water Board to take lands or water rights; and 
accordingly th<3 Board made application, October 
20, for the neetlf ill authority. Charlestown, with 
its water supply, had recently been annexed by 
vote of the people, and the strong argument urged 
in f Ivor of an lexation had been the use of the 
Mystic water for the partial supi)ly of Boston, and 
the ton«equent postponement for a number of 
years of the large expenditure required for the 
Duil ling of the Su Ibury River works, as projected. 
Under the circumstances, it was thought best by 



the City Council, before granting the power asked 
for, to have made a more thorough investigation 
of the capacity and purity of the water of the 
Mystic Valley, and accordingly an order was i)ass- 
ed requiring the Water Board' to enter into fur- 
ther examination on these points. For this pur- 
pose the board engaged the services of Mr. J. P. 
Kirkwood of Brooklyn, Mr. J. B. Francis of Low- 
ell, and Professor E. N. Horsford of Cambridge. 
The studies have been completed and the reports 
made. 

Farm Pond. During the month of February 
Mr. Brackett of this office made a survey, with 
soundings, of Farm Pond, in Framinghain, and 
prepared a plan, on a scale of one hundred feet to 
an inch, showing the soundings and nature of the 
bottom, and giving contour lines for each foot in 
depth. 

The report gives a statement in detail of the 
condition of the bridges within the city limits, 
and the repairs needed. An appendix contains 
reports on the engineers in charge of the bridges 
between Boston and Cambridge and others, and 
the special reports on the Broadway and other 
bridges. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED. 

By Mr. Collins of Ward 2— Petition of SUas 
Pierce and 970 others, for the location of a 
steam fire engine somewhere between Haymar- 
ket square and the Custom House. Referred, on 
motion of Mr. Collins, to the Board of Fire Com- 
missioners. 

By Mr. Warren of Ward 12— Petition of the In- 
spector of Buildings, for authority to appoint 
three additional insiiectors. Referred, on motion 
of Mr. Warren, to the Committee on Survey and 
Inspection of Buildings. 

REPORTS AND ORDERS SUBMITTED. 

By Mr. Burditt of Ward 16— Report from the 
Joint Standing Committee on Public Buildings, of 
action upon an order of the City Council, dated 
Dec. 12, 1873, to remove the old Mather School- 
house from its present position to a city lot on 
Highland street. In order to ascertain the cost, 
the committee have received proposals for moving 
and fitting up the building for school purposes, 
and find that the expense of the same, together 
with the necessary grading and filling, as estimat- 
ed, will be nine thousand dollars ; said expendit- 
ure not being contemplated in the yearly appro- 
priation for Schoolhouses, Public Buildings, and 
the amount reinaining of said appropriation being 
only sufficient for the ordinary repairs and ex- 
penditures, they would recommend that the same 
be provided for in the new appropriation for 
1874-75. In pursuance of which they offer the 
accompanying order: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings be authorized to remove the Old Mather 
Schoolhouse from its present position to the city 
lot on Highland street, and fit up the same for 
school purposes, also jierform the necessary grad- 
ing at an estimated cost of nine thousand dollars, 
the expense to be charged to the appropriation 
for schoolhouses, public buildings. 

The question was on giving the order a second 
reading. 

Mr. Denny of Ward 9 — I believe the report rec- 
ommends that this expense be provided for in the 
estimates for approjiriations for 1874-5. Is that 
correct? 

The President— Tliat is the recommendation of 
the report. 

Mr. Denny of Ward 9— If the appropriation for 
Schoolhouses, Public Buildings, for the present 
year, is exhausted, I do not see how it can be 
charged to that appropriation, as stated in the 
order. It appears to me that the report and the 
order are inconsistent with each other. The re- 
port recommends that the expense be provided 
for in the appropriation for the coming year, and 
the order provides that the expense shall be 
charged to the appropriation for the present year. 
IX the appropriation for the present year is ex- 
hausted there is no way of meeting this expendi- 
ture. It seems to me that the order is not written 
correctly. 

Mr. Burditt of Ward 16— There is no inten- 
tion of doing anything mentioned in that order 
that will come under this year's appropriation. 
The order is intended simply to give authority to 
do the work when the proper time comes, and 
that will not be until it is arranged for by the 
next year's appropriation. If tlie committee 
should be able to arrange so that it will be paid 
for out of ne.xt year's appropriation, and a proper 
opportunity should be offered, the work may be 



Fi:BRUARY 12 



1874, 



60 



done before the close of the present financial year, 
but not unless it is to be paid for out of next year's 
appropriation. 

The order was laid over under the rule. 

By Mr. Shaw of "Ward 5— Majority report from 
the joint special committee appointed to nomi- 
nate candidates for Overseers of the Poor, signed 
by Aldermen Bigelow and Harris and Councilman 
Goldthwait, recommending the election of Thomas 
C. Amory, Liverus Hull, Ira Allen and Samuel B. 
<^raf t, to fill vacancie-s occiirring in the board on 
the first Monday of April next. 

Mr. Shaw— As these nominations will lie over 
under the rule, I wish to state, in behalf of my 
associate, the gentleman from Ward 16 (Mr. 
Perkins), that we shall join in a minority report, 
which will be presented at the next meeting of 
the Council. 

The nominations were laid over. 

By Mr. Siblpy of Ward 21— 

Ordered, That the wharf on Medford street, 
opposite Elm street, (Ward 21), together with all 
other i)ublic lands and buildings in the districts 
recently annexed to Boston, noc in charge of any 
department, be placed under the care and manage- 
ment of the Committee on Public Lands. 

Passed. 

By Mr. Pease of Ward 1 — 

Ordered, That so much of the report of the 
Water Registrar contained in the appendix to City 
Document No. 134, of the year 1873, as relates to 
changes in the present water rates, be referred 
to the Joint Standing Committee on Water. 

Passed. 

By Mr. Loring of Ward 12— 

Ordered, That the Committee on Ordinances be 
requested to prepare and submit to the City Coun- 
cil a draft of an ordinance providing for the re- 
moval of snow and ice from the roofs of buildings 
in this city, as authorized by chapter 86 of the acts 
of the year 1863. 

Passed. 

WILSON'S HOTEL, BRIGHTON. 

Mr. Dean of Ward 12 submitted the following: 

The Committee of the Common Council on the 
Judiciary, who were instructed to obtain the 
opinion of the City Solicitor as to the legaliiy of 
the purchase of the Wilson Hotel property, so 
called, in Brighton, beg leave to submit herewith 
a communication from the City Solicitor covering 
the information desired. 

City Solicitor's Opfioe, 1 
Boston, Feb. 12, 1874. ) 

Sir — In obedience to fche request of the Commit- 
tee on the Judiciary of the Common Council, I 
have examined the records of tiie town of Brigh- 
ton pertaining to the purchase of the estate called 
WU-on's Hotel, and al^o the deed by which the es- 
tate was conveyed to the town, and I find them all 
to be in due form. I therefore entertain no doubt 
that both the purchase and the conveyance are le- 
gally valid, and that this ciiy i^ now the owner in 
fee of the estate. Very respcc fully. 

Your obedient servant, 

J. P. Hbaly. 

Hon. Benjamin Dean, Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on the Judiciary. 

The report was accepted. 

On motion of Mr. Burditt of Ward 16, the order 
for the occupant of Wilson's Hotel, AVard 19, to be 
- notitie 1 to vacate said premises on or before the 
first of April next, was taken from the tal Ic. 

The question was on the passage of the order, 

Mr. Shaw c* Wa^^d 5— Im 3 or.^ el -e seems tc be 
ready to say anything on this matter. The City 
Solicitor has statecf just what I supposed he 
would — that the deeds had passed and were prop- 
erly drawn. I never supposed that there wa* any 
doubt about that. I want to lie informed if it is 
competent for us to know how we came by that 
property. I have not any doubt but that the City 
Solicitor hns done his duty in the premises, 
has examined the papers and finis them 
correct. I did not suppose that this mat- 
ter would be considered tonight. There is 
something behind this which I want to 
reach. I stated at the la^t meeting that the books 
and papers of the town of Brigh on had not been 
received by the City Clerk of Boston, as provi led 
bylaw. Within twelve hours af>er Jiat time the 
books — or a portion of them, at least — were re- 
ceived at City Hall, but I have as yet been unable 
to make as thorough an examination of the 
resords as I desired. Notwilh-^tanding what the 
Ciiy Solicitor says— and he merely looks at the 
legal point,— there is yet a question behind the 
whole of this, which I think we ought to know. I 



desire to know how the city came by this property. 
I know, as every one else who knows anythmg at 
all about it is aware, that upon the face of it this 
property came as a part of the i)roperty of Brigh- 
ton. Since I was here a week ago I have been 
waited upon by a considerable nuiiiber of citizens 
of Brighton, and I have heard such stories as I am 
unwilling to believe are true. Whetlief or 
not they are true I am bound to ascer- 
tain if I can. If they are true we ought 
to know it, and if untrue we ouglit to know that. 
There is every reason to believe that something or 
other has been done under cover; that after an- 
nexation had become a fixed fact, after Brighton 
had virtually become a portion of Boston, acts 
were done wliich will not, I am told on good au- 
thority, bear the light of investigation. Now, sir, 
unless time is allowed to get at the root of this thing, 
I think this order ought not to pass. I hope a fair 
consideration of the subject will be giver and I 
wish to know a reason for the passage of the order 
at this time. Having said this much I hope the 
Council will let the matter lie over, because l)e- 
tween this and the next meeting of the Council 
there will be time to examine the records and find 
out how the city of Boston has been treated by 
some of her nevv citizens. I certainly would not 
do injustice to any citizen of BriglitonJ but I know 
there are a good many residents of that ward who 
are dissatisfied with tlie manner in which things 
were carried on after the act of annexation had 
passed. 

Mr. Burditt of Ward 16 — I do not rise to make 
any objection to an investigation of the subject 
referred to by the gentleman from Ward 5, but I 
do not see how it will affect the proceedings con- 
templated in this order. There is no doubt that 
the building known as Wilson's Hotel is at present 
occupied for a purpose for which it should not be 
used, and all this order contemplates is for the 
closing of the hotel and stopping the use of the 
building. I cannot see how this order can affect 
the investigation, which can be provided for in a 
separate order. As the time is getting short, I 
should hope that the order will pass tonight. If 
it is delayed we may lose another month. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5—1 have been informed that 
the present tenant has paid his rent in advance, 
and therefore has a rigiit to hold the property. 
There is, I suppose, no other opportunity to speak 
upon this question unless I move for a joint spe- 
cial committee to investigate this matter, which I 
may be called upon to do. I see nothing to be 
gained by the passage of this order. I asked the 
City Treasurer the otlier day if he knew about the 
rent. He had seen parts of the record and re- 
ceipts, and had been shown that the present tenant 
or occupant had paid for the use of the property 
for some considerable time, whether for one 
month or less, I cannot say. But here is a 
piece of property which cost the city of 
Boston $75,000, in a recent transaction, and a trade 
was made letting it to the tenant for $200 per 
month. Now, what rate of interest on $75,000 is 
$200? That is as practical as a b c. If that is a 
straightforward transaction I shall give up any idea 
of what is fair. These remarks are not properly inci- 
dental to the subject, and perhaps are out of or- 
der, but I give a reason for the faith that is in 
me. There is something wrong tliere, and unless 
I am satisfied that it is right I shall i)ropose, after 
this order passes, and move for a joint special com- 
mittee to investigate this subject. But I prefer 
that this order shall lie upon tlie table at present. 

Mr. Denny of Ward 9—1 would like to ask the 
gentleman from Ward 5 whether the facts which 
he knows and on wdiich he is not vet i)rei)ared to 
express an opinion to the Council, would have 
anything to do with the action proposed tonight. 
I hardly see how they wUl have any bearing at a 11. 
He states what this tenant has received for a 
lease of the property, and this order contemplates 
the cancelling of that lease on the first of April, 
and get a bad bargain off our hands. Then, if 
these facts which the gentleman refers to are all 
true, I cannot see what they will have to do with 
this order. 

On motion of Mr. Perkins of Ward 16, the rule 
was suspended so as to allow Mr. Shaw to pro;eed. 

Mr. Shaw— I do not desire to state all I know 
tonight, and I do not propose to. I know more 
than 1 wish I did. It is a very proper question 
which my friend has asked, but there are times 
and occasions when men do not want to tell all 
they know, and this is such an occasion for me. I 
would not have risen to sav anything had it not 
been for the apparent attempt to press the order 
through, and I cannot see anything to be 



61 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



gained by putting It through tonight. The 
1st of April is tar ahead. I prefer to say 
nothing, at present. I only hope tlie matter 
will lie over. If I can purhue the investigation 
and find anything right or wrong, I can state the 
result, and let it hit vifhere it will. There is some- 
thing wrong, I am confident, but I should very 
much prefer to have the matter rest at present. I 
have been waited upon by gentlemen from Brigh- 
ton, who have recently been assessors, and have 
held Oiher important offices in the town of Brigh- 
ton. It may be that they have been misinformed, 
and I prefer to wait until I have learned exactly 
what are the facts and merits, or demerits, of the 
case. 

Mr. Pease of Ward 1— In order that the gentle- 
man may have time for an investigation and find 
out whether or not there is a cat in tlie meal, I 
move that this subject be specially assigned for 
next Tluirsday evening, at half -past eight o'clock. 

It was so ordered. 

THE WATER SUPPLY. 

Mr. Minot of Ward 17 offered the following: 

Ordered, That the Joint Standing Committee on 
Water consider and report on the' expediency of 
ascertaining by analysis the pixrityof the water of 
Charles River at the most expedient point for tak- 
ing The same for the use of the city of Boston. 

Mr. Minot — 1 do not wish to detain the Council 
by anticipating the thorough discussion which I 
hoi)e will take place upon this whole matter of the 
water supply. There is another order which I 
have sent to tlie Chair which bears on the same 
subject, and I should be glad to have it read at 
the same time. 

The I'resident read — 

Ordered, That the Joint Standing Committee on 
Water consider and report as to the expediency of 
ascertaining the number of mills, and tlie average 
amount of water required daily by each, on 
Charles and Sudbury rivers, respectively, as a 
means of obtaining an approximate estimate of 
the water damages which will be caused by mak- 
ing use of these rivers for a water supply. 

Mr. Minot of Ward 17— As I have said, I do not 
wish to anticipate the discu^ssion which may take 
place on this subject, and which I hope will be a 
very thorough one ; nor do I seek by this order to 
interfere in any way with the plans which have 
been proposed by other members. I understand 
the emergency in which we are placed. The persons 
who depend upon the present water supply are 
about two hundred and fifty thousand. They abso- 
lutely require eighteen millions of gallons a day. 
Experience shows that, even under tlie restrictive 
rules under which they now use it, no le-^s a supply 
is suffi(-ient. We are also informed by the Com- 
missioners that Cochituate Lake can be depended 
on for only sixteen mil! ion gallons daily, and fur- 
thermore that the conduit may fail us at any mo- 
ment and leave the city of Boston iiartially, if not 
wholly, without a supply of water. A computa- 
tion is made in tlie report as to the amount of 
water wliich will be required in a given number of 
J ears from tills time; in making which, it seems 
to me, the Kngineer has erred on the side of con- 
servatism. I think he has stated it very mod- 
erately. The pOiiulatiou now depending on the 
present water supply is two hundred and fifty 
thousand. According to tlie estimate of Messrs. 
K'rkwood and Francis, the uui'iber in 1900 
will be six hundred and fifty thousand per- 
sons, who, if tliey u^e water only in the 
re -trictive manner tliat tliey do now, would re- 
quire forty-five million gallons daily. That sup- 
ply would not be sufticient for the Fire Depart- 
ment, liaiul hose, or the thousand uses or luxuries 
which we might desire anil hope to enable our cit- 
izens to make of it. As I understand the rejiort — 
and I have endeavored to get as thorough famil- 
iarity with it as possible— the present supply in 
Sudbury River will produce forty million gallons 
daily at the outside. No further supply from that 
source can be hoped for. We are not given to 
suppose that it is capable, at any time, of produc- 
ing a greater supply. At the same time, tlie com- 
mi-sioners say, that, exclusive of water damages, 
the construction of those works will cost five mil- 
lion dollars. The other scheme is that connected 
with Charles River. I should have said that it has 
been ascertained that the puriiy of the Sudbury Riv- 
er is such that the water would be entirely fit for the 
purposes for which we design to use it. As to 
Charles River, they say that the capacity for stor- 
age is limited, but that the supply would be four- 
teen million gallons daily, and that a supply of 
forty-five millions daily can be obtained at an ex- 
pense of three million dollars. But they say the 



purity of the water at the point where we desire 
to take it has not been ascertained. Now, if we 
can get forty-five million gallons daily from 
Charles River by an expenditure of three mil- 
lion dollars, and if we can get only f t rty mil- 
lions daily from Sudbury River at an expense of 
five millions, and we know that Sudbury River 
is pure, and do not know that the water of 
Charles River is pure, it seems to me very proper 
— and the public wiU demand — to know whether 
the water of Charles River is pure or not. 1 think 
no member of this Council will be willing to vote 
upon this question until he understands it. No 
doubt the Water Board and Engineers have 
thoroughly investigated this subject, but the pub- 
lic are not satisfied. They do not regard the re- 
port of the Water Board as conclusive- Charles 
River appears, by the report, to be the most expe- 
dient, except in regare to the purity of the water. 
I say that point should be ascertained, and the 
public will wish to know why it should not be as- 
certained. The second order which I offered, and 
which the President has read, is an inquiry as to 
the damages which have been estimated 
either for Sudbury or Charles River. There 
has been no official estimate. I have heard 
that it has been stated by persons who 
have topographical and scientific knowledge, 
that the water damages of Sudbury River will not 
be less than thirteen million dollars. I do not be- 
lieve this; I think it is extravagant, but still it is 
rumor, and it should be explained. On the other 
hand, I am told that anengineer,who has sufficient 
scientific knowledge to enable him to judge cor- 
rectly, and who is familiar with the country, is 
willing to stake his reputation that the damages 
will not be more than a million and a half dollars. 
Now, if there is a competent engineer on whose 
opinion the public wiU rely, who makes this state- 
ment, I think it proper and expedient for the 
Water Board to obtain that engineer's judgment, 
and the facts on which he bases his opinion, and 
let them be shown to the iiublic. As it is now, the 
estimate of damages is entirely a matter of rumor. 
I think the public are not satisfied. It strikes me 
that I have just as much reason to depend on the 
knowledge and honesty of the gentleman who 
says it viill not cost less than thirteen millions, fas 
I have on the opinion of a gentleman who says the 
cost will not be more than a million and a half. 
Furthermore, I have l)een told that estunating 
water damages is easily obtained; it is easy to 
learn how much water hows through a river daily, 
and you know how much you are going' to use, and 
you know how much is drawn from the river by 
the mills. In that way an estimate can be made, 
although it be a rough one, and it could not be 
more rough than the estimates made of street 
damages. We all know how often the judgment 
of the most experienced persons will prove 
inaccurate. I have, therefore, suggested 
these orders tonight, because I understood 
there would be a meeting of the Water Com- 
mittee this week. I suggest them, not as impera- 
tive orders, but requesting them to conside the 
expediency of making these investigations. Per- 
haps they may be able to state why these matters 
have not been more fully explained. But one 
thing, I know, strikes the pubUc very forcibly. 
In tlie report of the Water Board, it is said tha 
citizens of Boston need not be afraid of these as- 
sessHients of damages, because they are to be as- 
sessed by a Massachusetts court and jury. Now, 
a Massachusetts court and jury have not always 
been prepossessed in favor of the city, and I 
hardly think Boston could hardly afford to employ 
a jury of twelve persons to purchase the mill 
rights on Sudbury River. In justice to the com- 
munity such an estimate should be thoroughly 
made. 

Mr. Dean of Ward 12 — I would suggest whether 
there will be any objection to framing the order 
so that the committee should procure the analysis. 
As the order is now, they are to consider and re- 
port upon the expediency of procuring the analy- 
sis. These orders have the same fault as those 
which I had the honor to offer at a previous meet- 
ing, having no provision for the appropriation to 
which the expense should be charged. 

Mr. Minot of Ward 17—1 am very glad to have 
the benefit of the gentleman's experience. I can 
only say that the reason I did not put that clause 
in as that the scheme he presented was so plausi- 
ble that I thought that, before voting to adopt an- 
other, his might be adopted. I will amend the 
order in accordance with his suggestion. 

Mr. Hunnewell of Ward 19—1 would ask if an 
analysis already obtained would be satisfactory. 
It is my impression that one has been made by 



FEBRUARY 12, 1874., 



62 



the town of Brooiline of the water of Charles 
Kiver, and I think it Is a matter of record. 

Mr. Minot — I will amend further by inserting 
the words "or otherwise." 

On motion of Mr. Dean of Ward 12, the nile was 
suspended and the order passed, as amended, in 
the f oUowing form : 

Ordered, That the Joint Standing Committee 
on Water ascertain by analysis or otherwise the 
purity of the water of Charles River at the most 
expedient point of taking the same for the use of 
the city of Boston ; the expense to be charged to 
the appropriation for Additional Water Supply. 

The order previously read by the Pre'ident was 
then amended by Mr. Minot, and passed, under a 
suspension of the rule, on motion of Mr. Dean of 
Ward 12, in the following form : 

Ordered, That the Joint Standing Committee on 
Water ascertain the number of mill=, the average 
amount of water required daily by each, on 
Charles and Sudbury rivers re-pectively, as a 
means of obtaining an approximate estimate of 
the damages which will be caused by making use 
of these rivers for a water supply; the expense to 
be charged to the appropriation for Additional 
Water Supply. 

EEVISION OF THE CITY CHARTER. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5 introduced the following : 
Resolved that the commissioners appointed to 
revise the city charter be requested to report to 
the City Council said revision in time to obtain 
action upon the same at the present session of the 
Legislature. 

Mr. Shaw— I think it is about three months since 
the commission was appointed. Within the last 
two or three weeks I have learned that no sub- 
stantial progress has been made. It is understood 
that the commission did meet and organize, and it 
seems to me now, from what I have heard directly 
from one of the commissioners, that it was not 
their intention to report in time to get any 
action by the present Legislature. I remember 
when the commissioners were appointed it was 
urged with a great deal of force that legifhition 
might be obtained during the present session. 
Now the Legislature has been in session some six 
weeks, and may be in session a few months longer, 
but unless these commissioners go to work to do 



\k 



something, there will not be time to secure the 
necessaiy legislation. We have an able commis- 
sion, and there is no sort of necessity for delay. 
They may as well go to work practically and have 
it done in a year, or at least a year and a half. I 
think the people look for some immediate action. 
I cannot conceive how it is possible to take so 
much time, simply to revise the city charter. 
These gentlemen have got all the facts, the laws 
and the ordinances, and ought to have a great deal 
of experience. I think there is an absolute neces- 
sity for revision, and I think the sooner we get a 
report the better. 
The resolve was passed. 

INDEFINITELY POSTPONED. 

On motion of Mr. West of Ward 16, the order to 
designate Ward 19 (Brighton) as the "Garden Dis- 
trict was taken from the table. 

The question was on giving the order a second 
reading. 

Mr. Hunnewell of Ward 19— Since this order was 
introduced by the disinterested kindness of the 
gentleman from Ward 16, 1 have been waited up- 
on by several gentlemen from Ward 19, who rep- 
resent that the name designated is not accepta- 
ble. Under such conditions, and having no other 
name to suggest, I move that the order be indef- 
initely postponed. 

Carried. 

QUALIFICATIONS OF ASSESSORS. 

Mr. Crowley of Ward 7 offered the following : 

Ordered, That the City Clerk be directed to 
withhold the certificate of election of First-Assist- 
ant-Assessors of E. B. Spinney and A. G. Wyman, 
until the opinion of the City Solicitor can be ob- 
tained in relation to their eligilbility to the above- 
named offices, as they now hold office in the Treas- 
ury Deparlment, and in violation of chapter 274, 
section 1, of the statutes of 1872. 

Mr. Minot of Ward 17—1 shall object to the pass- 
age of that order, unless the gentleman will intro- 
duce another referring the question to the Judi- 
ciary Committee. 

On motion of Mr. Crowley, of Ward 7 the order 
was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary of 
the Common Council. 

On motion of Mr.Wilbur of Ward 9, the Council 
adjourned. 



I 
t' 

I 



03 



B O A R 1 ) ( ) 1^ 



A L I> E R M E N 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

I< 1<:]?RITARY 1(), 1H74. 



The r(';i:ul:ir weekly iiiectiiifr of the Bo;ir(I <if Al- 
dermen was held at four o'clock P. M., Alderman 
<^lark. Chairman, presiding. 

EXKCUTIVE NOMINATIONS CONFIHMKD. 

Special Police Officers — Edward (Juigley, Chcst- 
riut-Hill Reservoir and its vicinity; Ebenezer 
Stone, CiUiM's Hiiildiut!; and its vicinity. 

I'KTITIONS REFERKKI). 

To the Coinmitter oil Povinf/. iViusic-Hall Asso- 
ciation and others, that the name of Central place 
be clianjied to that of Music Hall-place. 

(leorj^e H. Kuhn, trustee, to be paid for }::rade 
damages oil DuiUey street. 

Samuel Roach, to project lamps <at corner of 
Harvard and Washinffton streets. 

Directors of East Bo-ton Ferries, that the ave- 
nue leadiuR- from Maverick square to the South 
Ferry be reiiaveil with sipinre granite blocks, the 
avenue being imfit for public tr.avel. 

To tfie Committei' on Anuorirn. Company I), 
First Battalion Infantry, for approval of arinon- 
at Revere Hall, Bowdoin square. 

To the Cnmniittcf' on fuinpitil Noll. James B. 
Watkins ct a/., for u^se of Faneuil H.all for a levee 
of the (rood Samaritans. 

To tlir Co)ii)n iftrr on Co7nnion,etc., on flic part of 
tlif Jiorirl. .Joseph F. Paul, John Tisdale Bradlee, 
Charli s \V. Slack, Gtorge (). Caiiienter, Bal'lwin. 
Motume & Co., Potter, White & Bailey, A. & E. 
B it'dielder, and eighty others, for the removal of 
rue elms on Paddock's Mall; Ogden Codman and 
thirty-eight others, Edward Atkinson and sixty 
others, remoestrances against the removal of the 
elms on Paddock's Mall. 

To the Joint Vominittef on Common., etc. L. 
Foster Morse et al., that Orchard Park be eii- 
laiged. 

To the Com7n,ittee on, Sewers. .Tohn Parkinson, 
to be ])aid for damages caused by Stony-Brook im- 
provements. 

Isaac H. Cary, to be compenFateil for damages 
caused by the Stony Brook inqjrovements. 

To the' Committee on Connti/ Biiilrlinqs. Mem- 
bers of the Sutfolk-Couiity Bar, for hearing on the 
subject of a new Court House. 

To the Committee on Streets on the part of the 
lioanl. Martha and Caroline A. Sumner, for 
abatement of Cottage-street betterment asess- 
ment. 

To the Committee on Lieennes. Blanclnrd tt 
Ross, to open a variety theatre at 578 Wa' hinpion 
s:reft. 

Somerset Club, for renewal of license to keej) 
bowling alley. 

To the Committee on Police. Bernard O'Kane, 
patrolman, for amendment of the rules and regu- 
lations of the Police Department, so that officers 
doing duty in the day time shall be allowed the 
l)rivilege "of one day in the week, fortnight or 
month, as furlough, to transact ])rivate business; 
that no deiluction of pay on account of sickness 
shall be made for a period to be agreed upon here- 
after, and that officers shall have permission to 
attend religious worship on Sunday. 

To the Committee on Health on' the pm-t of the 
Jioard. P. McMarrow, to move and occupy a 
wooden stable for eight additional horses on 
South street. Ward 17. 

To the Committee on Claims. Nancy A. Stearns, 
to be compensated for jiersonal injuries sustained 
V)y a fall on Federal street. 

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

The annual report of the Superintendent of 
Streets (City Doc. No. 2!i) was submitted and sent 
down. An abstract is .appended: 

Pavlnr/. The sum of ifO.'il.OtO 01 was expended 
by the Paving Department during the municipal 
year 1873 for p.aving, repaving, gradiug, rejiairs of 
streets, removing and levelling snow, and for 
grade damages, etc., as f ollow,' : In city proper, 
i3i)],448 73; Koxbury, .'8;158,7!>8 50; South Boston, 
.f 129,05!) 88; East Boston, §70,990 44; Dorchester, 
.$116,304 00. 

Incidentals. .$41,052 95. 

Grade Damar/es. Citv proper, $5585 51; Rox- 
bury, .f.WOS; South Boston, $;«.50; East Boston, 
.«1210; Dorchester, S4750. Total, 5f22,758 51. 



The amount appropriated for paving, etc., for 
the present financial year, 187:!-4, was .SI ,000.000 ; 
total expenditures of the jtresent financial year to 
.January 1, 1874, $Hl2.:im 87. Balance of appropri- 
ation unexpended January 1, 1874, .§187,63.'{ 13. 
The amount of bills for edgestones, constructing 
sidewalks and sale of materials, lodged with the 
<'ity Treasurer during the year 1873 for collection, 
was $10,448 06. 

The amount paid into the city treasurv, during 
the same i)criod, and credited as having been paid 
in by the Paving Dcpartme)it on account of work 
done by said department, was .SCOBO 08. There 
have been i)aid, as authorized by the arbitration 
of referees, .¥84,4.53 83 for grade daiuages on Dev- 
onshire and Water streets and Spring lane. 

In a('dition to the supervision of operations of 
the Paving Department, the undersigned has been 
called upon, during the past year, to take charge 
of other work, the cost of which has been charged 
to the special ap])ropriations enumerated; South 
Market-street extension, .'818,123 71; Dudley, 
Stoughton, Pleasant and Commercial streets, 
widening and grading, $4917 bO; Fort Hill, 
.'ii!l,789 03; Suffolk-street District, .'i;(i835 49: Devon- 
shire-street extension. .1*7181 50; Warren-street 
widening, between Washington and Dudlev 
streets, .§12,809 15; Burnt District, .•S60,645 44. Ae- 
comi)anying the report is a schedule of the prop- 
erty belonging to the Paving Department. 

PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Petitions of the Inspector of Buildings, Richards 
& Co. et ((I., Silas Peirce et al. Referred in concur- 
rence. 

Order to place lands and buildings in annexed 
territory, not now in charge of other departments, 
in charge of Committee on Public Lands. Passed. 

Order for Committee on Ordinances to i)repare 
an ordinance for the removal of snow from roofs 
of buildings, as provided by chapter eighty-six of 
statu' es of 1863. Passed. 

Order for Committee on Water to ascertain, by 
analysis or otherwi'-e, the luirity of water in 
Charles River. Passed. 

Order for the Committee on Water to report on 
the number of mill privileges on Chailes and Sud- 
bury rivers, jind the vohnues of water in said 
rivers. Passed. 

Order to refer ^o much of the rejiort of the 
Water Registrar (City Doc. No. 134 of 1873) as re- 
lates to change of rates, to the Committee on 
Water. Passed. 

Order for flags to be displayed and a national 
salute to be fired at Km^t .and South Bo ton, the 
city i)roper, the Highland", Dorchester, West 
IJoxbury, Brighton and Charlestown, at noon, on 
the 23d inst., in commen\oration of the birthday 
of Oeorge Washington. P.assed— yeas 12, navs 0. 

Report of City Engineer. (City Doc. No. 20.) 
Placed on file. 

Order for Commission on Revision of the City 
Charter to report in season for action by the pre>- 
ent Legislature. 

Ableiman Cutter— I understand, from a conver- 
sation with one of the commissioners, that it will 
take them some six months to complete the revi- 
sion of the city charter. I do not think that it is 
commendable to crowd them, and I would like to 
hear some member of this Board explain the order 
or give a good reason for it. 

Alderman Stebbins — It is b.arely possible that 
the i)resent Legislature may be in session six 
months hence; and by passing the order the sub- 
ject may reach them. 

On motion of Alderman Cutter, the order was 
laid upon the taltle 

ELECTION OF FIRST-ASSISTANT-ASSESSOR. 

A certificate was received from the Common 
Council of the election of A. G. Wyman .as First- 
Assistant- Assessor in place of Richard J.Fennelly, 
chosen by the Board. On motion of Alderman 
Stebbins. the Board proceeded to an election, and 
the Chairman appointed Alderman Stebbins and 
Brooks a committee to collect and count votes. 
They reported as follows : 

Whole number of votes cast 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

A. G. Wviiian had 2 

R. J. Feimolly -i 

.lames Dennie r> 

There being no choice, a second ballot w.as taken, 
with the following result: 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

A. G. Wyman had 2 

R. J. Feimelly - 

James Dennie 8 



FEBRUARY 16, 18 74 



64 



And James Dennie was declared elected on the 
part of the Board. 

REPORTS FROM THE FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

The Chairman sulinitted re\;orts from the Joint 
•Committee on Finance, as follows: 

Report on the jietition of A. S. "Wheeler, trustee, 
to be compensated for two coupons of ( ityof Rox- 
bury stock which hnve been lost, recommending 
the passage of the following jrene;al order: 

Ordered, That the City Tiea'-urer be and he 
hereby is authorized to pay the amount of lost 
coupons of interest upon satiff jctory evidence of 
their loss being proiiuced by the party or parties 
claiming to own the same, and on the condition 
that the party or parties owning the same shall 
give a bond to the city, sati> factory to the City 
Solicitor and the City treasurer, to indemnify it 
Jfrom all legal claims in consequence of the pay- 
ment of said coupons. 

Passed. 

R IJort on the request of Committee on Streets, 
and an order for the l^orrowing of $!100,000, to be 
added to tha Devonshire-street Extension loan, 
recomniending that the order ought to pass, as the 
money will be required to settle outstanding 
claims against the city on account of this under- 
taking. 

The report was accepted and the order was read 
once and laid over. 

Report on recjuest of Committee on Bridges for 
an additional apiivoiuiat^on of JJ.'iOOO, recommend- 
ing the passage of the accompanying order: 

Ordered, Tliat the Auditor of Accounts be and 
he hereby is authoiized to tranffer from the Re- 
served Fund to the appropriation for Bridges the 
sum of five tliousand dollars 

Passed — Yeas 12, nays 0. 

THE PROPOSED NEW BRIDGE BETWEEN BOSTON 
AND CAMBRIDGE. 

The Chairman submitted a report from the Joint 
Committee on Streets, on the petition of W. H. 
Jackson ei aL, that the City Government support 
the apiilication i;ow before ihe Legilalure for au- 
thority to construct a n; w avenue between l>o=ton 
and Cambridge, recommending the passage of the 
accompanyii g order: — 

Ordered, That the Committee on Legislative 
Matters be and they are hereby directed to favor 
the passnge of nn act by the Legii-lature author- 
izing the constiuction of a new avenue between 
Boston and Cambridge, in such locafon and upon 
such terms and conditions as the sni I coiumittee 
may deem best for the interests of this city. 

Passed. 

THE WIDENING OF ATLANTIC AVENUE. 

The Chairman presented a report from the Joint 
Committee on Streets, on the petition- of the Old 
Colony Railroad and Jo-hua C. Stone et aL, that 
the city petition the Legililure for antiioiityto 
make equitable charges "for ihe use of Atlantic 
avenue, for railroad and marktt purposes in case 
it shoul I be widened, lecommenuing the passage 
of the accomi^anying order : 

Ordered, Thrt his Honor the Mayor be requested 
to petition the Legislature now in session for the 
passage of an act authorizing the city of Boston 
to make equital le charges for the u- e and occu- 
pation of Atlantic aveuue for railroad and market 
purposes, in case the City Government should 
hereafter deem it expedient" to widen said avenue. 

The (juestion was on giviug the order a second 
rea ling 

Alderman Stebbins — I hope the order will lie 
over. 

Al lerman Worthington — It is desirable that the 
subject shoul 1 be brought before the present ses- 
sion of the Legi-lature, and it is necessary that 
the order should pass without delay. If there is 
any good reason for its lying over I am peifectly 
willing. 

Al lerman Stebbins — If carried out as the pro- 
jectors intend it shall be, this order involve-; an 
expend e of $750,000 in widening Atlintic avenue, 
the burden of which will be borne by the tax- 
payers of Bo5ton for the benefit of one or two cor- 
poratiou=. I think we are hardly prepared to take 
this step for the benefit of iniividuals, for it is 
more in the nature of a private enterprise than 
th3 public know. 

• Al lerman Worthington— I think the Alderman 
coull hardly have unaerstood the order. As I un- 
derstand it, several gentlemen have petitioned the 
city for the right to stand wagons in the street 
under certain circumstances, which are these: 
Certain merchants and others are talking about 
the widening of the street; the Old Colony Rail- 



way Company wish the street widened and desire 
to pay for the use of it. The Street Commissioners 
say they can do nothing wichout first having leg- 
islative authority. If we can have authority to 
negotiate with the Old Colony Railway, and they 
will pay the interest on the c6. t of the widening, 
then the matter may be duly considered and acted 
upon. If that company shall not be willing to do 
so, then 1 do not believe tlie committee would ask 
thai ihe authority be given. Nothing will be done 
until the railroad companies come up and say they 
need the land very much and are willing to pay 
the iatcrsst on tlie money. If we get the author- 
ity, and the railroad companies say they will pay 
the interest on $750,000, then the city of Boston 
will consider the subject. Until the authority is 
obtained not one of the committee is in favor of 
action. I hope we shall get the privilege of nego- 
tiatiiig with %\\q railroads for this thing. 

Alderman Stebbins— T he plausibility of the 
statement thus made equals that of the projector 
of tliis enterprise. As i understand the case it is 
this : About two or three years ago a party who 
owns a large amount of land on Atlantic avenue 
petitioned chat that avenue might be widened one 
hundred feet. The Street Comnussioners reported 
that the cost would be $750,000, and the widening 
was defeated. Now it has assumed another shape. 
The projector of that enterprise has obtained pe- 
titions signed by marketmen in Watertovvn and 
other places, asking that the city of Boston obtain 
authority to charge equitable rates for the use of 
the place by market wagons, which means that 
Atlantic avenue shall be wideneil, and the land of 
the j)rojector be taken for his own personal bene- 
fit. I talk very plainly, because I think the sub- 
ject demands it. I flunk it is one of the largest 
private schemes for the benefit of private parties 
that has been before the City Council for several 
years, and, as such, I feel bound to oppose it. 

Aide, man Brooks— As this is a very important 
subject, I hope it will lie over one Aveek at least. 
There is a great deal of truth in the gentleman's 
statement, i think, and I doubt very much whether 
the expenditure of so much money for this \)\\x- 
pose is advisable. 

Alderman Worthington — That is not the ques- 
tion we are considering. We are merely asking 
the Legislature for power to make equitable 
charges for the use of a certain street in Boston. 
If we get that authority nothing may be done. 
Not one of the committee is in favor of widening 
Atlantic avenue unless the Old Colony Railroad 
Company and the marketmen are ready to come 
forward and pay the interest on the cost of the 
increased width of the street. If it were merely 
a question of widening that street for commercial 
purposes, 1 think it would be a very important 
question for us to consider the cost. And it is one 
of the most important questions that will come 
before this Board. We should make use of all 
the commercial advantages tliat Boston po-sesses 
for the transportaiion and delivery of merchan- 
dise, and if we can get any assistance from the 
railroads 1 am in favor of it. 

Alderman Cutter in the chair. 

Alderman Clark — As this report comes from the 
committee of which I am chairman, perhaps an 
explanation from me is appropriate at the present 
time. This petition comes from three different 
railroad cor^-orations and a veiy large number of 
marke'men. It may be tiiat the marketmen live 
in Watertown, anu elsewhere, but tliey all do 
business in Quincy and Faneuil Hall inarkets. 
They ask the city to obtain from the State the 
right to charge for the use of Atlantic avenue, for 
market and railroad purposes, in case tlxe city, 
ei. her this year, next year, or ten years hence, 
shoul 1 see ht to widen Atlantic avenue from Com- 
mercial street to Rowe's wharf. It does not con- 
tempi ite the expenditure of a single dollar, un- 
less it may be required by the Committee on Leg- 
islative Matters to get this authority from the 
Leglslaaire, and I do not think they are in the 
habit of spending large sums for such purposes. 
The question of widening Atlantic avenue was not 
entertained for a single moment by the Committee 
on Streets. It is merely asking the State for the 
right to make charges for the use of Atlantic 
avenue, if, in the future, the city sliould see fit to 
widen ir. It has been thought that the widening 
of Atlantic avenue would be a capital thing for 
the mercantile community. I do not think that 
the party who owns this land is particularly anx- 
ious about it, or particularly interested in it. I 
believe lie has more extended ideas and views of 
public improvements ; that his interests are not en- 
tirely Sfclfish.and that he takes a great interest in the 



65 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



growth and prosperity of the city. I bcliove that 
at some time or other it may be a good, judicious 
thing to widen Atl;intic avenue, to accommodate 
not only the marketmen, but to enable the rail- 
roads to have better facilities for doing their busi- 
ness. All that this order calls for is to ask for the 
right to assess upon the railroads equitable 
charges for the use of this street, should the city 
see lit at some future time to widen it. The city 
has not the right now to assess upon any railroad 
or individual a charge for the use of Atlantic ave- 
nue or any other street. Complaint has been 
made that cars are allowed to stand on Commer- 
cial and Federal streets ; they have no right to 
stand there more than fifteen or twenty minutes. 
But the idea advanced by the Alderman from 
"V^ard 8, that this contemplates the widening of 
Atlantic avenue at the present time is erroneous. 
It does not contemplate the expenditure of a sin- 
gle dollar. I contend that it will be getting rights 
which the city is entitled to and ouyht to have. 
There is no danger of the city obtaining more 
rights than it is entitled to. I believe this matter 
is one of very great interest to the city of Boston 
— much more than to any single individual. If the 
city should find that it is for its interest to widen 
Atlantic avenue, and it shall have the right to 
assess charges so that it can obtain an interest of 
six or eight per cent, on the investment, it certain- 
ly would be a gootl thing. I hope the order will 
take its second reading and pass today. 

Alderman Stebbins— To make the order of any 
practical value whatever, Atlantic avenue must 
be widened. After this authority is obtained from 
the Legislature, the next thing will be a pressure 
to widen Atlantic avenue a hundred feet. The 
Street Commissioners have already reported on 
that. Then there is the petition to use the avenue 
for market purposes. Last year the city leased 
certain lands at large expense on India street for 
market wagons, and there is room enough there 
for all the market wagons that come into the city. 
There is no demand from the marketmen for ad- 
ditional market facilities. I repeat what I said 
before, that I look upon this as a scheme for the 
benefit of private individuals at the expense of 
the taxpayers. 

Alderman Clark— I do not know whether the 
marketmen demand it or not, but I believe that 
the business interests of the city would be very 
greatly benefited if Atlantic avenue could be wid- 
ened another hundred feet at the expense of the 
railroad corporations. There is no (question but 
that we need all the room we can get to act ommo- 
date the Inisiness growth of the city. I do not 
know whether it is needed for market purposes, 
but I do know that the shipping interests of the 
city are rapidly increasing and demand that all 
the facilities that can be obtained shall be given 
to the merchants. I admit that it is the firsu step 
toward the widening of Atlantic avenue. If the 
railroad companies say they will pay ten per ceiit. 
interest on the expense of widening tliTt street,we 
now have no right to take it. It will tio no I-iarm 
to obtain the authority, and in my judgment it 
will be best for the city to widen that street. 

Alderman Stebbins— I will go still further, and 
say that to locate three or four railroad tracks on 
that street would be a great detriment to proper- 
ty ; the large estates on Atlantic avenue would be 
decreased in value very much. I am no lawyer, 
but I doubt very much whether the Legislature 
will pass a law to allow the city to charge anybody 
for occupying a part of a public street. 

Alderman Prescott — 1 desire to correct the gen- 
tleman from Ward 8 in one particular. He states 
that the city last year leased lands at a large ex- 
pense on India street. That large rent was one 
cent for two years. 

Ahlermau Stebbins— The lands had to be filled 
up. 

Alderman Prescott— The gentleman reminds me 
of the expense of filling up the lands. That 
will be more than compensated for by the owners 
paying the taxes on the increased valuation when 
the lease expires. 

Alderman Stebbins — I would inquire of the 
Committee on Marl^ets if there is not plenty of 
room there for all the market wagons which will 
come. 

Alderman Prescott — The room there is all occu- 
pied now. 

Alderman Emery— "Would it be detrimental to 
the order to have it lie over a week ? 

Alderman Clark — I think that after this week no 
new petitions will be received by the Legislature ; 
though I suppose the Alderman from Ward 8 can 
explain that better than I can, as he is one of the 



Committee on Legislative Matters. 1 have no ob" 
jection to its lying over if that will not throw it 
out at the State House. 

Alderman Wort hington— The information given 
to the (toinmittee was that the 20tii was the last 
day on which it couM go in. That is the reason I 
am in favor of pressing the order today. 

Alderman Clark — I am informed that the time 
expires on Saturday. 

The order was refused a second reading— 5 for 
and 6 against — and was laid over. 

MISCELLANEOUS KEPOUTS AND OKDEllS SUBMIT- 
TED. 

By Alderman Bigelow, from the Committee on 
Licenses — reports in favor of granting the appli- 
cations of Mark Salom, 365 Washington street, for 
renewal of auctioneer's license; Ldward Liiine- 
man, 15 Eliot street, for renewal of billiard li- 
cense ; Charles H. Peaiborn, to give exhibitions of 
ventriloquism from Feb. 2:3 to March 9; J. Pigeon, 
to exhibit "Punch and Judy" at 130 Cambridge 
streetj E. W. Todd, agent, to exhibit a panorama 
at Union Hall, Chailostown; James Fitzgerald, 
to deal in second-hand clothes at 146 Kingston 
Street; Benjamin Locke, et al., for transfer of 
wagon licdises; George F. Bonney & Co., for 
transfer of hack license ; John Slattery, A. B. Da- 
vis and George R. m-esly, for hack license ; Timo- 
thy Griffin and twelve others, for minors' licenses ; 
George W. Nickerson, and Bartholomew Sv/an, 
for victualler's license ; and "leave to withdraw" 
on applicatioii of Dennis Murphy, for victualler's 
license at Too Washington street; Asa Swett, for 
iuiiholder's license at 10 Harvard street. 

Severally accepted. 

By Aliierman Kmery, from the Committee on 
Public Lands — Report on petition of trustees of 
Boston College, recommending the passage of the 
accompanying order: 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be and he 
hereby is authorized to execute an instrument 
drawn sati^f actory to the City Solicitor, changing 
the condition set forth in a deed given by the city 
of Boston to John McKlroy, and recorded ^\^th 
Suffolk Deeds, lib. 781, folio 170, which reads that 
no building shall be placed nearer to James street 
than ten feet, so as to lead that no building shall 
be placed nearer to James street than seven feet 
therefrom as shown upon the accompanying 
plan, to be recorded with such instrument — upon 
condition that said McLlroy, his heirs or assigns, 
shall pay all equitable damages occasioned by 
such change of condition. 

The question was on giving the order a second 
reading. 

Alderman Harris — I hope the order wiU be ex- 
plained. 

Alderman Emery — The object is more clearly set 
forth in the report and order than I could state it. 
However, I think I can make the gentleman under- 
stand it. This is a report on the petition of the 
Tru'itees of Boston College for a release of certain 
restrictions upon a piece of land purchased of the 
city of Boston. It is a lot lying between Harrison 
avenue and St. James street, or rather between 
Concord street and Newton street. They ask for a 
release of the conditions on three feet of land on 
the street. I believe there can be no serious objec- 
tions. The building will then set back seven feet, 
instead of ten as now, which will leave more laud 
on the rear towards Newton street than what the 
restrictions call for. 

Alderman Hall— This is a lot that was purchased 
of the city by the college at fifty cents a foot with 
certain restrictions, which were a part and parcel 
of the purchase, (ieutlemen have purchased land 
on Newton street, the deeds for which refer to 
those restrictions. I do not think the city of Bos- 
ton can release those restrictions without being 
liable. 

Alderman Emery— The order provides that they 
are to hold the city harmless from aU damages. 

Alderman Clark — I wisli tlie order might lie over. 
It is a subject I do not under^tand. Complaint 
has been made in West Newton street about the 
building cutting off the air and light. If that is 
so, I should like to have the order lie over a week 
in order to have time to look into it. 

Alderman Emery— I have not the slightest ob- 
jection to its lying over. The committee gave no- 
tice to the petitioners and they appeared. There 
were some remonstrants who' were notified, but 
they were not present. 1 he thing asked for by 
the petitioners was so slight that nobody could 
object to it. I believe that the remonstrants 
learned that they were mistaken in regard to the 
petition, and for that reason did not appear to ob- 
ject. 



FKBRUAR.Y 16, 187 4t. 



66 



On motion of Alderman Harris, the order was 
laid upon the table. 

By Alderman Emery— Report (leave to withdraw) 
on remonstrance of Job A. Turner, against peti- 
tion of Trustees of Boston College. Accepted. 

By Alderman Power — Report from the Printing 
Committee upon the order for printing five hun- 
dred copies of the report on additional supply 
of water (City Doc. No. 29 of 187.3). The com- 
mittee have ascertained that, to meet the require- 
ments of the members of the Common Council for 
Information upon the important subjects em- 
braced in the report, a sufficient number of copies 
can be made available f lom the edition already 
printed, to supply each member of tlie Council 
with a copy, within a week from the present time, 
■which he can permaner.tly retain ; and the Super- 
intendent of Printing has taken measures to ac- 
complish this result. To print a new edition 
would require tliree weeks, and the cost of the 
first copy would be about .^5400, each additional 
copy costing about fifty cents. The edition al- 
ready printed was one thousand copies, and 
cost $!1377 77. Tlie usual document edition, last 
year, was four hundred and fifty copies ; and more 
than double the usual editicni of this document 
has been supplied, th;^ number having been oiig- 
iually determined as being sufficient for all re- 
quired pur])oses ; and the large map was released 
and erased from the lithographic stones. As the 
requirements of the City Government will be fully 
and promptly supplied, "and as a large edition has 
been supplied for i)ublic information, and espe- 
cially the bound volumes of the City Documents 
(containing tlie report No. 29) will be placed in all 
the departinents of the city, and In tlie Public 
liibrary, probably as soon as a reprint coull be ac- 
corrplished, the committee are oi the opirion that 
the order for reprinting the report ought not to 
pass. The report was accepted 

By Alderman Power, from the Committee on 
Sewers — 

Ordered, That the sum of .Si396 59 be hereby re- 
funded to Charles Robinson, attorney, being one- 
half the assessments and costs levied upon certain 
estates in Bartlett street, Charlestown, for a 
sewer. 

Alderman Stebbins— I would like to have an ex- 
planation of this order. 

Alderman Power— This is a matter which be- 
longed to the city of Charlestown and was all set- 
tled there, as they supposed, but our Auditor wiU 
not pay the bill until the passage of that order 
here. He has no doubts about its being correct; 
still he wishes the passage of that ortler for the 
payment of the money. 

The order was passed. 

By Alderman Power — 
. Ordered, That the Committee on Ordinances 
consider the expediency of so amending the eighth 
section of the ordinance relating to the Law De- 
partment as either to dispense with the semi-an- 
nual reports of the City Solicitor or to make one 
annual report answer the purpose of said section. 

Passed. 

By Alderman "Worthington, from the Committee 
on Armories — 

Ordered, That there be allowed and paid to Cap- 
tain James J. Flyiin, commanding Company I, 
, Ninth Regiment of Infantry, M. V. M., the sum of 
eighty-nine dollars and forcy cents, to reimburse 
him for taxes paid in 1873 on the armory of said 
company at No. 544 Washington street;; said sum 
to be charged to the appropriation for Armories. 

Passed— yeas 11, nays 0. 

Ordered, That there be allowed and paid to 
Henry C. Richards the sum of twentj'-flve dollars, 
on account of rent for the armory occupied by 
Company F, First Regiment of Infantry, M. V. 
M., at the corner of Warren and Palmer streets, 
previous to the first day of October, 1873 ; said 
sum to be charged to the appropriation for Armo- 
ries. 

Passed— yeas 11, nays 0. 

By Allerman Worthington, from the Committee 
on Health— Reports in favor of granting the peti- 
tions of C. J. Donovan & Co. and A. B. Kenny, for 
leave to occupy wooden stables. Severally, ac- 
cepted. 

By Alderman Power, from the Committee on 
Bridges- 
Ordered, That until otherwise ordered, Ihe sev- 
eral superintendents and draw-tenders of bridges 
in Charlestown and Brighton be allowed the same 
compensation which they received from the city 
of Charlestown and the town of Brighton previous 
to the first Monday in January last. 

Passed. 



By Alderman Power, from the Committee on 
Paving — 

Ordered, That the Board establish the grade of 
Athens street, between F and Dorchester streets, 
as shown on a plan and profile drawn by the City 
Surveyor, dated March 22, 1872, and deposited in 
the office of said City Surveyor. 

Read once. 

By Alderman Peters — 

Whereas, The town of West Roxbury, in town 
meeting held March 3, 1873, voted that one-half 
the fees received for dog licenses be paid to the 
West Roxbuiy Free Library, it is hereby 

Ordered. That the Treasurer pay to said West 
Roxbury Fiee Library one-half the dog-license 
fees he has received on account of the late town 
of West Roxbuiy, amounting to f 482 50. 

Al lennan Harris in quired what appropriation 
the money was to be charged to. 

Alderman Peters— The town of West Roxbury, 
at its last annual March meeting, voted that one- 
half the sum received from dog licenses in that 
town ^hould be jiaid by tiie Treasurer to the AVest 
Roxbury Free Libravy. The money has been paid 
into the treasury of Boston, and I suppose the sum 
named in the order will be charged to the fund re- 
ceived from West Roxbury. 

The order was passed. 

By Aid ninan Stebbins — 

Ordered That the income derived by the sale of 
lots, etc., in the Evergreen Cemetery, Ward 19, 
be set apart by the Auditor of Accounts to defray 
the expenses incurred in maintaining said cem- 
etery. 

Passed. 

By Alderman Prescott — 

Ordered, That His Honor the Mayor be requested 
to petition the Legislature now m session for an 
amendment to the law relating to the sealing of 
weights and measures, so as to provide for the 
appointment of deputy sealers in place of assist- 
ants, and for such other changes as may be found 
necessary to increase the efficiency of the law. 

Passed 

KEQUEST FOR ADDITIONAL APPKOPRIATION. 

Alderman Harris presented the following (City 
Document No. 23): 

The Commitf e on Streets respectfully report 
that an additional loan of $260,000 will be required 
to complete the extension of Washington street to 
Haymarket squaie, to pay the land and building 
damages yet unsettled, the grade damages, and 
for gradi-.ig and paving the street. The loan au- 
thorized when the order jjassed, in November, 
1872, to extend the street, was $;i,500,000. The land 
and building damages paid from it to date amount 
to $1,429,601 63, leaving unexpended $70,338 37. 
Claims yet unsettled for land and building dam- 
ages are estimated to amount to about $112,900; 
the grade damages, $75,000; grading and 'paving 
the street, .'ii;80,000; and the co^t of negotiating the 
total loans requested ($1,760,000), and chargeable 
to tho-e loans, $61,730,— in all $329,630; an excess 
of $259,291 63 over the balance of the original loan 
now remaiiiing. The committee would therefore 
recommend the passage of the accompanying or- 
der for an additional loan of $260,000 : 

Ordered, That the Treasurer be and he hereby is 
authorized to 1 orrow, under the direction (,f the 
Committee on Finance, the sum of two hundred 
and sixty thousand dollars, to be added to the loan 
for the extension of Washington street to Hay- 
market square. 

Referred to the Committee on Finance. 

PETITION FOR A NEW STREET. 

Alderman Stebbins— I wish to present a ])etition 
signed by seventy or more persons living in the 
vicinity of Medford court and Briggs place, ask- 
ing that a new street may be laid out, by extend- 
ing Briggs place through to Washington streets 
The petition represents "that the cost of this pub- 
lic impro> ement would be trifling compared with 
the benefit derived. The value of the land is but 
$1 50 per foot one-half the distance, and $7 per 
foot for the other half, and only one building'will 
have to be removed. This will give a new street, 
increase the taxable propertv, and remove an in- 
tolerable nuisance." The petition is signed by 
Samuel M. Colcord and many others. I think it is 
signed by all the physicians at the South End. 

On motion of Alderman Stebbins, the petition 
was referred to the Street Commissioners. 

MOUNTED POLICE. 

By Alderman Clark, from the Committee on Po- 
lice—Report on so much of the Mayor's inaugural 
audress as relates to the organization of a mount- 



67 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



ed patrol for police service in this city, and trans- 
mitting a (^oiniuunication from the Cliicf-of- Police 
covciiiif;- estimates of the expense of organizing 
and maintaining such a force. The committee 
are i)rei)ai"e(l to rec(nnmend the organization of a 
mounted force consisting of two men in each of 
the fourteen police districts, and the necessary 
orders to (-arry out the recommendation will be 
presented as soon as the appropriations for the 
next financial year are made. 

Tile Cliicf-of-l'olice in his communication says 
"Tlie average distance of beats on the several 
police divisions in tlie city over which patrol offi- 
cers Willie on duty are required to pass is as fol- 
lows : 

Divisions Nos. 1, 2, 3, f and 8, average distance 
about one mile. 

Divisions Nos. 5 and 6, average distance about 
two miles. 

Divisions Nos. 9 and 10, average distance about 
three mUes. 

Division No. 7, average distance about four 
miles. 

Division No. 15, average distance about six 
miles. 

Division No. 14, average distance about nine 
miles. 

Division No. 11, average distance about ten 
miles. 

Division No. 13, average distance aliout twelve 
miles. 

The patrolman is required to "continually patrol 
every part of his beat as often as once each hour, 
if practicable." It is (piite apparent that all the 
beats on Nos. 7, 11, 13, 14 and 15 cannot be visited 
"in every part" every hour, as leLjuired, by the 
officers patrolling them; and on some beats if he 
does so once in seven hours he will have done a 
good duty. Neither can the sergeant, even if 
mounted, perform but a small part of the duty 
assigned him on Divisions Nos. 11, 13 and 14; nor 
is it perhaps necessary that he should <lo so on 
some of the sparsely settled territory ; yet it would 
seem that belter police protection should be 
afforded to the inhabitants residing on such 
territory than can now possibly be given by • 
officers on foot, and in the more compact part of 
the city, if an officer having charge of a division 
can visit every part of his district and meet his 
men four times while mountetl, when he coulil but 
twice, if on foot, tliat fact would seem worthy of 
consideration. To learn, as far as practicable, at 
what particular time during the twenty-four hours 
of the day the largest amount of crime is commit- 
ted, and also at what time fires most commonly 
occur, the recoi'ds for the year 1873 have been ex- 
amined with the following result : 

Whole numb;'r of arrests dui'iug the year 27,845 

Arrests niacly between 8 A. M. and 6 f. M., ten 

hours, about liO-UO of all. 
Arrests made between B P. M. and 1 A. M., seven 

hours, about (i:i-14U of all. 
Arrests made l)-tvveen 1 P. M. and 8 A. M., seven 

hours, about 17-140 of all. 

Wliole number of fires during the year 620 

Fires between 8 A. JM. and 6 P. M., about 53-140 of 

all. 
Fires between 6 P. M. and 1 A. M., about 65-140 of 

all. 
Fires between 1 A. M. and 8 A. M., about 22-140 of 

all. 

Thus showing that nine-twentieths of all arrests 
made during the year were between the hours of 
6 P. M. and 1 A. M., and nearly one-half of all the 
fires occurred during the same time. In offences 
committed against persons alone, there is an in- 
crease over the estimate for the evening period of 
about fourteen per cent., and it will be remem- 
bered that nearly all the aggravated crimes com- 
mitiod in the outer portions of our city have been 
peri)etrated between 6 P.M. and I'A. M. The 
Chief-of-Folice, in the report, gives considerable 
attention to the selection, care and keeping of 
horses for the department, the cost of which with 
all necessary equipments is estimated to be about 
$350, and an estimated cost per annum of keeping 
each horse, with the repair of equipments, inter- 
est, etc., is estimated at .■j475. The yearly expense of 
a mounted man and horse will not exceed $1600. 
In European cities where the experiment has been 
tried it has never been abandoned, and a mounted 
force is considered as essential as an ordinary 
patrol. 

The report was accepted. 

TERMINUS OF EASTERN RAILROAD IN EAST BOS- 
TON. 

Alderman Brooks submitted the following : 
Ordered, That His Honor the Mayor be request- 
ed to petition the General Court, now in session. 



for the i)assage of an act changing the location of 
the Eastern Railroad in East Boston, so as to pre- 
vent the cros.-ing at grade of Marion street, Pres- 
cott street, Porter street, Maverick street, Sumner 
street, and Webster street, by the tracks of said 
corporation. 

Alderman Stebbins — I desire to know what is 
contemplated by that order. 

Alderman lirooks — It is in contemplation to 
change the railroad track from its present location 
to a line inside the S"a wall which it is proposed to 
have built. That will carry the railroad outside of 
all those streets which at the present time cross 
the track. 

Alilerman Stebbins — At whose expense is this 
change to take place? If it is to be done at the 
city's expen-e 1 shall vote against the order. If 
it is in contemplation for tlie Eastern Railroad to 
submit quietly and l»ear all the expense, I shall 
vote for it. 

The Chair— The order does not designate who 
shall bear the expense. 

On motion of Alderman Worthington, the order 
was laid upon the table. 

SPECI.\L SESSION. 

Alderman Stebbins — I have no desire to inter- 
pose ol)jections to an order whicli may seem im- 
l)ortant to several members of the Board. I 
therefore move that when this Board adjourn it 
be to Tliarsday next at one o'clock P. M., when 
the order can be acted upon and go to the Com- 
mon Council that night. Tiiere are other impor- 
tant reports which can be acted upon at the same 
time. 

The motion prevailed. 

SALARIES OF CITY OFFICERS. 

By Alderman Stebbins, from the Joint Commit- 
tee on Salaries- -Report and o-rders (printed City 
Doc. No. 26) estatdishing the salaries of city offi- 
cers for the year beginning on 1st of April next. 
The increase recommended in the salaries and 
allowances for clerk hire, as at present established, 
are as follows: 

Clerk hire in Treasurer's office, including fur- 
nishing transportation for the Paymaster, $5200. 

Clerk hire in office of Auditor of Accounts, 
$1500. 

Clerk hire in office of City Clerk, .<S2840. 

Assistance in office of Clerk of Committees, $50. 

First and second assistants in Ci.y Solicitor's 
office, $500 each. 

Additional assistant in the Messenger's office, 
$400." 

Clerk of the Board of Street Commissioners, 
$200. 

Superintendent of Common and Public Grounds, 
$200. 

Master of House of Correction, $500. 

Chairman of Board of Assessors, $,500. 

The total amount of increase recommended is, 
®n salaries, $2850; on clerk hire, $9540. 

In view of the changes whicli may soon be made 
in the organization of the C'cy Government, the 
committee have felt it to be their duty to refrain 
from making any additions to the salaries as at 
present established, except in those cases where it 
was clearly necessary on account of the increased 
business of the departments, growing out of the 
additions to the territory and population of the 
city. Tlie committee have not sufficient informa- 
tion at this time in regard to the duties perform- 
ed by the draw tenders on the Chailestown and 
Brighton bridges, to enable them to fix the amount 
of compensation which should be allowed; and 
orders covering the salaries of those officers wiU 
be presented hereafter. 

The report and orders were laid over. 

PROPOSED CHANGE IN THE WATER BOARDS. 

On motion of Alderman Stebbins, the order for 
Committee on Water to consider the expediency 
of a union of the Cochituate and Mystic water 
boards under one board of management, to be ap- 
pointed by the Mayor, and to be paid for their ser- 
vices, was taken from the table. Tlie question was 
on the passage of the order. 

Alderman Broolvs^ — I would like to know fram 
the geiitleman what this order contemplates. 

Alderman Stebbins— It is for the Committee on 
Water to consider the expediency of uniting the 
Mystic and Cochituate water boards in one. 
Whatever the committee may conclude upon will 
be reported back to the City 'Council. It is very 
rarely that objection is made to orders of inqmry. 

The order was passed. 

THE PARK QUESTION. 

On motion of Alderman Emery, Alderman 
Power's motion to reconsider the rejection of the 



FEBRUARY 16, 1874r 



68 



report and order of the Special Committee on 
Mayor's Address, including a reference of so much 
as relates to iiublic parlis to a special commission, 
to consist of two Aldermen three Councilmen, 
three citizens at large, and the Mayor, — said com- 
mission on the part of the City Council to be elect- 
ed by concurrent ballot, and those at large to be 
appointed by the Mayor,— was taken from the 
table. 
The question was on reconsideration. 
Alderman Emery — If I understand this question 
correctly, a motion was made by the gentleman on 
my right — the Alderman from Ward 12 — to recon- 
sider the motion rejecting a motion to concur with 
the Common Council in the passage of the order 
providing for the appointment of a commission to 
consider the expediency of establishing one or 
more ijublic parks and report to the City Council 
thereon. The motion of the Alderman from "tVard 
12, to reconsider that vole, was laid upon the table 
on my motion, and the question now is a recon- 
sideration of the vote rejecting the motion to con- 
cur with the Common Council. I hope the motion 
to reconsider will prevail. I see no reason why we 
should throw aside this matter entirely, when we 
ask for so little. All we ask is a commission to 
consider the expediency of establishing a park, 
and for them to report to tliis Council. We are 
committed to nothing by passing this order. 

Alderman Power — I hope tlie motion to recon- 
sider will not prevail, for the reasons that were 
given at the time — that the proper committee to 
consider this subject is the Committee on Com- 
mon and Squares. There is no msne necessity — 
not half the necessity— for having a special com- 
mittee to examine tliis question than there is the 
subject of water. If this subject goes to the Com- 
mittee on Common I have no doubt they will give 
prompt consideration, and we shall have a report 
much more speedily than if we appoint a commis- 
sion outside of tiiis Government. For that reason 
I hope the reconsideiation v/dl not prevail. 

Alderman Wortliington — The very reason that 
the gentleman mentions is an argument why 
we should refer it to a special committee, and 
therefore I am in favor of this reconsideration.. 
If the gentleman will look back at the history of 
the water question he will tind that it has several 
times been referred to special committees. In 
1827 it was referred to R. H. Eddy ; in 1835 the sub- 
ject was talked about again, and then Daniel 
Treadwell, Loammi Baldwin, E. C. Lowell, James 
F. Baldwin and Nathan Hale were selected as a 
special committee, and they reported in 1838 to the 
City Government on the subject of water. Again 
in every ward they had their unions, who came to 
the City Government and demanded water, and 
again it was referred to Nathan Hale, James P. 
Baldwin and Thomas B. Curtis. They went for- 
ward, made arrangements, did all the work and in- 
troduced the water into the city, and the CJity 
Council aided those commissioners by raising the 
money. Again, when Chestnut Hill Reser- 
voir was built, you will find that even the 
subject of buying the land was referred to a com- 
mission outside of the City Government— to Otis 
Norcross and four others. I forget their names 
now, but it is very easy to find them in the report. 
They were appointed commissioners to purchase 
the land if they thought desirable, and report to 
the City (lovernment. They did so, and reported 
to the city. I believe there is no single case in re- 
gard to water works that we have not had com- 
missioneis appointed, just as we ask now, and as 
the Mayor has proposed. They have invariably 
reported upon the expediency of the project, just 
as we ask to have this commission report. In 1845 
connnissioners were appointed to go forward and 
build the water works. I think that every exam- 
ple we have had in our experience in obtaining 
water is a reason for a commission to examine the 
subject of parks in the city of Boston. 

Alderman Power— The gentleman goes back to 
the time when we had no water woi^s, no water 
board, no committee on water to refer the matter 
to. It was a new thing entirely. Now, we have 
a Committee on Common and Squares supposed 
to be more familiar with this subject than any 
commission which can be selected outside of the 
City Government. The Mayor has not recom- 
mended any outside commission to look after this 
matter; he merely calls our attention to it. I 
think the Committee on Common will give the 
prompt attention to the subject that it demands, 
and it will receive such action that will be fully 
satisfactory to all the gentlemen who are in favor 
of parks. There is no one on that committee who 
is in favor of blocking the matter. They will look 



over the ground carefully, and report to this 
Board. I do not know hovv' the majority will re- 
port, but I know that no one on that committee 
who IS opposed to parks has any desire to thwart 
the desires of tliose who wish to have parks. 

Alderman Worthington — Do I understand the 
gentleman to say there was no water committee 
in 1844, or water board in 1854? I think if he 
will cast his memory back he will find that the 
Committee on Water considered the subject. Cer- 
tainly there was sucli a committee in 1845 and in 
1854. I think we should have some advice and con- 
suUatiou with gentleman outside of this Board. I 
certainly have no objection to the Committee on 
Common and Squares. But we all know that there 
is a continual charge tTiat there are rings inside 
of the City Government. People have said "Al- 
derman, have you got any land that you are going 
to put into a park?" I do not know 'how it is go- 
ing to affect gentlemen who have been here two 
or three years, but 1 know how it is witli a man 
who lias been here only two or three weeks. I wish 
to have a committee which will stand above 
any charge of rings. I want the public to have 
the same confidence in the report that we shall 
have. We should have confidence in the report of 
the Committee on Comnaon and Squares, but the 
public are continually insinuating about rings in 
the City Government. Let us avoid that. 1 tliink 
the Committee on Common and Squares should be 
a part of this committee. But 1 am in favor of 
going further, ami having th-.ee men, wliom the 
Mayor sliall select. I think lie will seltct three 
strong men, who are thoroughly acquainted with 
the sul)ject, and in w honi tlie public will have en- 
tire confidence. If we get a report from such a 
commission, both the public and the City Govern- 
ment wJll have confidence in it. 

Alderman Power — I cannot draw any other in- 
ference from the gentleman's remarks than that 
the public have not confidence in this Board of 
Aldermen. They think we are a trading set, who 
cannot do anything without some privaie interest 
being accomplished. I think his Honor the Mayor 
has confidence in this Board, and I do not see that 
■ three men from outside can purify them, or make 
them any more than tliey are ; they wiU not better 
matters much. Tlie gentleman reminds me of 
water. I said that, at the time he alluded to, we 
had no water works ; it Avas a new thing. I do not 
sujipose that there were any members of the 
Government who professed to be very great au- 
thority or exjiert in such matters, and' they had to 
look about for the very best talent to carry out the 
views of tlie people who desired waier. It 
became necessary to go outside and get cele- 
brated engineers and scientific nien'^ to look 
into the subject. But I do not see that our case 
here is similar to that. If any engineering talent 
is wanted the city of Boston has it. The Commit- 
tee on Common and Squares can avail themselves 
of their services witliout getting outride talent. 
I do not see any necessity for getting three outside 
men, unless they are men noted for tlieir ability in 
laying out parks. I suppose that our engineers are 
competent to do that sort of work, and I do not 
see that it is necessary to go outside and get any 
of that talent. I think that by referring this sub- 
ject to the Committee on Common and Squares, 
they will get a report to this Government much 
quicker than if we have an outside commission. 

Alderman Emery — I dislike exceedingly to disa- 

f;ree with my friend on my right, the Alderman 
rom Ward 12, for I always have to go over the 
subject again, reexamine and see what the matter 
is. Another reason is that he is so persistent, and 
furthermore lie believes in foraging on the enemy, 
and wherever he can find a sore spot he goes for 
it. Therefore, I hate to go against him in a mat- 
ter of importance. But in this matter we have 
the power of rejecting anything that the commit- 
tee may report upon. In regard to his refer- 
ence to the Committee on Common and 
Squares, I can add that this Board have 
undoubted confidence in that committee, 
who were appointed for the ordinary routine 
business of that committee without reference to 
the question of public parks. There is another 
and better reason than that why we should refer 
this subject to that committee. That reference 
has been rejected by this Board already, and the 
only question now is whether we shall appoint a 
special commission in concurrence with the Com- 
mon Council, and let them report at some future 
time the result of their investigations. I think 
these are good reasons why this Board should con- 
cur with the Common Council. 
Alderman Clark — I just begin to get a little 



B9 



BOAR 13 OF ALDERMEN, 



light on this subject and see how it stands. This 
subject was considered by the Joint Special Com- 
mittee on the Mayor's Address, and majority and 
minority reports' were presented. '1 he majority 
voted to have the subject of a pai'lc referred to the 
Committee on Common and Squares, and tlie mi- 
nority favored the raising of a special comnussion. 
The reports went to the Council, where the minor- 
ity report was adopted. It then came here, and 
we non-concurred with the Common Council. In 
order to clinch the matter in this Board and pre- 
vent it from goinfi' to the special commission, the 
Alderman from Ward 12 moved a reconsideration, 
■which motion was laid upon the table, and that is 
where we stand today. Am I correct ? 

Alderman Emery — A motion was first made by 
the AUlerman from Ward 12 to substitute the 
majority report— referring the subject to the Com- 
mittee on Common — for the order as it came from 
the Council, and that was rejected by a vote of 
6 to 6. The question then came upon adopting the 
minority report in concurrence, and that failed by 
a vote of 6 to 6. Then my friend from Ward 12 
rose to clinch that vote, ard kill the whole matter 
here, moved to reconsider, honing it would 
not prevail, and on my motion the motion to re- 
consider was laid upon the table. 

Alderman (lark— That is as I understand it. I 
voted to refer the subject to the Committee on 
Common and Squares, and shall now vote to refer 
it to a special commission, and as it is generally 
understood that 1 am in favor of a park, it may be 
expedient for me to give my reasons for voting as 
I shall. When I sigi.ed the majority report 1 did 
so becaitse I had confidence in the Committee on 
Common and Squares. 1 do not know any mem- 
ber of that committee who has land to seU for a 
park. 1 bi'lieve that they would have considered 
the subject fairly and reported in due time. I be- 
lieve that all the order contemplates is to take 
into consideration the feasibility of establi.^hing a 
public park, and 1 believe that committee are com- 
petent to consider that matter, and would make a 
report that will be satisfactory to the people. We 
have made an attempt to refer it to the Committee 
on Common and S(iuare-^,and failed, and we could 
not do so in the Council. Therefore I shall voce 
to concur witli the Council and vote to have the 
subject referred to a special committee. I believe 
the time has come when we should take immedi- 
ate steps for laying out and building a public park, 
and for one I do not wish to prevent carrying out 
the will of the people. My opinion is that the great 
majority of the public demand that this (Govern- 
ment take immediate action, looking to the laying 
out of a park, and I think that the only way to do 
so now is to give the subject to a special commit- 
tee. 

Alderman Power — The gentleman who last 
spoke states that the matter of referring to the 
Committee on Common and Squares cannot be 
carried in the Council. The minority repoit was 
signed by three members of the Council, and when 
the subject came up in tlu other branch the 
fourth member did not make any explanation of 
the subject at all. I have been assured by many 
members of the Council that if an explanation 
had been made, the minority report would not 
have gone through the Council, but that the 
majority report would have been adopted. It 
does seem to me that the gentleman acquiesces in 
the insinuation that this Government are not to be 
trusted to do anything, but they must go outside, 
when any large matter is tobe considered, for peo- 
ple to consider such new and important subjects. 
This seems tobe a reflection on this Government — 
that they cannot be trusted to attend to such mat- 
ters, but must go outside of this Government and 
fet gentlemen of standing, who shall act as guar- 
ians of this Government. I, for one, do not 
acknowledge any truth in the assertion that this 
Government cannot be trusted to secure an 
honest administration of the affairs put into 
their hands. This constantly going outside is like 
arettection. No one supposes that they are to be 
selected for any peculiar or particular merit, or 
that the city will gain anything by their being 
chosen. Nobody pretends to anything of that 
kind. I am oi>po-ed to it particularly for that 
reason. I think this Government can do the sub- 
ject full justice, and whether the different mem- 
bers may be opposed to a park or not, no one is 
trying to thwart the wishes of those who desire to 

five tlie Mayor's address respectful attention and 
ring the subject before this Government as 
speedily as possible. 

Alderman Worthington— I wish the gentleman 
from Ward 12 would be fair in his statement of 



what is advocated before this Board. I said noth 
ing about a lack of confidence in thi^ Government. 
I said the public would have greater confidence 
in the report of a special commission, with three 
members appointed by the Mayor, than they would 
have in that of a committee of this Government. 
I am willing to stand upon that. Here is a great 
movement, and of all men in this Board the gen- 
tlemen from Ward 12 >h()uld be in favor of it, be- 
cause it will do more good to his people than any 
other class, and I am surprised that he should 
say one word against it. The gentleman has 
spoken about having no engineers for the 
construction of water works. Why, what did 
last year's Board do? We have able engineers, 
but last year the board referred the subject 
to an entirely new Board of Engineers, and I have 
no doubt the gentleman voted for it;— he always 
votes for such good measures. 1 have entire con- 
fidence in his good sense, and 1 have no doubt that 
last year he voted for independent engineers, that 
they might make unprejudiced reports. All we 
ask now is to allow the selection of such outside 
parties as the Mayor deems expedient, that we may 
get an unprejudiced report— one that the public 
wiU have greater confidence in than they would if 
it came from the Committee on (Common and 
Squares. I wish to repeat again that I have en- 
tire confidence in that committee, so that he may 
not misconstrue my language. I want this ques- 
tion to be thoroughly ventilated, so that every cit- 
izen of Boston will have as much confidence in it 
as in any rejiort ever made to this Government. 

Alderman Stebbins— It is a credit to the Alder- 
man from Ward 12 that he is able to stand up 
here, independent of any class, and opjjose this 
measure, notwithstanding it may bring labor to 
those whom the Alderman styles his people. It is 
a low argument by which the gentleman appeals 
to him. I do not like that style of argument, and 
I, for one, am willing to thank the Alderman from 
Ward 12 for staniling up here and opposing a re- 
consideration. 1 do not believe in this project. 
Our annual tax budget will soon be laid before the 
public. There will be half a million additional for 
the ordinary expenses of the Water Department, a 
great poroion of which will be for the 
outlying wards 13, 14, 15 and 16. There wUl 
be about $800,000 additional for the department of 
public buildings, principally for engine houses and 
schools. There will be a very large increase in 
other departments. Let us wait a few days and 
see how the people will like to have the rate of 
taxation eighteen dollars on a thousand. It has 
been remarked this afternoon that this i': the will 
of the people. Let us see how that is. Not a sin- 
gle petition for it has been laid before this Board. 
Where does the pressure come from ? It is from 
the parties who have land to sell to the city. Well 
may the constituents of the Alderman f iom the 
Highlands ask if there is not a land ring in this 
project. I believe the pressure for tins whole 
thing is from parties who have land to sell to the 
city. I think it ill becomes any one to say it is the 
will of the people. If the ]ie6ple wish a park, let 
them come here with their petitions and ask for it. 

Alderman Tower— I do not think the gentleman 
from the Highlands meant to reflect upon me at 
all when lie s))oke of my people. My i)eople are 
pretty powerful in this Vity; they are the taxpay- 
ers, regardless of where they come from and with- 
out regard to creed, color or nationality, and I 
never supposed that I had done anything that 
would lead anybody to think that I would legislate 
more in favor of one class than another. 1 sup- 
posed that 1 was as free from creed or class as any 
gentleman in this Board. I came here to do my 
duty to the taxpayers, and not to act for any creed, 
color or nationality. The gentleman simply mis- 
construes my motives. I am not opposed to any- 
thing which will get at a fair expression of the 
feelings of the citizens of Boston on this subject. 
Our honored Mayor is no doubt in favor of parks, 
but I am in favor of as speedy action on the sub- 
ject as lie is. I did not mean to misrepresent the 
gentleman from the Highlands, but he speaks of 
rings being continually hinted at. I infer that 
he thinks a report would be more high-toned and 
inspire greater confidence in the putSlic mind if 
outside gentlemen were appointed to sui)erintend 
it, and act as the guardians of this Government in 
this matter. I do not wish to do anything against 
the full and speedy consideration of this subject, 
but I do desire to have it go to the Committee on 
Common and Squares, who wUl act more speedily 
than any special committee from outside. 

Alderman Clark in the chair. 

Alderman Cutter— The Alderman from the 



Fi:BRUAIiY 16, 1874 



70 



Highlands well says this is a movement of great 
magnitude. It is one of the most expensive 
projects that has ever come into this Government. 
I am surprised to see tliat in little over a year 
since the great fire of the ninth of November, and 
less than a year since the fire of May, by which 
this city lost over a hundred millions of property, 
— before we have got over that loss, — they have 
come here and tried to make us believe that it is 
our duty to cast our votes in favor of a public 
parlt. It cannot V)e that tlie taxpayers, the people, 
have asked for tliis, for when you see the press 
take hold of a thing you may be certain that a 
majority of the people are not in favor of it, but 
the press desire to make the people take hold of 
it. They know it is a weak subject, and they 
herald it before the people so as to get pub- 
lic sentiment vviought up on the subject, 
that some one can sell a piece of land for 
a park — and tliat somebody can take in part- 
ners with him who will be able to bring 
up public sentiment, that this body may 
dare to vote for public parks. Now, sir, if you 
will look at our avenues you will see that you can- 
not trot a horse on the pavements without danger. 
Look at Washington street, with paving that you 
cannot trot a liglit carriage over. That paving 
should be removed and block granite substituted. 
Look at Columbus avenue, which ends nowhere. 
It should run into the country. All our avenues 
should lead out into the country and be well 
paved, so that we can take our private horses and 
carriages and drive over any of tliem into the 
country. Look at the streets of Charlestown, look 
at the North End ; the pavements there should all 
be removed before this board should think of 
talking about a public park. We shall come in 
this year and ask for tliirteen hundred thousand 
dollars : we ought to have two millions, but I do 
not wish to tax the people too heavily. This park 
means an addition to the debt of twenty million 
dollars. Well has the gentleman said that this is 
a case of magnitude. I tell you it is so, and the tax- 

f)ayers of Boston nave not yet got over last year's 
oss so that they should even think or speak of 
parks at present. I beg of this Board to stop and 
think before it votes to roll u]) the city debt 
twenty million^ more. The gentleman says this does 
not commit us. In my experience in this Gov- 
ernment, when we start out we always get com- 
mitted before we get through. I judge of the fut- 
ure by the past, and I do not wisli to commit the 
city to this scheme. I would rather sell the land 
that we have, the Farm School, the Beacon-Kill 
Keservoir,— which bring no income, and which it 
is our duty to sell in order to lessen the debt of 
the city,— rather than go on and advocate a park 
to increase the debt of the city. 

On motion of Alderman Harris, it was ordered 
that when the vote be taken it be by yeas and 
nays. 

Alderman Prescott— The Alderman from Ward 
8 has stated that the people have never come here 
and asked for a park. That is true, but it is a 
matter which is largely dwelt upon in the Mayor's 
address, and in deference to the Mayor it should 
be referred to a special commission, rather than to 
the Committee an Common and Squares. I, for 
one, shall vote to reconsider, and shall then vote 
for a special commission. But I wish it under- 
stood that I do not commit myself either for or 
against a park. The gentleman cannot frighten 
me by speaking of twenty millions expense. This 
matter has occupied the attention of the public 
for many years. [The Alderman read an extract 
from the Mayor's inaugural on the subject of a 
park]. 

Alderman Power— I would like to have some of 
these gentlemen explain why they want three 
persons outside of this City Government? What 
reasons are there for wanting them ? I am not 
tenacious about this matter going to the Commit- 
tee on Common and Squares. I have said repeat- 
edly here that I am opposed to a public park, even 
if it does not cost two million dollars. I am op- 
posed to it at the present time because I do not 
think it is proper with the burdens that we have 
upon us ; with the money necessary for improve- 
ments that should be done in this city in the way 
of paving and laying out and widening streets, I 
do not think we should meddle with this park 
question at present. I think the time is coming 
when Boston must have a public park, but I do 
not think this is the time for it. As nobody has 
specified what they expect these three gentlemen 
to do— why gentlemen outside the City Govern- 
ment, possessing particular qualifications for 
laying out parks should be selected — I 



should like to have some one explain why they 
should be appointed. The gentleman from the 
Highlands intimated that he wanted them as 
guardians who could say they have looked after 
the members of the City Government, that there 
has not been any ring and the thing has been 
fairly done. That is all the reason I have heard 
given, and that is no reason at all. I think the 
public and his Honor the Mayor have confidence 
m this Government, and I do not believe the Mayor 
thinks it is necessary to have anybody outside of 
this Government to look after this matter. 

Alderman Emery — In regard to referring the 
question to the Committee on Common and 
Squares, that is all done with. This Board has al- 
ready acted upon and rejected that proposition, 
and I hardly think we can go back upon that. I 
think every member of this Board has perfect 
confidence in that committee. As to wliat this 
commission will do — tliat is just what we want to 
know, and that is just what'th-ry will report upon. 
The only way we can get the necessary informa- 
tion will be from their report. 

Alderman Cutter— I think it is very well under- 
stood why it is desired to have the commission ap- 
pointed by the Mayor. He is in favor of a park, 
and of course would appoint three men in favor of 
a park. I would state, also, that, although there 
is no petition before this Board for a park, tliere is 
a remonstrance signed by many heavy taxpay- 
ers. I suppose gentlemen understand that a park 
is an expensive luxury which can be indulged in 
only about four months in the year. 

Alderman Worthington — 1 should like to know 
how the gentleman gets his information as to 
whom the Mayor will appoint. 1 believe he will 
appoint a fair commission. He has a perfect right 
to appoint any committee he chooser;, and 1 think 
he ■will appoint an entii'ely fair one. I do not 
think the gentleman has any right to get up here 
and say the Mayor will appoint three men in favor 
of or opposed to a park. I think he will appoint 
men who will give an impartial report. 

Alderman Power — I hope the gentleman will an- 
swer the query as to what these three outside gen- 
tlemen are to be appointed for. 

Alderman Worthington — I think that has been 
answered so often before that it is not wortli while 
to reply to it again. 

Alderman Peters— I did not intend to dip my 
oar into tliis turbid sea at all, but I want to take 
just one or two strokes. I liave an answer to 
make to the important question of the gentleman 
from Ward 12. I shall vote to reronsider and to 
concur with the Common Council. 1 tliink the 
Committee on Common have as much business as 
they can attend to well. The Alderman from 
' Ward 12 is himgelf a member of the committees 
on Common, Bridges, Paving, Health and Ac- 
counts, chairman of the committees on Printing, 
Bathing — there is no use of stating more. I have 
stated enough now that you can fee tliat he would 
not have time to look into this park question. For 
that reason we want men from outside wlio can 
make a thorough investigation of the subject. 

Alderman Power— According to the remarks of 
the gentleman from Ward 19, we certaiily ought 
not to have any member of this Board on the com- 
mission. If what he states is the case, no member 
of this Board can give any attention to it at all, 
and we had better have an outside commission en- 
tirely. Although the gentleman has read over a 
list of committees to which I have been assigned, 
I hope he will name some public business coming 
under my charge which 1 have not attended to. So 
far as I am concerned, the Committee on Common 
and Squares will speedily and faithfully attend to 
this duty if intrusted to them. 

Alderman Peters — The Alderman from Ward 12 
is so valuable a member of the City Government 
that we want him to live through this year, and I 
for one do not want to tax his time so that his 
health will be impaired by overwork. 

Alderman Power — I claim to be no more val- 
uable to the City Government than any other 
member of this Board. This argument has been 
produced before. Gentlemen have sworn to do 
all the duties tliat will be put upon them, and if 
they do so, there is no necessity for these outside 
commissions. If they do not do their duty I ad- 
vise them to have these outside commissions. 

Alderman Hall— I understand that the question 
before this Board is on reconsideration. I would 
inquire of the gentleman from Ward 12 whether, 
if we refuse to reconsider this vote, we do not kUl 
the question of a public park for this year. 

Alderman Power— Decidedly not. It can be 
brought up in dijffierent forms, such as referring It 



71 



BOARD OF ADDKRMKN. 



to the Committee on Common and Squares. Be- 
caui-e 1 am a member of that conimittce is no rea- 
^^()n v\hy 1 want it to go tlicre. It loolied to me as 
if tliey had not (onlideiHo in the Committee on 
Common, or they thonuht tlie committee would 
not attend to it fairly. Becanse I have acl^nowl- 
edged myself opjjosed to jiarks, they may think I 
would try to throw obstaeles ia the way. I deny 
any such intention. 

Alderman Hall — I desire the ruling of the Chair 
on my (luet'on. 

'Ihe Cliairman — If this vote is not reconsidered, 
the Clnir understands the subject of a park to be 
killed for the present. 

Alderman Harris — Do I understand that it 
would not be competent for citizens to petition for 
a iiark. 

'ilie Chairman — It is always competent for a 
single citizen or any number of individuals to 
petition tliis Board to take tucli action as may be 
for the best interest of tlie community. 

Al leimnn Hnll— If I understand this whole mat- 
ter, it is the object of the Al lermau from Ward 12 
— it is his intention — to k 11 the consideration of a 
recommemh'tion in the Mayor's address. 

Alderman S.ebbins — I beg to ( oirect the gentle- 
man. If the reconsideration fals, I have a mo- 
tion all reatly that will over this point. 

Alderman I'ower — I repeat that I do not wish to 
thwart the wishes of his Honor the Mayor. My 
objection was to farming out st ch matters. We 
have been elec^eil to otiice, and have taken an 
oath to look af >er such matters as come before 
us. My sole objection is to farming out matters 
belonging to ihe ( ity Covernnient. 

Aldennan Worthingtoa — I would like to ask the 
genileman why he voted to farm out the matter of 
■water to outside engineers last year. 

The motion of Alderman Emeiy to reconsider 
the vote refusing to concur with the Council was 
carried— yeas 7, nays 5, as follows: 

Yeas — AJdeimen B.ooks, Clark, Emery, Hall, 
Peters, Pre cott, Worthington — 7. 

Nays— Alderman Bigelow, Cutter, Harris, Pow- 
er, Stebbins— 5. 

The question was on concurring with the Com- 
mon Council. 

Al lermau Brooks moved to lay the whole mat> 
ter upon the table for one week, but withdrew it 
immediately. 

The motion was renewed by Alrlerman Steb- 
bins and the yeas and nays were ordered. 

Yeas — Aldermen Bigelow, Cutter, Harris, Pow- 
er, Siebbius — 5. 

Nays — Aldermen Brooks, Clark, Emery, Hall, 
Peters, Prescott, Worthiagton — 7. 

Alderman Cutter moved thit the Board adjourn,, 
and Alderman Prescott called for the yeas and 
nays. 1 he motion was lost by precisely the same 
vote as the previous oae. 

Alderman Power moved that the subject be 
specially assigned to Tuesday, the 24th inst., at 
half-past four o'clock P. M. Lost— 5 for, 7 against. 

Alderman Stebbins inquired what the salaries 
of the proposed commissioners would be. He 
hoped i ome member of the Board would give 
the information. 

The Chairman — The subject of salaries is not 
under consideration, and, therefore, is not debat" 
able. 

Alderman Stebbins — I want the order to be 
right, and I wi h to know to what appropriation 
the expense is to be charged. 

Aid >nnau H dl— Tiiis mattor will come before 
the Committee on Salaries in due time, vifhen we 
get it in proper shape. 

Alderman Cutter moved that the subject be re- 
fer. Ill 1.0 i,ae Committee on Salaries. 

Aide. man Socbbin — I am serious in my inquiry 
as to what appropriation the expense of the com- 
mission is to be charge J to. 

The Chairman — No commission has been pro- 
viaea for yet. 



Alderman Stebbins — We have not quite arrived 

at it, but it is going very fast in that direction. 

Alderman Hall moved the previous question. 

Alderman Cutter — I made a motion to refer the 
question to tlie Committee on Salaries. 

Alderman I'rcscott — I rise to a question of order, 
that the Board is now solving a matter of doubt, 
and the motion to refer is out of order. 

The Chairman ruled that the point was well 
taken and *he motion was out of order. The ques- 
tion now was, shall tlir' main question be put? 

Alderman Harris called for the yeas and nays 
on the taking of the main question, and it was 
ordered, as follows : 

Veas— Aldermen Brooks, Clark, Emery, HaU, 
Peters, Prescott, Worthington — 7. 

Naj's — Aldermen Bigelow, Cutter, Harris, Power, 
Stebbins— 5. 

Alderman Tower moved to adjourn. 

Aldennan I'reseott raised tlie point that the 
previous (juestion having been ordered, a motion 
to adjourn is not in order. 

The Chair ruled that the motion was not in 
order. 

Alderman Stebbins moved to amend the order. 

Alderman Prescott raised the point that no busi- 
ness is in order until the vote on the previous 
question is taken. 

The Chair ruled the point well taken. 

Alderman Harris asked to be excused from vot- 
ing. 

Alderman Stebbins desired to know some good 
reasons for the Aldennan being excused. 

The vote on excusing Alderman Harris was yeas 
0, nays 11. 

Alderman Harris moved that the Board adjourn, 
and on motion of Alderman Power the yeas and 
nays were called. Lost— yeas 5, nays 7. 

Aldennan Harris moved to lay the order upon 
the table. 

The Chair ruled that the previous question hav- 
ing been ordered, no motion except to adjourn 
could be entertained. 

The vote was taken on concurrence with the 
Council in passing the order. 

Yeas — Aldermen Brooks, Clark, Emery, HaU, 
Peters, Prescott, Worthington— 7. 

Nays — Aldermen Bigelow, Cutter, Harris, Powder, 
Stebbins — 5. 

Before the vote was declared, Alderman Harris 
asked jierinission to change his vote, which made 
the result 8 for and 4 against the passage of the 
order, and the order was declared passed in con- 
currence. 

Alderman Harris moved a reconsideration of the 
last vote. 

Alderman Cutter moved to lay the motion to re- 
consider on the table. 

Alderman. Stebbins moved to adjourn. 

The motion was lost. 

Alderman Prescott called for the previous ques- 
tion, hoping it would not prevail. 

Alderman Cutter asked if his motion to lay the 
reconsideration on the table was not entertained. 

Alderman Harris called for the yeas and nays. 

Alderman Hall asked if the previous question 
did not take precedence. 

The Chair ruled that Alderman Cutter's motion 
to lay on the table was in order, and the vote be- 
ing taken on it, it was lost— yeas 5, nays 7. 

On motion of Alderman Harris, the main ques- 
tion was ordered— 7 for, 5 against— and the motion 
to reconsider the vote passing the order was lost 
— yeas 5, nays 7. 

Alderman Stebbins offered the following: 

Ordered, That , with such as the Common 

Council may join, be a committee to nominate, 
on the part of the City Government, suitable can- 
didates for the Park Commission. 

On motion of Alderman Stebbins, the order was 
laid upon the table. 

On motion of Alderman Cutter, the Board ad- 
journed to Thursday at one o'clock, P. M. 



73 



BOARD OF ALDEKMEN, 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

FEBRUARY 19, 1874. 



An adjourned meeting of the Board of Alder- 
men w:>s held at one o'tdock P. M., Alderman 
Clark, chaiiTnan, presiding. 

PETITIONS IlEFERRED. 

To the Committee on Health on the Part ryf the 
Board. L. Schnitzer, to occupy wooden stable for 
two hori-es at 57 Prentiss street, Ward 15. 

John Denvir, to occupy wooden stable for three 
horses on corner Market and Faneuil streets. 
Ward 19. 

Dennis Naughton, to move and occupy wooden 
Stalie for four horses on Smith street. 

To the Committee on Survey and Inspection of 
Buildinr/s. J. L. Mergaii e to erect wooden build- 
ing on Hopital whaif; Charles street. 

To the Joint Committee on Assessors Depart- 
ment. T. W. & J. H. Cox, that certain taxes as- 
Fessed on their estates in Ward 16 may be re- 
funded. 

To the Committee on Common on the Part of the 
Board. Mary Otis and sixty otliers, remonstrance 
agaii.st the removal of the Paddock elms. 

ANATOMICAL MUSEUM. 

Tha following was received : 

Boston Society of Natural History, 1 
Boston. Feb. 19, 1874. 
To His Honor the Mayor and the Board of Alder- 
men of the City of Boston : 

Genilemen— I have the honor to inform you that 
at a meeting of the council of this society held 
yesterday af emoon, the following vote was 
passed: Voie 1, Thit his Honor the Mayor and the 
Board of Al lermen are hereby respectfully peti- 
tioned noi. io again 1 cense any such exhibition as 
Dr. Jourdain's ? o-oalled "Mu^eum of Anatomy and 
Medial Science," whi( h was burned last June. 

Thi 1-0 ton Society of Natural History would 
respecif nlly represent, that the experience of this 
and similar exhibitions here and in other cities 
shows that they tend to offend decency and public 
morality, whil t subserving no good purpose ; that 
all proper exhibitions of human and comparative 
anatomy i> freely open to the public in the socie- 
ty's museum; moreover, that however seemingly 
f lee f om more gross indecency any so-c.»lled gal- 
ley of anatomy may be when prepared for inspec- 
tion 1 y th^ Committee on Licenses of the Board 
of Al leimen, there is reaso.i to fear that it would 
foon become again su< h a disgrace to the city as 
the exhib tion Tiurnt 1 ist June was. 

The Council of th'! Society trusts that the a^sUt- 
anci's made by Mayor Pierce that another similar 
f xhibition should not be licensed, and that the 
License Comm ttee of 1873, upon personal inspec- 
tion of what was iobo opened to the public, re- 
luse I a hcense to the same proprietors, will, in 
connection with the above reasoiis, have due 
weight witli the piesent License Committee of 
1874 in rejeciing the petition i ow again presented 
\)y the same paities, Dr. Jourdain & Co. 
l>y order of tlie Council. 

Edward Burcess, Secretary. 
The remonstrat.ee was referred to the Commit- 
tee on Licenses. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order to establish a grade for Athens street, be- 
tween F and Dot( hesier streets. I'asred. 

Order to bonow ^100,000, (o be added to the ap- 
propriatio;; for e.xien ion of Devonshire street. 
Pa^sed— \ea 12, nays O. 

Report "and order (City Doc. No. 26) to establish 
salaries for the several cily officers. Laid on the 
table till lit xt regular meeting, on motion of Al- 
deimaii f- tel bins. 

Order for the Mayor to petition the Legilature 
for auihoiity to make equital le charpes for the 
•ufe of Atlantic a\ enue in case it shoull be wid- 
ei led. 

Aldei man Stebb'ns — When this order was under 
Coii^ ii' era t on al the last regular meeting, I sug- 
gested i hat posjii ly there might be legal objec- 
>ioi s to 1; yii g out an avfnue with the view of 
/c}iaTgu,g lent for the u e of it. Since th"n I have 
taken means to ascertain fiom the legal adviser of 
the City Coun( il his ojjinion of the proposition,, 
and he sustains the objection I raised — that it is 



not in the power of the Legislature to grant to the 
city of Boston authority to lay out a street for 
public convenience and then to charge rer>t for 
the same. We c?,n aoply to the Legislature for 
power to take lands for market and railroad pur- 
poses, but I am not aware of any petition for an 
increase of the market facilities. To petition for 
authority to lay out a street as a public way, and 
then to charge rent for it, is clearly unconstitu- 
tional. Therefore, 1 shall vote against the order, 
because 1 do not wish to have the Mayor petition 
for an act which the Legislature will refuse to 
grant. 

Alderman Cutter— I do not know that I thor- 
oughly understand the order, but from the gen- 
tleman's remarks this is an order that we should 
not pass. It seems to me that we cannot vote to 
widen streets for the benefit of railroad compa- 
nies ; they should lay and take care of their own 
tracks. I do not see why we should pass an order 
of this kind, and I hope the Board will vote 
against it. 

Alderman Worthington — I do not think this 
Board is disposed to pass the order against the 
ruling of the legal adviser of the City Council, and 
I hope the members will vote against it. 

The order was unanimously rejected. 

Alderman Stebbins subsequently presented rcr 
monstrances from the proprietors of Central wharf 
and the Wet Dock Corporation, against the pro- 
posed widening of Atlantic avenue. Placea on 
file with the other papers on the subject. 

By Alderman Brooks, for the Committee on Sur- 
vey and Inspection of Buildings- 
Report on petitions of Thomas W. Carter, David 
H. Blaney and C. J. Donovan & Co., to erect wood- 
en buildings, with orders granting permission to 
erect the same. The orders were severally passed. 

By Alderman Brooks, for the same committee — 

Report on petition of the Inspector of Build- 
ings, recommending the passage of the accom- 
panying order: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Ordinances be 
reque.-ted to report an ordinance providing for the 
appointment of two additional Inspectors of 
Buildings. 

Passed. 

Order for appointment of a joint special com- 
mittee to nominate Park Commissioners on the 
part of the Common Council. Passed, and Alder- 
men Emery and Stebbins appointed said commit- 
tee on the part of the Board. 

miscellaneous reports and orders. 

By Alderman Cutter, for the Committee on 
Claims — Report on the petition of Timothy Gun- 
ning and others, to be compensated for labor per- 
formed on a highway in West Roxbuiy, in Decem- 
ber la t. The committee report that the work was 
not authorized by the Board of Selectmen of West 
Roxbury, nor by anybody having authority ; and 
funhermore, the public safety and convenience 
did not require that the work should be done, and 
it was not done in such a manner as to be of any 
benefit to the city. The committee recommend 
that the petitioners have leave to withdraw. Ac- 
cepted. 

By Alderman Cutter — 

Whereas, L. E. Pearson, late City Treasurer of 
Charlestown, paid, while acting in the capacity of 
said Treasurer, for forty-four police badges the 
sum of $110, redeemed by him under authority of 
an order of the City Council of the city of Charles- 
town, passed Dec. 22, 1873, it is hereby 

Ordered, That theie be paid to the aforesaid L. 
E. Pearson, late City Treasurer of the city of 
Chailestown, the sum of $110, upon his deliveij to 
the Auditor of Accounts the said forly-four 
badges, which the Auditor of Accounts will place 
in the hands of the Chief-of-Police ; said amount 
to be charged to the appropriation for Police. 

Read once. 

By Alierman Worthington — 

Ordered, That the Inspector of Milk be placed 
under the direction of the Board of Health, to 
whom he shall submit his expenditures for ap- 
proval, and to whom he shall present annually a 
report of the transactions in his office. 

Al Jerman Cutter— 1 hope the Alderman will give 
us some reason for that change. 1 believe that is 
the only department in this hall which is run both 
economically and well. As I understand it, the 
expenses are less than that of any other depart- 
ment in the Government. If there is to be a 
change, some reason for it should be given. 

Alderman Peters— 1 think that oruer should be 
referred to the Committee on Ordinances. 

Alderman Worthington— I can only say in re- 
gard to this order that it is desirable that the 



Fi^BRXJARY 19 



1874 



73 



R. J. Allman 2 

J. D. Driscoll 1 

T.J. CaUahan 3 

Tfiird Ballot. 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to choice 7 

D. J. Courtney 1 

J. D. Driscoll 1 

T. J. Callahan 3 

R. J. Allman 1 

E.J.Holland 1 

John Donnelly 5 

Fourth Ballot, 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

D. J. Courtney 1 

R. J. Allman 1 

John Donnelly 6 

T. J. Callahan 3 

E.J. Holland 1 

Fifth Ballot. 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to choice 7 

T. J. Callahan 4 

John Donnelly 4 

E.J. Holland 4 

Sixth Ballot. 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to choice 7 

John Donnelly 5 

T. J. Callahan 3 

E. J. Holland 4 

Seventh Ballot. 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

John Donnelly 5 

E. J. Holland 5 

T. J. Callahan 2 

Eighth Ballot. 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 8 

John Donnelly 5 

E.J.Holland 3 

T. J. Callahan 4 

Ainth Ballot 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

John Donnelly 5 

T. J. Callalian 5 

D. J. Courtney 2 

Tenth Ballot. 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

T. J. Callahan 7 

John Donnelly 3 

Daniel .1. Courtney .' 1 

R. J. Allman 1 

And T. J. Callahan was declared elected on the 
part of the Board. 

RAILROAD CROSSINGS IN EAST BOSTON. 

On motion of Alderman Stebbins, the order for 
the Mayor to petition the Legislature to pass an 
act changing the location of the Eastern Railroad 
in East Boston, so as to avoid the crossing of sev- 
eral streets, was taken from the table. 

Alderman Stebbins— I move to amend the order 
by inserting after the words "Eastern Railroad" 
the words "and the Boston & Albany Railroad." 
As the tracks of the two roads are side by side, if 
one is removed, both should be. 

The amendment was adopted. 

Alderman Cutter— At wliose expense "\re those 
changes to be made? 

The Chairman — The order suggests no appropri- 
ation to whicli the expense shallbe charged. 

Alderman Peters — I move to amend by adding 
"the expense of the same to be apportioned by the 
Railroad Commissioners." 

Alderman Brooks— This order emanates virtual- 
ly from the City Engineer, and I offered it after 
consultation with him, leaving the matter of ex- 
pense to be arranged at some future time. It is a 
question whether the city should be at any ex- 
pense in the matter, whether we should go to some 
little expense to prevent the railroads from cross- 
ing at grade or make some other plan. The City 
Engineer thinks this is the only feasible plan to 
prevent the dangers from the crossings that now 
exist there. The reason the order did not include 
the Boston & Albany Railroad was that it was 
thought better to deal with one at a time, and if 
we succeed in that, to take the other. I think 
there is no occasion for such an amendment as 
that offered by the Alderman from Ward 17, and I 
hope it will not prevail. 

Alderman Cutter— It seems to me that the order' 
will not have any vitality unless it designates who. 
shall pay the expense. It should state that either 
the city or the railroads shall bear the expense. 



Board of Health should keep the statistics of all 
these departments. There will be no real change 
in the d 'parment, except that the Inspector's re- 
port will go in with the report of the Board of 
Health. It is dei-irable that that board should 
have all those figures and put them into their re- 
port as a part of it. 

Alderman Cutter — I do not yet see the propriety 
of putting this department under the Board of 
Health. I think this Board can take care of it 
just as well as the Board of Health can. No doubt 
the Board of Health want something to do, for 
when there is no epidemic in this city there is vir- 
tually nothing for them to do. I hope the order 
will not pass. 

On motion of Alderman Worthington, the order 
was laid upon the table. 

By Alderman Harris, for the Joint Committee 
on Assessors' Department— Report nominating and 
recommending the election of the following - 
named persons for Second Assistant Assessors: 

Ward 1 (2 Districts)— John Noble, Daniel J. 
Sweeney. 

Ward 2 (2 Districts)— James E. Toner, John Do- 
herty. 

Ward 3 (1 District)— Joseph Allen. 

AVard 4 (2 Districts)— Martin Dowling, W. S. 
Whitney. 

Ward 5(2 Districts) — Horace Loring, Daniel J. 
Courtney. 

Ward 6 (1 District)— Emerson Coolidge. 

Ward 7 (2 Districts)— Dudley Pray, Jeremiah 
Sullivan. 

Ward 8 (1 District) — Ira D. Davenport. 

Ward 9 (2 Districts)— James Standish, Francis 
R. Stoddard. 

Ward 10 (1 District)— F. S. Risteen. 

Ward 11 (1 District)- George W. Skinner. 

Ward 12 (2 Districts)— Thomas Leavitt, George 
R. Dane. 

Ward 13 (1 District)— Edward W. Dolan. 

Ward 14 (2 Districts)— Elbridge G. Scott, William 
H. Mcintosh. 

Ward 15 (2 Districts)— Henry A.Drake, Isaac F. 
Atwood. 

Ward 16 (3 Districts)— John Pierce, George W. 
Conant, E. H. R. Ruggles. 

Ward 17 (2 Districts) — Henry W. Dickerman, 
George O. Currier. 

Ward 19 (1 District)— Jacob F. Taylor. 

Ward 20 (1 District)— Dennis G. Quirk. 

Walk 21 (1 District)— A. J. Locke. 

Ward 22 (1 District)— D. D. Taylor. 

The report was accepted and Alderman Stebbins 
moved to proceed to a ballot. Carried — 7 for, 4 
against. AJdermen Stebbins and Hall were ap- 
pointed a committee to collect and count votes. 
They reported as follows : 

Whole number of votes cast 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

Ward 1— John Noble, 12; Daniel .J. Sweeney, 12. 

Ward 2— James E. Tonor, 12; John Doherty, 12. 

Ward .3— Joseph Allen, 7; Charles H. Boardman, 5. 

Ward 4— Martin Dowling, 12; W. S. Whitney, 12. 

Ward ,5— Horace Loring, 9; Daniel J. Courtney, 1; 
John Donnellv, 4; T.J. Callahan, 3; R. J. AUman, 3; 
J. D. Driscoll,3. 

Ward 6— Emerson Coolidge, 3; John T. Prince, 8; R. 
M. Barnard, Jr., 1. 

Ward 7— Dudley Pray, 11; Jeremiah Sullivan, 12; 
John H. Wagner, 1. 

Ward 8— Ira A. Davenport, 12. 

Ward 9— James Standish, 12; Francis B. Stoddard, 12. 

War^ 10— F. S. Risteen, 11. 

Ward 11— George W. Skinner, 12. 

Ward 12— Thomas Leavitt, 12; George R. Dane, 9; 
Thomas Crawford, 3. 

Ward 13— Edward W. Dolan, 12. 

Ward 14-Elbridge G. Scott, 12; William H. Mcintosh, 
12. 

Ward 15— Henr^' A. Drake, 12; Isaac F. Atwood, 8; Pe- 
ter Mulvv, 4. 

Ward 16— John Pierce, 12; George W. Conant, 10; E. 
H. R. Ruggles, 11; R. Vose, Jr., 2; M. F. Lynch 1. 

Ward 17— Henry W. Dickerman, 7 ; George O. Currier, 
7: C. J. Page, 6; James M. Stevens, 2; Alden Bartlett, 1; 
Hugh Kelley, 1. 

Ward 19— .Jacob F. Taylor, 11; Michael Norton, 1. 

Ward 20— Dennis G. Quirk, 12 

Ward 21— A. J. Locke, 12. 

Ward 22-D. D. Taylor, 12. 

The gentlemen receiving a majority vote were 
declared elected on the part of the Board, and on 
motion of Alderman Stebbins the Board proceed- 
ed to ballot to fill the vacancy in Ward 5, with the 
following result: 

Second Ballot. 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to choice 7 

Daniel J, Courtney 1 

Edward J. Holland 1 

John Donnelly 4 



74 



B ( ) ARIJ) OF ALDERMK^ 



Alderman Peters — I withdraw my amendment 
and ofl'ir another, "th<! expense to be apportioned 
in a manner appioved by the Le};;ishitiirf." 

Alderman Harris — I would ask the Alderman 
from ICast Boston whether this order emanates 
from aiiy committee; whether any committee has 
considered it, or whether it is offered on his own 
res)tonsil)ility. 

Al.lennan Brooks — It emanated in the manner 
stated by me. I consulted the Engiiieer, and, 
also, the raving Commitiee as to what we i-hoiild 
do for the safety of public travel at tho^e cross- 
ings. I think the gei.tleman from AVard 17 has 
been consulted in the mattei', and he has the ideas 
of th' City Engineer in legard to the matter. It 
is a future con>ideration for the city and the Leg- 
islature to determine where the expense shall lie, 
if the changes are concluded upon. 

Alderman Peter- submitted his amendment in 
writing as follows : "The expense attending the 
same to be apportioi.ed in >uch a manner as the 
Legi>lature may determine." 

Al lerman brooks — I only object to that amend- 
ment for the reason that this Government will 
have no voice in the matter, which 1 want it to 
have. If the Older passes in that form the Legis- 
lature will have the determination of the whole 
thing; and it is n't i-afe to thedoveri ment to have 
thnt amen(hnent pass. That is my objection to 
the amendment. 

Alderman Power — I do not think we should pass 
anything here tlrat would deprive the city of a 
voice in the settlement of a matter of that kind. 
The expense involved in that order, if the project 
be carried out, would be hundreds of thousands of 
dollars — over a hundred thousand at least — and we 
ought not to i)ut it entirely out of our hands. If 
that amendment would have such an effect, I do 
not think it would be prudent for this Board to 
pass it. 

Alderman Stebbins— The facts in this case are 
simply these: For a good many years the people of 
East Boston have complained — and rightly I think 
— of the condition of the I'ailroad ciossmgs over 
several of their streets. As the population has in- 
creased the danger has also increased in propor- 
tion. Various methods have been de i^ised to ob- 
viate this difficulty. Last year we had this matter 
before us in the form of bridging the streets. 
The Paving Committee an;l the City Engineer re- 
ported that the bridges would cost half a million 
doUars. Now if these railroad tracks can be made 
to reach the depots by a tin uit of the island, even 
if it cost the city half a million dollars, it would 
be economy to do so. There are four streets 
■which should be bridged today. I think the peo- 
ple of East Boston have good reason for com- 
plaint and for asking the city to relieve them of 
this danger. Of course there is a great expense 
involved. These tracks cannot be changed at an 
expense less than $100,000. I think the subject 
ought to go to the Legislature in some form. 

Alderman Brooks — One reason I introduced the 
order was the special message of his Honor the 
Mayor on the subject of dangerous crossings. In 
that message he says nothing of these crossings. 
My idea is that his unfamiliarity with the locahty 
was the reason why they weie not mentioned. I 
can see no way that the Government can get rid 
of those dangerous crossings except the one pro- 
po.-ed in this order. Various improvements are 

foing forward in that section. There is a large 
ract of vacant land to be built upon in the future, 
which will continue to increase travel across those 
roads. Children are in danger every hour of the 
day now. I think, after looting the matter over 
pretty carefully, that there is no other way than 
this to do away with the danger, and if any relief 
is to l)e gainetl by tliis order 1 hope it wiU pass. I 
doubt the practicability of bridging those streets. 
The expense would be enormous, not only for the 
bridges, but for grade damages. 

Alderman Peters— If this petition goes to the 
Legislature, there certainly should be something 
said about the apportionment of the expense. I 
can put confidence in the Legislature and believe 
that body will do what is fair and just. 

Alderman Cutter — It seems to me that the amend- 
ment will cut us off too much from having a hear- 
ing before a legislative committee. The amend- 
ment does not add anything to the order, afceraU. 
I rose to make the order vital. While I agree with 
the Alderman from the Island Ward in the neces- 
sity of the case, still 1 do not want to commit the 
city to a scheme that will be unjust, because we 
have railroads coming into the ciiy from various 
directions, and if we commit ourselves to such a 
policy in East Boston, we might have some trouble 



with some other locality. I desire to avoid any- 
thing of that kind, but! do not want to have tlie 
order go to the L;gi4ature without any vitality. 
The amendment of the Alderman from Ward 17 
does not leave any vitality to the order. 

The amendment of Alderman Peters was reject^ 
ed, and the order as previously amended was 
passed. 

STONY-BROOK IMPRO VEMIJNT. 

By Ald(>rman Power for the Committee on Sew- 
ers — Keport in response to an order requesting in- 
formation as to what aciion is necessary to com- 
plete the improvements in tke channel of Stony 
Brook, commenced i>y the town of West Roxbury. 
By various acts of the Legislature in 1868, 1870 and 
1871, the town of AVest Roxbury (by commission- 
ers duly appointed) and the city of Boston, were 
empowered to take land and alter and deepen the 
channel of Stony Bioo for purposes of sewerage, 
or for the public health, and a plan was prepared 
for the coU'Struction of a new channel, with im- 
proved grades and lii:es in both municipal'ties. 
The West Roxbury Commissioners pi oceeded to 
take In nd and improve the channel so far as was 
possil, le, until the city of Boston had deepened 
the channel of the brook up to the dividing line, 
but the expense incurred by them, some 
$60,000, cannot result in any great improve- 
ment in the drainage of the valley until the 
city of Boston shall deepen the "lower por- 
tion of the clinnnel. The Committee on 
Sewers were advised by the City Solicitor, that the 
city would be liable, in proceeding uniler those 
acts, to pny damages for the contamination of the 
water of Stony Brook, which is now used by sev- 
eral manufactories, and upon consultation with 
various owners along the line of improvement it 
was found these damages might be very large in- 
deed. It seems to the committee advisable to 
procure an act to enable the city to take land, etc., 
simply to altei- and improve the channel of Stony 
Brook; and to provide in another manner for 
whatever sewerage may be required in its valley, 
and in this way to avoid the payment of excessive 
damages for water rights while the benefit to the 
low lands of West Roxbury will be substantially 
the same. The committee offer the following or- 
der: 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be author- 
ized to petition the Legislature for the passage of 
an act to enable the City of Boston to straighten 
and deepen the channel of Stony Brook. 

The order was passed. 

THE PADDOCK ELMS. 

Alderman Power presented majority and a 
minority report from the Committee on Common 
on the part of the Board, on the petition for and 
remonstrances against the removal of the elms on 
Paddock's MaU. The majority of the committee, 
consisting of Aldermen Power and Bigelow, recom- 
mend that the petitioners have leave to withdraw. 

The minority report is signed by Alderman 
Clark, and recommends the passage of the accom- 
panying order: 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
and he is hereby directed to remove forthwith the 
trees now standing in the sidewalk on Tremont 
street, between Park street and the Tremont 
House. 

Alderman Power moved that the reports be laid 
upon the table. 

Alderman Prescott — I hope that motion will not 
prevail. 

Alderman Cutter — I rise to a point of order ; the 
question is not debatable. 

The Chairman— The point is weU tiken. 

Alderman Hall called for the yeas and nays on 
the motion to lay on the table, and it was lost — 
yeas 4, nays 8, as follows : 

Yeas — Aldermen Bigelow, Cutter, Harris and 
Power — 4. 

Nays — Aldermen Brooks, Clark, Emery, HaU, 
Peters, Prescott, Stebbins, Worthington — 8. 

Alderman Stebbins moved to substitute the mi- 
nority for the majority report. 

Alderman Cutter— Before this order is passed I 
wish to beg the gentlemen of this Board to have 
some mercy on those trees. I have lately noticed 
them particularly, and I think there are hve or six 
which can be spared. If it is the design of this 
Board to pass an order of this kind, I move that 
the five of those trees which are in the worst con- 
dition be removed instead of the whole. 

Alderman Hall— I hope the amendment vnU not 
prevail. I have heard of men having wooden 
gods, but I never saw them displayed before in the 
halls of legislation. Those trees have long ago be- 



FEBRU AR Y 19 



18 74., 



75 



come cumbersome, and if we let them remain, it 
seems to me we are not doing tlie duty for which, 
we were sent here. I believe they should be cut 
down, and I am willing to take my share of the 
responsibility. 

Alderman Power — I hope the minority report 
will not be adopted in place of the majority. It is 
well known that thi"i matter has been before the 
Government at various times duririg the last three 
years, and tluring all that time there never was a 
petition piesented to this Board by any citizen of 
Boston asking to hive those trees cut down, bu^t 
there have been thousands of remons-trances 
against it, and I do not believe there ever would 
have been a petition come in here for it except 
that members of this Government wanted to get 
something to back them up in this action, or ap- 
pealed to people outside to get up these petitions. 
The order to have those trees cut down was 
to be put in here before, but some one sug- 
gested that it would be better to wait until it was 
asked for, and the order was delayed until the 
petitions came. A thousand of the wenlthiest tax- 
payers have come in here and remonstrated 
against the CTitting down of those trees, an at- 
tempt to cut down which has never been made 
in summer. It is well known to experts that 
they are the most thrifty trees which stand on 
a Boston mall. But they have been wilfully neg- 
lected ; the employ^; of railroad companies' have 
been allowed to drive spikes and hooks ii,to them, 
and every means has been taken to make them 
look as objectionable as possible to the citizens. 
There is no excuse for this haste, especially at this 
sea' on of the year, because those who favor the 
cutting of them" down well know that if they wait 
until summer, when they will be in foliage and 
leaved out, they could not succeed in passing this 
order here. But it has invariably come up at this 
season of the year. Therefore 1 say this order 
should not pass until summer. The amount of 
capital represented by the remonstrants ; hould 
have an opportunity to be heard. If gentlemen 
are disposed to cut them down, these peoj le should 
be afforded an opportunity to be heard. There are 
thousands of these remonstrants who desire to 
be heard, and they have not had a hearing before 
the committee. It is not proper for this Board 
to disregard such remonstrants who wish to be 
heard, and treated respectfully before this is done. 
Therffore I hope this order will rot be acted upon 
in this manner ; that action maybe deferred, and 
that my motion to lay the report and order on the 
table will prevail, until the remonstrants can be 
heard. I do not know that it will change any- 
body's mind, but I think it is due to the citizens of 
Boston that they should be treated respectfully. 

Alderman Frescott — I wish simply to ask this 
question : As the majority of the committee are 
opposed to the removal of these trees, why have 
they not given the petitioners a hearing? 

Alderman Power — We have not had time to give 
them a hearing. The chairman called a meeting 
of the committee and desired action, and we took 
the only course there was any opportunity to take. 
I supposed that the remonstrants would be given 
a chance to be heard before this Board. 
It Alderman Cutter in the chair. 

Alderman Clark— It is well known by members 
of this Board and the citizens generally that I am 
distinctly in favor of removing those elms, and 
that I have advocated it for two years. I do not 
believe that I have any right to stand here and 
vote away millions of dollars for public improve- 
ments and allow such an obstruction to the street 
as this. I want it published that I am in favoi of 
progress, and, furthermore, that I will not allow 
my vote to go unrecorded as not being in favor of 
that obstruction. If there were half the obstruc- 
tion on other sidewalks as those trees are, there 
would be petitioners coming in here bj' the thou- 
sand a king the city of Boston to remove them. 
I did not rise to make any argument for the re- 
moval of these obstructions, because none is need- 
ed in this Board of AI lermen. It is too ii telligent 
and alive to the interest of the city to oppo-e it. 
But when gentlemen say I called the committee 
together, and was in a hurry to act upon the 
matter, it is my duty to def ?nd my action. The 
Joint Committee on Common and Squa es w re 
called together yesterday, not to act specially upon 
this subject, but to consider the appiopriation for 
the coming year. 'Ihe appropriation was not 
ready, and having a little time on our hands, it 
was suggested that we might as well act on the 
question of removing the Paddock elms. The 
subject was brought up and the Alderman from 
Ward 12 did not suggest a hearing, but immedi- 



ately moved that the petitioners have leave to 
withlraw. Those are the simple facts in regard 
to the matter. I was glad to hear the Alderman 
from Ward 6 admit that five or six of those trees 
were a nuisance, because he has nlways been op- 
posed to cutting them down. No one can pass 
down that sidewalk without seeing that they 
should be taken away. There are other rea- 
sons; they have become exceedingly danger- 
ous, and if you wish any particulars, it 
is a fact that large limbs blow off during 
gales, by which the lives of passers-by are en- 
dangered. Last year' a gentleman told me that he 
saw a limb blown off which would have killed him 
if it had struck him. Those .trees have outlived 
their usefulness, thgy have become an eyesore in- 
stead of a tiling- of beauly. I believe that a great 
majoiity of the bu'-iness community would sign a 
peti.ion in favor of having them removed. It may 
be that a great many people who are obliged to 
earn their living by ihe sweat of their brows, and 
who have no occasion to walk on crowded side- 
walks, who do not care whether streets are widen- 
ed or not, would : ign remonstrances, but, for one, 
I feel that it is my duty to advocate their removal, 
because I am in "favor of improvements in streets 
and sidewalks ; jo I do not feel that I have a right 
to stand here and oppoj e so great an improvement 
as this will be, where the cost will be perhaps two 
or three new axes and a ladder or two. I did 
not come down to advocate their removal, be- 
cause it is uniecessary, but merely to explain the 
reason why no hearing had been granted the re- 
monstrants. Such a thing was not suggested by 
either member; had it been suggested and asked 
for by either member of the committee, of course 
it was in their power to grant it, as they were two 
to one. 

Alderman Power— The argument that the gen- 
tleman uses concerning the danger from those 
tiees, might justly be applied to every public 
buildiiig or tree in the city. Slates from roofs, 
and limbs of other trees will be blown oil during 
gales of wind as well as parts of these, but I have 
It from as good authority as any in Boston that 
those trees are in as good condition, and as full of 
life, as any trees that adorn Tremont-street 
mall. Although this matter has been discussed 
here for three years, not a single petition has 
come in asking to have those trees cut down until 
members went out and asked people to send them 
in. If nine-tenths of the people desire to have 
them cut down, why have n't they come here and 
asked for it? I believe there are a thousand who 
have remonstrated against it. The gentleman ap- 
peals to the intelligence of this Board. Two or 
three boards have acted on this subject, who had 
as fair a share of intelligence as this Board, and 
they did not think their constituents gave them 
di-cretion to sweep away everything sacred to the 
natives of this city. Those trees are associated 
with the (lays that every native of this city feels 
proud to think of —with the early history of the 
struggle for the liberty of this country,— and no 
wonder that the old settlers rise and remonstrate 
against this destruction. It is to those who earn 
their living by the sweat of their brows 
that such things are particularly dear. They 
reap unspeakable comfort from the shade of those 
venerable trees in summer. Nothing that we have 
goes to beautify this city more than our elegant 
shade trees. When the necessities of the case 
demand that the street shall be widened, it will be 
time enough to talk about cutting down those 
trees. That is another question, to come up here- 
after ; until then, at least, those trees should be 
spared. As I said before, I do not see why there 
should be so much haste to cut down those trees at 
a season of the year when they look bare and bar- 
ren. The gentleman alludes to the power of the 
committee to give the remonstrants a hearing. 
You have the same power here. If you have a 
majority, and are determined to cut them down, 
you can do it. They have stood over a hundred 
years. ^\ hy this urgent haste ? Is everybody go- 
ing to get killed? I want to give people who 
represent millions upon millions of capital 
to come iiere and express their opinion, at least. 
It i esms to me thxt the intelligence of this Board 
migh;: lake anoih r view of this matter if you listen 
to those who would appear here if they had an 
oppor unity to be heard. I hope this Board will 
respect he ;imount of capital and the number of 
peo le rspresented on those petitions. Gentlemen 
came in here last year for a fire commission. The 
eight thousand names were continually put before 
this Boar I, and everybody could not stand agiiinst 
it ; nobody could entirely disregard them. There 



7B 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 



is almost as much capital arrayed against this re- 
moval as there was for a fire commission. They 
come forward out of great respect for the associa- 
tions clustering around those trees. They did not 
have to be hunted up, as these few petitioners had 
to be ; they came on account of their love and rev- 
erence for tho-;e old trees. Therefore I hope this 
Board will j)ause and allow the people to come 
here and be heard. 

Al lerman Clark in the chair. 

Alderman Cutter — It seems to me that the Chair- 
man came down here to make an attack upon his 
own committee. He argued that the trees were 
dangerous on account of the dead limbs breaking 
off. Now, a,> chairmiu of the Committee on Com- 
mon and Squares, he has care of tho^e trees, and 
if there is anything dangerous about them, it is 
the fault of that committee. It is not the fault of 
anybody else. I see that the Committee on Sala- 
ries recommend that the City Forester's salary be 
increased; I should hope that they will look into 
the matter and see that he does not allow people 
to be killed by the dead limbs of these trees fall- 
ing off. The fact is, they have been letting the 
limbs hang on those trees in the hope that they 
might fall on and kill somebo ly. The soil under 
the trunks has been ploughed up, which is not 
fair. If they are to be removed let it be done fair- 
ly. If this Board is as intelligent as the gentleman 
says, let us have these remonstrants come up here. 
I moved to amend so that if this Board, in their 
rashness, were determined to cut down those 
trees, we might spare half of them. I do not 
think they ought to be cut down at all, but I can- 
not see any special reason for hurrying this mat- 
ter through today. 

Alderman Bigelow moved that the subject be 
specially assigned for half-past Ave o'clock P. M. 
next Tuesday, and that the remonstrants have an 
opportunity to be heard. 

Alderman Brooks called for the yeas and nays. 

Alderman Prescott — 1 move to amend so that the 
petitioners shall be heard. It seems to me that it 
is hardly fair for the Alderman from Ward 12 to 
censure this Board for not granting the remon- 
strants a hearing, when the majority of the com- 
mittee did not grant the petitioners one. I do not 
know what inve ligation this matter has had, but 
it seems to me with th" light I have upon the sub- 
ject that the elms should be removed. The peti- 
tioners as well as the remonstrants certainly have 
the right to be heard. I understand the gentle- 
man to censure this Board for not giving the re- 
monstrants a hearing, when the committee did 
not hear the petitioners. 

Alderman Power— I should certainly censure 
this Board if it did not give the remonstrants a 
chance to be heard, and if it is the intention of 
this Board to rush this order through. The Com- 
mittee on Common had no time to give the petition- 
ers a hearing. 1 stated that the Claairman called 
the committee together; his mind was made up, 
and he desired that we might make a report upon 
it immediately. That was why that report came 
in here today. I supposed that when it came in 
this hearing would be asked for. The remon- 
strants should have a chance to be heard. The 
gentleman opposite (Alderman Bigelow) moves 
that a hearing be had at half -past live o'clock. 
That is too late an hour. I have no objection to 
the petitioners being heard. 

Alderman Worthington— I hope the Board will 
proceed to settle the (luestion this afternoon. 
There is no question in my mind as to the necessi- 
ty of taking down those trees. They are in the 
way, are dangerous, and should be removed, and 
I hope we shall proceed to do so. 1 am not in 
favor of giving both the petitioners and remon- 
strants a hearing. We all know what they would 
say when they came here. We shoiUd hear some 
very eloquent remarks from gentlemen, telling of 
their extreme veneration for those trees, and a 
plea for their preservation because they have been 
there a hundred years. There was just as good 
reason why we should preserve the old Hancock 
House, and the old buildings in Dock square, 
which were removed. Now we ask tliat those 
trees may give way to business, as every other old 
tree has been made to give way. In Roxbury, the 
other day, an old elm, five times as thrifty a= 
these, gave way to the march of improvement; 
and that was the Warren elm, standing nearly di- 
rectly in front of (ieneral Warren's birthplace. If 
there is any reason for leaving these trees, there 
were vastly better reasons for letting that one re- 
main. I shall certainly vote to take action 
today. 

Alderman Power— If there was any necessity for 
removing those trees I should not object. The 



tree alluded to by the gentleman from the High- 
lands was in the way of improvement. When 
that question comes up I shall not say a word 
against the removal of these trees. But they 
are not obstacles to travel, but are simply 
in the way of pedestrians. They are on the 
sidewalk, and not in the street. The gentle- 
man knows that we will have some eloquent ap- 
geals if the remonstrants are privileged to come 
ere. They are taxpayers who have a right to be 
heard, and we have no right to refuse them this 
privilege. They are the people who send us here, 
and should be treated respectfuU". It may not 
alter any one's opinion, but still they have a right 
to a respectful hearing. 

Alderman Peters— I have passed these trees 
every day for several years, and think they are a 

Eerfect nuisance, and shall vote to cut them down, 
till, I think that as they have stood there a hun- 
dred years, they can stand till next Tuesday, and. 
I move to amend by making the time for the hear- 
ing half-past three o'clock. 

Alderman Hall — I cannot find that any one has 
asked for a hearing. Not a soul has come here 
and expressed a desire to be heard on this matter. 
These trees have stood there a hundred years. 
During fifty of those hundred years they have 
been nuisances to public travel. Today they take 
up room which the incessant tide of public travel 
demands. They are in the centre of the side- 
walk. That old elm in Roxbury stood in the cen- 
tre of the street, and there was room to pass on 
each side of it. These trees stand on ground which 
is wanted. I do not see the necessity of asking 
people to come here who have not" asked to be 
heard. Yet we are to invite them here to pro- 
test against it. I hope we shall pass ujion the 
matter this afternoon. 

Alderman Cutter — I do not think the gtntleman 
from Ward 10 takes the same line of argument 
that he did in regard to the stable for the Brig- 
ham heirs. Then he argued that a stable would 
depreciate the property of the poor. I am sur- 
prised that both he and the Alderman from the 
Highland District do not show sympathy for the 
poor peanut women under the elms. The Alder- 
man from Ward 10 seems to have forgotten his 
argument. I understand that the Horticultural 
Society has examined those trees, and they say 
they are good for fifty years more. From what 
better source can you get information than that? 
You cannot erect a tree in a year, nor in ten years, 
as you can build a house ; but you can demolish it 
it in an hour. The tree at the Highlands, just 
spoken of, was a thrifty one, but they had run a 
sewer, and gas and water pipes under it, and peo- 
ple began to think it was unsafe. It stood in the 
centre of the street. But there is no sewer or gas 
pipe under these trees, and if they are properly 
cared for by the Committee on Common and 
Squares there would be no danger from them. 

Alderman Hall — The alderman from Ward 6 re- 
minds me of the pity and charity due those old 
ladies who peddle peanuts under the old elms. 
Now, I would say that I am not at all acquainted 
with them, and I have made no attempt to inves- 
tigate into their business. For myself, I have no 
tenements to let. If the gentleman were to invest 
his money in a riding school at the South End, I 
think he would not derive as much benefit from it 
as from building houses to rent for particular pur- 
poses. 

Alderman Bigelow accepted the amendment 
making the time half-past three o'clock and to al- 
low botih remonstrants and petitioners to be heard, 
and the subject was then postponed to Tuesday, 
Feb. '23, at half -past three o'clock P. jVI., by the 
following vote : 

Yeas— Aldermen Bigelow, Cutter, Emei-y, Har- 
ris, Peters, Power, Prescott, Stebbins— 8. 

Nays— Aldermen Brooks, Clark, Hall, Worthing- 
ton — i. 

BOSTON COLLEGE. 

On motion of Alderman Emery, the order to al- 
low a change of restrictions in building on land 
purchased of the city by trustees of Boston College 
was taken from the table. 

Alderman Hall— Those gentlemen who have re- 
monstrated against the removal of those restric- 
tions have since said to me that they withdraw 
their opposition, and ask that the order be passed. 

The order was passed. 

On motion of Alderman Stebbins, it was voted 
that when the board adjourn, it be to Tuesday, 
23d instant, at three o'clock P. M. 

THE WATER liOAHD. 

Alderman Cutter moved to reconsider the vote 
passing the order for the Committee on Water to 



FEBRUARY 19, 1874 



77 



consider the expediency of consolidating the Mys- 
tic and Cochituate Water Boards into a paid com- 
mission. 

Alderman Stebbins— I hope the order will not be 
reconsidered ui less the Alierman can five some 
good reason for it. 

Aldeiman Cutter — I was myself trying to get 
Bome good reason for passing that order. 1 ht^ard 
none given before it was pas;ed, and I think an 
order of 1 his kind thoul 1 be well considf red be- 
fore it is passed. I su])po?e that if members have 
seen City Docui; ent No. 20, they wll know the 
use of this Water Loard. It was e-tablished be- 
cause it was necessary to do so. That same ne- 
cessity exists today, as when the board was estab- 
lished. ]f the Al.ennan will give good reasons 
for abolishing the two boards 1 wUl vote for the 
order. But I do not know any good reason for do- 



ing so now, any more than for abolishing the City 
Hospital. 

Alderman Stebbins — The order does rot provide 
for the abolition of any board. It simply requests 
the committee to consider the expediency of con- 
solidating the two boards, and of course whatever 
conclusions they arrive at will be reported back 
here for action. So far as it relates to the Mystic 
Water Board, by the act of annexation, the term 
of service of four members of that board expires 
on the 1st of A)iril, and it will be necessaiy to do 
something to fill the vacancies either by election 
or providing for a new board. 1 do not think the 
order can do any harm. 

The Board refused to reconsider — 3 for, 6 against. 

On motion of Alderman Stebbins the Board ad- 
journed to Tuesday next at 3 P. M. 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



78 



CIT Y OF B OSTON. 

Proceedine:s of the Common Council, 

FEBRUARY 19, 1874. 
The regular weeVly meeting of the Common 
Council was held at lialf-past fev n o'clock P. M., 
E. O. Shepard, President, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Annual report of th^ Superintendent of Streets. 
(City Document, No. 25.) Placed on file. 

Petitions were referred, in concurrence. 

Request of Committee on Streets for an addi- 
tional loan of $260,000, for extension of Washing- 
ton stieet. (City Document, No. 23.) Referred to 
' Committee on Finance. 

Report and order authorizing the Treasurer to 
' pay the amount of lost coui)ons on satisfactory 
evidence of their loss beinf^ produced, and other 
conditions therein named. Read once. 

Order for the payment of one-half of the fees for 
dog licences that have been received in West Rox- 
. bury to the West Roxbuiy Free Library. Read 
once. 

Order for the mayor to petition the Legislature 
for such changes in the law relating to the sealing 
of weights and measui-es as may be necessary to 
•, increase the efficiency of said law. Passed. 

Order to pay the Superintendents and Draw Ten- 
ders of Bridges in Charlestown and Brighton the 
same compensation received by them previous to 
the first Monday in .Jan\iai-y last. Read once. 

Orler that the income from the sale of lots in 
Evergreen Cemetery be set apart to defray the ex- 
I^enses of said cemetery. Passed under a suspen- 
sion of the rules on motion of Mr. Hunnewell of 
Ward 19. 

Order for Committee on Ordinances to consider 

expediency of amending the ordinance relating to 

the Law Department so as to either dispense with 

the semi-annual reports or provide for an annual 

. one. Passed. 

Order for Committee on Water to consider the 
exi)ediency of providing for the establishment of 
a s ingle board to exercise the powers of the Co- 
' chituate and Mystic Water Boards. Passed. 

Order for a transfer of jfSOOO from the Reserved 
• Fund to the appropriation for Bridges. Read 
once. 

Order to pay Henry C. Richards $25, on account 
of rent of Armory Company F, First Regiment 
M. V. M. Read once. 

Order to pav Captain James J. FIjmn of Com- 
pany I, Ninth Regiment M. V. M., $89 40, to reim- 
burse him for taxes paid in 1873 on armory of said 
company. Read once. 

Notice was received of the rejection by the 
Board of Aldermen of the order to print five hun- 
dred extra copies of City Doc. No. 29 of 1873. 
Placed on file. 

Reports from the Joint Standing Committee on 
Survey and Inspection of Buildings, with orders 
granting the applications of Thomas W. Carter, 
David H. Blaney and C. J. Donovan & Co. The 
orders were severally passed. 

Report from Joint'C ommiitee on Survey and In- 
spection of Public Buildings, with order request- 
ing Committee on Ordinances to report an ordi- 
nance authorizing the api ointment of three ad- 
ditional inspectors. Tlie order was passed. 

Reports from the Joint Standing Committee on 
Claims granting leave to withdraw on petition of 
William Gunning et al. to be paid for work done 
on streets in the town of \Vest Roxbury. Ac- 
cepted. 

Order for the Mayor to petition the Legislature 
to change the location of the Eastern and Boston 
& Albany railroads in East Boston. Passed. 

Report" cf Committee on Sewers, with an order 
for the Mayor to petition the Legislature for the 
passage of an act to enable the city to deepen the 
channel of Stony Brook. The order was passed. 

Or(ier appointing Aldermen Stebbins and Em- 
ery, with such as thp Common Council may join, a 
joint special committee to nominate members of 
the Park Commission to be elected by the City 
Council. Passed, and Messrs. AVilbur of Ward 9, 
Barnes of Ward 11, and Noyes of Ward 5 were ap- 
pointed. 

Report of Finance Committee recommending 
the passage of an order for the Treasurer to bor- 
row $100,000, to be added to the Devonshire-street 
extension loan. Accepted and order passed — 
yeas 66, nays 0. 

bridge" BETWEEN BOSTON AND CAMBRIDGE. 

Report and order for Committee on Legislative 
Matters to favor the passage of an act by the Leg- 
islature, authorizing the construction of a new 
avenue between Boston and Cambridge. The 
question was on passing the order. 



this evening. As I understand it, the application 
has been made by certain citizens of (Cambridge 
for authority to construct a new avenue between 
Boston and Cambridge, and upon this there is 
to be a hearing in the course of a week or two. We 
are entirely ignorant of w hat is proposed by the 
petitioners, and as various s< hemes have been put 
forward, I think the Council might not approve 
either of them as respects location or expense. It 
would therefore appear wise to let this matter lie 
upon the table uutd we see what the proposition 
is, or what action is desirable on the part of the 
city, and as the passage of this order will directly 
commit the city in favor of any scheme which 
might be brought forward, I therefore move that 
the order lie upon the table. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7— This matter has been con- 
sidered by the Committee on Streets, and they re- 
ported the order. If the order is passed it does 
not commit the city to any project whatever. '1 he 
petition has been sent to this City (iovernrnent 
askiiig that the Committee on Legislative Mf.ttars 
be instructed not to oppose the obtaining of au- 
thority to build the bridge. No location has been 
made, no streets are laid out. It is simply a re- 
quest for authority to build the bridge. 

Mr. Sprague of Ward 4 — It still seems to me to 
be unwise to take the action proposed tonight. 
The order is that the committee "be directed to 
favor" the passage of this act. Without any such 
order at all it will be the duty of the committee to 
watch the progress of the petition, and take snah 
action as may seem best for the interest of the 
city. Although the order does not commit the 
city in favor of any I- rich action, its passage will 
appear as an indorsement of any project brought 
forward. I see no injury that can re>ult from let- 
ting the order lie upon the table. There is action 
pending in regard to a park, and if a park is to be 
laid out, among the projects is one for using the 
water basin. If that bridge is constructed there, 
of course action should be taken with reference to 
the laying out of a park, in case that plan should 
be adopted. I renew the motion to lay on the ta- 
ble. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5— If I understand this mat- 
ter from a cursory reading of the report and order 
in the proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, it is 
a petition of thirty-six hundred citizens of Boston 
in favor of a new avenue to Cambridge, or in 
favor of aiding the citizens of Cambridge in their 
petition for such an avenue. I do not think the 
gentleman from Ward 4 apprehends what may be 
the efl'ect of the motion proposed by him. It is 
very well kno\> n, I presume — it certainly is by me 
as a member of the Legislature— that petitions of 
this kind will not be admitted after the 21i-t inst. 
(Saturday next), and if action is to be taken on the 
petition of thirty-six hundred citizens of Boston, 
it cannot be postponed, when by so doing it is 
suicidal to the petition. Unless we take action 
now, we will not have an opportunity to present 
this petition of thirty-six hundred citizens of Bos- 
ton for a new avenue to East Cambridge. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 6— As I understand it, the 
petition is already in. The question oefore us is 
simply whether we shall instruct the Committee 
on Legislative Matters to favor the petition. The 
suggestion of the member from Ward 4 is, that we 
should leave that committee to act as they may 
deem advisable, and not to commit the city to fa- 
vor what may turn out to be undesirable action. 
We do not know what kind of a biidge it is to be, 
nor whether it will interfere with any schemes in 
regard to the river. It seems to be rather un- 
necessary to go so far as to instruct the commit- 
tee, and it appears to be better to leave it to tlieir 
discretion. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5 — If the course pursued by 
the gentleman from Ward 4 is adopted, the oppoi- 
tunity for presenting this matter to the Legislat- 
ure wdl be lost. This petition has not been pre- 
sented to the Legislature. If we instruct the com- 
mittee, it will oi/ly be to a certain degree, and will 
not commit the city. There is no laud or street 
laid out ; it is simply that a new avenue may be 
built from Cambridge to Boston. There are s'ome 
two or three miles of territory from various points 
of which a bridge may be started. All 1 desire is 
to see that the petition of 3600 residents of the 
southerly portion of the city may get before the 
Legislature in time, which it cannot do after Sat- 
urday, under the very stringent rule adopted. 
After that we can instruct the committee how to 
act. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 6— The gentleman from 
Ward 5 must be mistaken (Mr. Crocker read tlie 
order). If there is any petition from citizens we 
are not required to vote that they shall not have 
the right to present it to the Legislature. If 1 am 
not mistaken, the petition from citizens of Cam- 



., -1 — \.^C ^l. .- 



79 



coMMOisr couisrciL, 



there ; we only instruct the Committee on Legis- 
lative Matters to favor a certain petition that is 
already there. 

Mr. Lorinp of "Ward 12— There is one very ob- 
jectionable feature in this order. It leaves the 
whole matter, even the location of the avenue, to 
the committee. Therefore, I shall be compelled 
to vote against it, or rather to lay it upon the 
table. 

Mr. Putnam of Ward 15—1 understand that this 
merely asks for authority to build a bridge and 
construct an avenue, if we wish it. Suppo.--e we 

fet authority, we can build it or not as we please, 
do not see any objection to passing the order. 
The only point is whether, having got authority, 
we cannot decline to budd if we choose. That is 
the only matter of doubt with me. 

Mr. 1 eabody of Ward 9—1 have been asked in 
times past occasionally to sign a petition for just 
such ah avenue as that, and I have generally 
found that it was started by the proprietors of 
flats on the Cambridge side of the river. I do not 
know whether this is one of that kind or not, but 
it does seem to me that the city of Boston has go- 
to spend a large amount of money on its water 
front, and it does not seem that this improvement 
is pressing at this time. 1 hope the motion to lay 
on the table will prevail. 

Mr. Putnam of Ward 15— It seems to me that if 
we get authority to build the avenue and bridge, 
it will be on such a location as the committee shall 
deem fit. It therefore appears to me that, if we 
pass the order, it does commit the city to some- 
thing, and I sustain the objection of the gentleman 
from Ward 4. 

The order was laid upon the table. 

FIRST ASSISTANT-ASSESSOR. 

A certificate of the election of James Dennie as 
First Assistant-Assessor, in place of Abraham G. 
Wyman, chosen by this board, was recei,ved from 
the Aldermen. 

On motion of Mr. Harrington of Ward 8, the 
Council proceeded to an election. Messrs. Har- 
rington of Ward 8, Barnes of AVard 11, and Wal- 
bridge of Ward 12 were appointed a committee to 
collect and count votes. They reported as follows : 

Whole number of votes cast f9 

Necessary to a choice 35 

A. G. Wyman had 33 

Christopher A. Connor 22 

James Dennie 11 

H. N. Holbrook 1 

A. R. Holden 1 

John Garey 1 

There being no choice, a second ballot was taken 
with the following result: 

Whole number of votes cast 69 

Necessary to a choice 35 

A. G. Wvman had 43 

Christopher A. Connor 18 

James Dennie 5 

John Garev 1 

A. G. Holbrook 1 

A. D. Capen 1 

And A. a. Wyman was declare! elected in non- 
concurrence, in place of James Dennie. 

BOSTON COLLEGE. 

Report (leave to withdraw) from Committee on 
Public Lands on remonstrance of Job A. Turner 
et al., against petition of Trustees of Boston Col- 
lege. Accejited. 

Report from Joint Standing Committee on Pub- 
lic Lands, witli or.ler granting petition of Trus- 
tees of Boston College for change of restrictions 
in l)uil ling on land purchased of the ciiy. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 6—1 desiie to offer an 
amen'Imeiit in the matter of form. When it came 
up before the Committee on Public Lands, of 
which I am a membei-, I made a suggestion as to 
the form in which it had better be tmt. At that 
time I was not prepared to give any form which I 
would recommend, but it seems to me that the 
form ill which that order is put is somewhat ob- 
jectionable and ought to be different. In this 
matter of releasing the conditions on land where 
the city has sold one piece subject to conditions, as 
in this ca-e, that the house should be set back ten 
feet from the street, and afterwards other houses 
are sold on the same conditions, and as the other 
parlie; have rights which should be enforced 
either at law or in equity, it seems to me that all 
the city ought to do in such a case as this is sim- 
ply to say tliat so far as the city is concerned it 
waives all objections, but it ought not to assume 
to change the condition. I think the term "change 
of condition" is something unknown to the law, 
and the legal members of the Council will agreie 
with me that that is an improper way to put it. I 
de ire to offer the following as a substitute: 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be and he 
hereby is authorized to execute an instrument, to 
be approved by the City Solicitor,whereby the city 
shall declare that it will, so far as it can lawfully 



and allow the present owners of the parcel of land 
on James and Concord streets, and Harrison 
avenue, conveyed by it to J. McElroy by deed 
recorded in Sullolk County, book 784, leaf 170, and 
the heirs and assigns of such owi-ers. to disregard 
the conaition contained in said deed so f.ir as to 
place a building on said land nearer than ten feet 
but not nearer than seven feet to said James 
street. 

The substitute affects the same result as the or- 
der to which it is proposed as an amendment, and 
is not liable lo the objection that we attempt to 
dispose of the right- of otln r parties. "We simply 
declare that the city will not intei fere, but the 
rights of third partii s— if iheie are ai.j' third par- 
ties who have any rights — shall be siife, and not 
that one shall assume to discharge the condition, 
and perhaps render the city liable for damages. 
Parties may say, ''You put that co..dition upon it, 
and you have discharged it ; now we will come 
back for damages." 

Mr. Dacey of Ward 20— If the college erects this 
building seven feet from the stieet, and other 
parties who have bought land there feel ag- 
giieved, who is to pay the damage— the college 
or the city ? 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 6 — If I understand the 
question rightly, I would state, thnt if anybody is 
damaged by that action, and if this sudttitute 
order is passed an I the Mayor executes the (ieed, 
I do not think the cbycan be lialle. If there is 
any patty injured by having a building set I ack 
ten feet, when he finds the-e parties putting it up 
he may apply to the Supreme Conn for an iij jui c- 
tion. I wish simply to save the lights of .ho e 
who desire it. I (lo not think ai.y of ih ; neighbors 
are injured to any apiJieciable degree; but if any- 
body has got ai.y rights there, 1 desire to save 
these rights for them. 

The substitute oruer was passed. 

WILSON'S HOTEL IN BRIGHTON. 

On motion of Mr. Ciowley of Ward 7, the report 
and order for the occupant of Wil on's Hotel, 
Ward 19, to be notified to vacate said premises on 
or befoie the fiist of April next (the special assign- 
ment lor half-past eight o clock), was taken up. 

Mr. Burditt of Ward 16 — 1 have nothing to say 
on this (juestion uiore than I have already said, 
except simply to add that the time is quite short 
under which we can act Uj on this ordei,andI 
-hope the matter will be acted upon tonight. As 
to the investigation undertaken by tho gentleman 
from AVard 5, i hope nothing will be done to inter- 
fere with that. 1 hope the order will pass. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5 — 1 have had a consubation 
with the gen.leman fiom Ward 16, who i-i chair- 
man of the I ommittee ou the part of the Council, 
and I have come to ihe com lu.-ioii that the matter 
which 1 broai bed at the last meeting will be as 
well, and perhaps better, tf put into ai.oiher 
shape, and by an understanding with him today I 
agreed i.ot io oppo^e the passage of the order. I 
shall meet the matter to which I have allude I in 
anothe: foim and direction. As it is desirabl > to 
have this order passed upon tonight, I withdraw 
all opjiosition to it. 

The Older was passed in concurrence. 

SECOND ASSISTANT A'lSESSORS. 

Report of < ommi. tee on Assessors' Department 
nominating thi ty-three Second Assist;int-Asses- 
sors and certificates of elections cf tliirty-three 
pel sons as said Second Ass isi ant- Assessors on the 
part of Ihe Boa d of Al lermeii. 

Mr. Hal ley of Ward 4— I move a suspension of 
the rule thac the Council may proceed to an elec- 
tion. 

The rule was suspended— r 8 for, against. 

The I'resi.lent— Is it the pleasure ot the"t"ouncil 
to proceed to an election ? 

The Council voted .o proceel to an election. 
Me~srs Brackett of Ward 10, Flyun of Wari 7, and 
Fuller of Ward 15 were aPiOint?;! a committee io 
recaive, sort and count votes. They re^.oricd as 
follow.- : 

Wliole number of votes cast 70 

N'lcessary tor choice 3 J 

Ward 1— John Moble, bC, Daniel J. Sweauey, BB; 
Cbarlcs R. McLean, 5. 

Ward 2— Jumis L. Toner, 70; John Dobert'-, 70. 

Ward 3— Joseph All 1.11, M; Charles H. Bjanlnian, 5; 
E. W. James, 1. 

Ward 4— Martin Dowbng, 60; W. S. "ftliitney, 70. 

Ward 5 -Horace borius, ol; Thomas J. Callahan, 37; 
EdwMi-d J. Holland, li] Daniel J. Courtii y, 24; John 
Douiiellv, 2; .)obn D. Driseoll, 1; William Mjoiity, b; 
K. •'. AUmaii, 1 ; 'llieo^liilus Matiniiis, 1. 

Ward 6— John T. I'mic % 57; Emerson CoDlid::re, 13. 

Ward 7— Dudley Tray, 47; Jeremiah Sullivan, 65; John 
H. Mairiier, 27. 

Ward 8— Ira D. Davonport, 70. 

Ward 9— James Standish, 70; Francis R. Stoddard, 70. 

Ward 10-F. S. Riste.n, VU. 

Ward 11— Geortie W. Skinner, 70. 



FEBRUARY 19 



18 74.. 



eo 



Ward la-Edward W. Dolan, 70. 

Ward 14-Elbridge G. Scott, 70; WiUiam H. Mcintosh, 
65. 

Ward 15— Henry A.Drake, 65; Isaac F. Atwood, 51; 
Pett^r Mulvev, 16; Edward Kellev, 7. 

Ward 10— John Pierce, 64; (Jeorge W. Conant, 61; 
E. H. R. Ruggles, 64; Robert Vose, Jr., 8; Michael 
Lvnch, 5; Ohver Hall, 4. 

"Ward 17— Henry W. Dickerman, 56; George O. Cur- 
rier, 51; Charles J.Page, 17; John Prince, 1; Alden 
Bartlett, 8; Hugh Kelly, 5; James M. Stevens, 3. 

Ward 1!)— Jacob F. Taylor, 61; Michael Norton, 9. 

Ward 20— Dennis G. Quirk, 70. 

Ward 21— A. J. Locke, 70. 

Ward 22 -D. D. Taylor, 70. 
And the thirty-three gentlemen having the neces- 
sary votes were declared elected on the part of the 
Council, in concurrence. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order authorizing the purchase of necessary fur- 
niture and .supplies for City Engineer's Depart- 
ment. Passed. 

Order to pay W. Smith and P. F. McGaragle, 
for the erection of the smallpox hospital on Swett 
street, $5000, the amount paid into the city treas- 
ury on account of insurance on the building, in 
excess of the amount advanced by the city, while 
the work was in progress. Passed. 

Order authorizing a transfer from the Reserved 
Fund to the appropriation for Common, etc., of 
$760; to that for Survey, etc., of Buildings, |3300; 
to that for House of Correction, $10,000. Passed. 

OLD MATHER SCHOOLHOUSB. 

The order authorizing the removal of the old 
Mather Schoolbouse from its present position to 
the city lot. Highland street, came up under the 
head of unfinished business. 

Mr. Burditt of Ward 16 moved to amend by 
Striking out the order appended to the report and 
to strike out the last clause of the report recom- 
mending the passage of the order. 

The amendment was adopted, and the report as 
amended was accepted. 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

The report nominating Thomas C. Amory, Li- 
verus Hull, Ira Allen and Samuel B. Cruf t as Over- 
seers of the Poor, came up as unfinished business. 

Mr. Shaw of W;ird 5— When I offeied the report 
of the majorily of the committee, I gave notice 
of my intention to offer a minority report and I 
take occasion to do so now. 

Tlie undersigned, members of the committee 
appointed to nominate four candidates for the 
Board of Overf eers of the Poor to take the places 
of those who e terms of service expire April first, 
beg leave to say, that in the exercise of the dis- 
cretion with which we are clothed by our appoint- 
ment, and according to our best judgment in the 
premises, we do not feel that we can in all re- 
spects agree with our associates upon the com- 
mittee in the conclusions arrived nt by them. We 
feel it to be our duty, in the light of the experience 
of the past and the facts presented by the demands 
of the present, to take advantage of such sug- 
gestions as are afforded to impiove in the 
future the management and control of the 
charities to be dispensed under and by virtue of 
our municipal authorities. In the exercise of 
the prerogatives with which the overseers under 
existing laws are clothed opportunities are often 
presented for arbitrary exactions from the weak 
though deserving poor by said board or some of 
its members or officials ; and notable instances 
have occurred in this direction, which have not 
escaped ob^ervation and criticism by individuals 
and the press ; forcibly reminding reflecting per- 
sons who have the best interests of humanity as 
well as the good of society at heart, that great dis- 
cretion should be exercised in the selection of in- 
dividuals upon whom shall devolve the dealing 
out of the city's charities. 

Kind and sympathetic words to the souls of the 
poor and ui fortunate are often as much needed 
as material aid and food for the body; and many 
an one has been saved f . onr destruction by an en- 
couraging word, being thereby led to fet 1 that 
"the world's cold charities" when thus conveyed 
may yet help him to h^lp himself. We are well 
aware that great discretion should be exercised in 
the distributions of the charities provided by the 
cities' authority lest imposition and fraud might 
be frequent, and the more deserving fare not so 
well as the importunate ; but let us say, in the lan- 
guage of our late Mayor on the soup question, 
"better that some unworthy person fhould be 
aided, than that one worihy person should suffer." 

The undersigned are not without some practical 
experience in the line of charities, and the care of 
those who by reason of mb fortune and cii-cum- 
stance are without the physical or moral force or 
ability to protect and provide for themselv es ; and 



selves of the general public opinion regarding the 
practical way of improving the efficiency of the 
board, and of bringing it more directly into line 
■with the sentiment and judgment of the times; 
and have been irresistably led to the conclusion 
that of the twelve persons constituting the "Board 
of Overseers of the Poor," three, at least, if not 
six, should be women, and of the four to be chosen 
thi< year, one should be a woman. 

It ajjpears to us that in no sphere in life can the 
attributes of woman be better applied to a prac- 
tical demonstration ; and we can cite cases with- 
out number, in the private charitable institutions 
of our own city, as well as throughout New Eng- 
land who«e boards of directors are composed 
largely of women; some of which boards have 
much larger amounts of funds at their disposal 
than has our Board of Overseers. 

It has been stated by some that the City Council 
has no more right by law to elect women to this 
board than have the people to elect members of 
the school board ; but such statements have no 
foundation in fact, and come only from those who 
are but superficial judges of law or logic. What- 
ever may be said of the laws governing elections 
by the people, such as those of school committees, 
they have no relation to elections by city councils 
— the rights, duties and respon-ibilities of the lat- 
ter being delegated and piovided in the charter 
upon the same general principles and conditions 
as are granted to corporations; "The Board of 
Overseers of the Poor in the city of Boston," be- 
ing a corporation, chartered more than a century 
ago (1772) by the Legi lature, which charter was 
amended in 1868, providing that the overseers 
shall be elected by The City Council. 

The City Council has the same rights and pow- 
ers to elect women to said board as has the Scliool 
Committee to elect women as teachers in the 
schools, which right is exercised by the latter 
without a question. 

Now we trust that the City Council will agrfee 
with us in making this slight change this year, 
thus allowing the opportunity for a fair tiial, 
being ourselves firmly of the opinion that such a 
change will inure to the best interest of society 
and mlly coiifonn to the growing sentiment of the 
age ; and that it will result in a decided impiove-. 
ment in the management of the board, and in en- 
tire satisfaction to the public, we are full of hope 
and confidence. 

"True hope is swift, and flies with swallow wings; 
Kings it makes gods, and meantr crcaturts kings.' 

The lady we have selected has had very great ex- 
perience in this particular bne of chaiities, as 
is well known, for several years past in 
this city, and fo. merly for several years in New 
York city, having there acted as a missionary in 
deeds of charity, and we are ei.tirely confivient 
that no person, male or fi male, can or will more 
satisfactorily peiform the duties required in this 
important trust, should she be chosen. 

We therefore recommend the election of the 
following-named persons: Thomas C. Am0i.y, Li- 
yerus Hull, Lydia M. Warner, Ira Allen. 

Geo. a. Shaw. 
S. C. Perkins. 

On motion of Mr. Shaw of Ward 5, the report 
was laid upon the table and ordered to be printed. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED. 

By Mr. Morse of Ward 13— Petition of Joseph 
Kiihns et al., that the walks in Orchard j ark may 
be gravelled and graded and a iievv fence put 
rouml it. Referred to Joint Committee on Com- 
mon and Squares. 

By Mr. Train of Ward 13— Petition of Ralph 
Haskins e< aL, that Maywooil and Savin stieets 
may he accepted. Referred to Committee on 
Streets. 

REPORTS AND ORDERS. 

By Mr. Davis of AVard 14, for the Joint Standing 
Committee on Armories — Reports on petitions of 
Company G, Ninth Regiment of Infantry, and 
Company C, First Battalion of Cavalry, Massachu- 
setts Volunteer Militia, recommending the pas- 
sage of the accompanying orders: 

Ordered, That until otherwise ordered, there be 
allowed and i)aid for rent of armory for Compaijy 
G, Ninth Regiment of Infantry, M. V. M., at No. 
11 City square, in the Charlestowii District, the 
sum of seven hundred dollars per annum, begin- 
ning on the first Monday in January, 1874; : aid 
sum to be charged to 'the Appiopiiation for 
AiTnories. 

Read once. 

Ordered, That, until otherwise ordered, there be 
allowed and paid for rent of armory for Comi any 
C, First Battalion of Cavalry, M". V. M., at the 
coiner of High and Pearl streets, in the Charles 



81 



OOMIVION COUNCIL. 



ning on the first Monday in January, 1874 ; said 
Slim to be cliai'ged to the appropriation for ar- 
mories. 
' R 'ad once 

By Mr. Fuller of Ward 15, lor the Committee on 
the .Iiidiciaiy — Renort ou orilerto obtninthe opin- 
ion of the City Solicitor as to the elifzibilicy of E. 
B. Spinnc y and A. G. Wymau to the office of first 
assi>tant-assesKor. 'I'lie City Solicitor is of the 
opinion that the section referred to in the order 
has no api lication to tlie eligibility of the gentle- 
men above named to the office. The report was 
acceptetl. 

By Mr. Tease of Ward 1, for the Joint Standing 
Committee on Water— I'eport (lenve to withdraw) 
on peiition of Daniel McDavitt, for an abatement 
of water tax. Accepted. 

By Mr. fease of Ward 1, for the Joint Standing 
Committee on Water— Report, in part, on po much 
of reporc of Water Registrar, in relation to 
changes in the present water rates, recommending 
the passnge of the accompanying order: 

Ordered, That His Honor the Mayor be request- 
ed to petition the Legi lature, now in session, for 
, the passage of an act requiiing i lumbers doing 
busiiicss in the city of Boston to obtain a licence 
f lom the board or 1 oards hiving charge of the dis- 
tribution of water in said city, and authorizing the 
City Council to make ^uch oidinances or rules and 
regulations in relation to the use of water fixtures 
as it may deem expedient. 

By Mr.AVest of Ward IB- 
Ordered, That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings be re(iuesle<l to consider and report as to the 
expediency of the employment of a permanent 
architect. 

I'assed. 

By Mr. Pense of Ward 1 — 

Ordered, That the citizens of Ward 19 be allowed 
to erect a railroad station near the Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir on the Woonsocket Division of I he 'New 
York & New England Railroad on laud belonging 
to the city of JSoston. 

Referred to Committee on Water. 

By Mr. Leach of Ward 10— Ordered, that the 
salary of an atlditional assi'-taut in the office of 
the C ity iMesseiiger be fixed at the rate of $-100 per 
annum, beginning on ihe 20tl; of January last; 
said sum to be charged to the appropriation for 
Salaries. 

The rules were suspended — 42 for, against — on 
mo ion of Mr. Leach of Ward 10, and the order 
was passed. 

By Mr. Abltott of Ward 3— 

Ordered, That in view of the many false alarms 
of flie lalely given, thus uselessly calling out cer- 
tain portions of the Fire De,iartment, it is hereby 
ordered, that the Fire Commissioners be request- 
ed to consider the expe dency of so altering the 
locks in the alarm boxes that when an alarm is 
given the key ih:it opens the box will remain in 
the lock till released by those having in charge a 
duplicate key. 

Referred to the Board of Fire Commissioners. 

FIKE COMMISSIONERS. 

Mr. Crowley of Ward 7 moved to reconsider the 
vote wh-'reby the report of the Fire Commission- 
ers was referred to the Committee on Ordinances. 

Tlie vote was reconsidered. 

Mr. Crowley moved the report be referred to the 
Committee on 1 iru Department. 

Mr. Noyes of Ward 5 moved that the report be 
laid upon the table to be printed. 

Mr. West of Ward 16— What is the point in the 
report? 

Mr.Crowley of Ward 7— They require an increase 
in the department of 150 men, and the Committee 
on Fire department would like to have tiuder con- 
sideration what appropriation ihey might require. 
That is the ol .iect of the reference I propose. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5— What is the amount of the 
appro ijriaiion tliey require for the current year? 

The President read the part of the report in 
reference to a change in the ordinance. 

Mr. Sliaw of Ward 5— The report, 1 think, had 
better lie upsn the table. If 1 understand it cor- 
rec^tly, the ordinance re(piires them to make cer- 
tain statistics ()f tlie appiopriation before the IStli 
of February. Tliey may have done so, but I do not 
know that they have, and if they have we have no 
knowledge of it. Again, another article requires 
something with regard to submitting the estimates 
to the C onimittee on Fire Dei)artinent. Now, I have 
been informed within a day or two, that the Com- 
mittee on inre Department have not iJassed upon 
the statistics, or even seen them. It seems tnat 
the Commissioners have not comijlied with *he 
ordinance. iMeuibers of the committee can state 
wheiher this is so or not, and 1 should be glad 
to know the facts. 



(i 



tory, in addition to those in the city proper, and 
the board want the number cut down to 150, and 
they want an ordinance to effect it. So far as the 
ordinance goes, to which the gentleman refers, I 
cannot get any direct information in regard to it. 
I am a little at a loss myself to understand the 
matter. It has been discu sed by the committee, 
and I hope in a few days to be able to clearly un- 
derstand it. 

Mr. West of Ward 16 — The present ordinance 
provides that the Fire Department shall consist of 
five hundred and fifty men. If the commissioners 
see the necessity of making the number seven 
hundred, I see no objection to it going to the 
Committee on Ordinances. I have no doubt the 
estimates of the commissioners will be submitted 
to the Committee on 1' ire Department. They 
should be, and unless the estimates are approved 
by that committee the Joint Committee on Apjjro- 
priations will not pass them. 

Mr. Shaw of Ward 5— My object was, to ascer- 
tain if the Committee on 1' ire Dejiartment are not 
to know what is being done. 1, for one, cannot 
understand whether the Commi>sioners have 
been doing anything or not. I want to know 
whether they "aie an autocratic power or not. 
I am as much to blame, perhaps, as any 
one else for the organization of the commis- 
sion, and 1 want to know whether or not they 
are responsible to the people. I understand 
that citizens have called at their door and have 
found "private" marked on the door. If the 
people are to be kept out I want to know about it. 
If the committee are unable to give the informa- 
tion, it is quite time that some ordinance should 
be framed so that the information can be ob- 
tained. I have been told by responsible parties 
that the Fire Commissioners are to ask for 4;750,00O 
for this year. I do not know but that is all right: 
I sui)pose it is, but the oiily way for me to find 
out is through the committee, i have asked the 
committee, and they say they do not know any- 
thing about it. 1 argued in favor of a Fire Com- 
mission because 1 thought it Avould be an econom- 
ical system, but I have yet to see anything of 
economy or action. I should like to get some in- 
formation from some source. 1 have asked the 
gentlemen upon my right and left. We are en- 
titled to that iiiforination, and ouglit to have it. 

Mr. West of Ward 16 — The oniinance provides 
that their estimates shall be submitted to the 
Committee on Fire Department. They should 
have been submitted before this. Also, it pro- 
vides that the committee shall exairine the ac- 
counts of the commissioners once a month. That 
is all the committee has to do. As to their having 
"piivate" on the door, I do not wonder at 
that. They are at woik, and do not want 
to be interrupted. I think it is better not to believe 
all these stories we haar. I have heard a great 
deal of talk about the commissioners, but I do not 
believe hardly any of it. It is time enough to find 
fault when they do anything wrong. That report 
should go the Committee on Ordinances. The 
commissioners have no power to employ men 
without the ordinance is changed. 

Mr. Crowley of Ward 7 — Why should not the re- 
port go to tlie Committee on Fire Department, 
who will obtain the necessary information? and 
then, if proper, it can go to the Committee on Or- 
dinances. 

Mr. Smith of Ward 10— I think the Committee 
on Fire Dejiartuient will be able to give the Coun- 
cil some information next week. At the meeting 
this week the commissioners had not made up 
their estimates, but 1 presume that at the next 
meeting they will give tlie committee more light. 

The motion to table and print was rejecteu 20 
for 21 against. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7 moved the reference of the 
report to the Committee on Fire Department. 

Mr. West of Ward 16—1 do not object to the ref- 
erence if it can be shown that there is anything to 
be gained by it. 1 do not object to their looking 
into the matter. All that 's wanted is an ordi- 
nance making the department consist of seven 
hundre<l men instead of five hundred and fifty. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 7— It appears to me that the 
same disposition should be made of all the reports 
coming from these commissioners as are made 
with others. Wlien a report conies from the Board 
of Health it is referred to the Committee on 
Health, and then reported back to the City Coun- 
cil. It is nothing more than fair that this refer- 
ence should be made. 

Mr. West of AVard 16—1 do not object to the ref- 
erence, but we frequently complain of delays. 
This reference will make another week of delay ; 
that is all. 

The report was referred to the Committee on 
Fire Department. 

On motion of Mr. Abbott of Ward 3 the Council 



8Q 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

FEBRUARY SO, 1874. 



A special meetiug of the Board of Al'lermen 
was held at two o'clack F. M., at the call of the 
Mayor. 

The Board took up the order passed by the Com- 
mon C'otincil, last evening-, requesting his Honor 
he Mayor to petition the' Leg;i> lature for the pass- 
age of an act authorizing the Board to require 
plumljers to be licensed, and to regulate the con- 
struction of water fixtures in dwellings and man- 
ufactories. 

The question was on passing the order in con- 
currence. 

Alilerman Hall said he did not feel like voting 
for a measure of this kind unless it was fully ex- 
plained. 

Alderman Cutter said the order looked too much 
like a job, and gave the Boston Board too much 
power. It interfered in a measure with private 
rights, and would prevent citizens from hiring 
such mf chanics as they jileased. 

Al lerman Stebbins s'aiil that it was a measure 
which had been adopted by other cities, and 
worked wrll. 

Aldermsn Cutter said it would have no better 
effect ihm licencing saloon keepers woul 1 have. 
The licensing of the latter did not improve the 
quality of the food in the least degree. 

By general consent Mr. Davis, the Water Regis- 
trar, explained that the course proposed was neces- 
sary in order that the city may not be obliged to 
call upon other cities or towns for an additional 
supply of water. A great wa te of water was tak- 
ing idace because of iiii)ieifect plumbing. The 
"Hopper closets," of which there were about 16,- 
000 in the city, occasioned a great waste, and it 
was necessary to prevent this waste from all 
Fources in order to retain a full supidy for 
the enlarged city. In reply to questions, Mr. 
Davis said the consumption of water average 18,- 
000,000 gallons a day, and the natural increase of 
consumption was eight per cent, each year. The 
full supply was being used and it woul 1 require four 
years to perfect arrangements f or a su rply from any 
of the sources already propo-ed. If the waste is not 
prevented in Boston, a supply mut be obtained 
from Cambridge, and that, even, woul Ibe limited. 
Only by a proper mode of fixtures can the city be 
saved from a lack of water from present available 
sources of supply. The people can be educated to 
believe that there is no necessity for allowing 
water to run to waste all night with a heavy stream 
flowing from the pipes. Recently the waste of 
water was so great in South Boston that many of 
the people were left without a supply. There 
were 20,000 fixtures in South Boston and eight 
men were employed to inspect the fixtures, caus- 
ing an expen e which would not be necessary if 
the plumbing was perfect and people educated up 
to the belief that there was no necessity for such 
a waste as was at present being had. 

Alderman Cutter oiiposed the order, and said a 
hardship woul I he inflicted if it passed. The 
owners of tenements and dwellings would charge 
the expense of changing fixtures upon the people 
who occupied the buddings, and it seemed to him 
that a hardship would I)e placed upon poor peoj le 
which they should not be compflled to endure. 
He believed in dealing liberally with citizens, and 
particularly with poor people. The order under 
consideration was sprung upon the ( ouncil, and 
had its nature been fully understood he doubted 
that it would have pass 'd in the other branch. He 
hoped the good sense of the Aldermen would lead 
them to vote against this order. 

Alderman Prescott was aware that a great waste 
was taking place, and measures should be taken 
to prevent it. This could only be done by some 
course of action similar to that proj/osed in the 
order. Such a measure would not be a hardship 
to any class. No one i.s allowed to give a concert 
until "he conies here for a license; boys are not 
to bJack boots without a license, 'ihe custom 
does not work arbitrarily. After the state- 
ments made to the Board by the Water Reg- 
istrar, it does seem an imperative necessity, 
in ovei looking the interests of the city, to 
save this water from being wasted. Four 
or Lfive millions of gallons run to waste daily. 



Why is it that the instant you put in meters par 
ties will shut off the water? It is because they 
save expense. Look at the hotels of Boston. 
They are saving of the water because every gallon 
runs through the meters which have been jjut in 
these large establishments, and has to be paid for. 
If the water were as free as in many places they 
coul I use a million gallons and not feel it; they 
woul 1 not then use the fixtures that they do now. 
They put on these self-closing stop cocks, and all 
departments of the house get along Mcll. The 
amount of water wasted is immense. We all 
know it, an 1, after the statement just made, we 
should take eveiy safeguard to prevent it. 
I have often thought of this thing myself, that 
plumbers are allowed to go into houses and put 
Oil anything they choose, so that one hundred 

fnllous would be used where five would suffice, 
f tor the statements made I feel justified in vot- 
ing for the order. In every other city in New Eng- 
land there are just such provisions as these. 

Alderman Bower thought the matter too impor- 
tant to be decided in such a hasty manner, and did 
not place much reliance in what other cities do. 
Other cities do tilings which Boston would not tol- 
erate. This may be a measure which woidd be 
arbitrary, make mischief and cause damage to 
the property of many poor people. It is a matter 
which ought to have been considered by the Water 
Board. 

Facts and figures should be produced, instead of 
questions which Mr. Uavis did not know he was 
going to he asked. The Water Board should tell 
us ju t what they want. We may pass something 
t :at woid I make a monopoly of the work and 
work a great hardship to many citizens of Boston. 
Mr. Davis says only respectable plumbers should 
be licenced. I do not see how that will do. Any 
man is liable to do improper work. It may 
be proper to do something, but it seems 
that the Water Board should compel people 
asking for water to give i.otice so that the board 
coul I have something to say as to the sort of 
waterworks to be )iut in. That board, I think, 
must have pow er, where they see fixtures in a 
house, .ilniost ceitain from its construction to en- 
danger the bursting of pipes and cause a waste of 
water. I do not see l)ut they have a right to take 
away the water from such a jdace ; they certainly 
have the right to prevent the water from being 
wasted. 1 1 liiiik the order ought to be referred to 
the Water Board, and I move that the further con- 
sideration of it l)e referred to that board. 

Al lerman Stebbins said Ihe subject had already 
been before the Water Board, and this order is the 
re lilt of their consideration. Last year the whole 
matter was ri f erred to them; they employed two 
hydraulic engineers to investigate the water sup- 
ply, and the matter of leakages was referred to 
the water registrar, whose report has been 
before the City Council for two months, be- 
ing a part of City Document No. 134 of 1873. It 
is barely possible that fome members may not 
know what the Cochituate AVater Board has been 
doing; if all reports be true, that board has been 
run very loosely, and it needs looking after. The 
report of Mr. D.avis was made in answer to an or- 
der of the City Council on this very subject. This 
has nothing to do with the Sudbury or Mystic 
river schemes; it is simply to save water 
ei ough to get along with until a sufficient 
supply is introduced from some quarter. No hard- 
ship will be done to the plumbers by the simple 
passage of the order. 

Al lerman Cutter said that whatever the Water 
Board may be at the present time, he believed th 
genllenian from Ward 8 had the honor of making 
the nominations this year and last. 

Aldeiman Stebbins 'replied that he did not last 
year. 

Alderman Cutter said the nominations were 
made to this Board, and therefore this Board is 
responsible for any inefficiency of the Water Board 
and for electing incompetent men to places on 
that board, although he did not know that he was 
ready to say that the board is incompetent, 
or that it is any less competent than the 
board to which the gentleman from Ward 
8 belongs — Ihe directors of ferries. He under- 
stood that boats had been damaged several hun- 
dred dollars, and no one had been held responsi- 
1 le for it. But let all that pass. There is no per- 
fect board existing. The Water Board was estab- 
lished for some purpose or other. The same rea- 
son exists today as when it was established. You 
can abolish it if you choose. The members of that 
board do a great deal of business, which occu- 
pies considerable time, and hear a great many 



FEBRUARY 30, 1874, 



83 



complaints from citizens. From his own experi- 
ence as an owner of real estate in tliis city, he 
"was confirmed in the opinion thnt an order 
■of this kind ought not to pass. When he was 
elected on the Water Board, he thought it would 
not do to let water run to waste in his house, and 
he gave notice to his tenants that they must not 
do so. The consequence was that it was all frozen 
up. The pipes would burst, and sometimes they 
would run all day and night, Sundays, and nobody 
know it. In his jurigment more water was wasted 
by the bursting of pipes than in trying to save 
water. He knew that the water closet IVIr. Davis 
speaks of is going to cost something like t wenty-flve 
or thirty dollars m excess of the present style. They 
have got to be put in at the expense of some- 
body, and you know that such expenses are most- 
ly imposed upon real estate. The owners of per- 
sonal property shirk it. Therefore it becomes this 
Oovernment hot to impose such a tax upon real 
estate. If this order had been so judicious why 
did not they bring it here in proper season, so that 
it might have proper consideration, and not bring 
it in at the last minute, jump it through the oth- 
er branch and then through this Board. This is 
no new subject and need not be rushed through 
the Legislature this year ; the members of the 
Board are hardly ready to vote for it, and he 
hoped they would refer it. 

Alderman Stebbins said the gentleman had 
twice intimated that this order had been forced 
upon the Board by the Committee on Water. 
Now, what are the facts? This report was pre- 
sented to this Board by the Alderman himself. 
Instead of referring it to the Committee on Water, 
he moved that it be placed upon file. It 
was supposed to be placed on file two or 
three weeks, when the question was asked 
why the attention of the Committee on Water 
was not called to it. It was answered that 
the member of the Water Board moved that it be 
placed upon file, though for what reason he alone 
best knew. An order was subsequently intro- 
duced for the Committee on Water to consider the 
subject. They met yesterday. The order parsed 
the Council last night, and this meeting is called 
today that the act may be passed at the present 
session of the Legislature. 

Alderman Cutter said it was the first time he 
knew of that; he presumed the chairman made 
such disposition of the report as he saw fit. He 
supposed he himself made a motion to send the 
report down. He had not said a word about or 
made any reflections upon the Committee on 
Water, and did not intend to. 

Alderman Worthington said the question was 
taking a very wide range, which seemed hardly 
proper at the time. We are asking that the Legis- 
lature may give us power for certain purposes. It 
is possible, and very probable, that we shall not 
wish to use it after we get it. The fact is demom- 
strated by the Registrar that we are losing 
four or five million gallons a day. He says 
we must save it, and states that we can- 
not save it now; we must go to the Legislat- 
ure. The question is whether we should pass this 
order and get the power, and to that question at- 
tention should be confined. Give us the power 
and then it will be time e. ough for the Aldermen 
from Wards 6 and 12 to discuss that question. He 
hoped they would pass this order and get the 
power. 

Alderman Power did not see that the subject 
had ever been before the Water Board. The re- 



port 

U'CS 



talks of two kinds of water closets— one 
so much and another lessj but it does 
not speak of any recommendations. Nobody 
even knows but what the Water Board 
have sufficient power to regulate this matter 
now. It looks very Improbable that the Water 
Board is compelled to put the water into a house 
where the fixtures are of suchji nature that they 
will not stand. It is ridiculous" to think th.it they 
have not power to regulate such an evil. The 
Water Board are the proper ones to come here and 
state what is to be recommended. 

The report does not treat the question at all; the 
matter ref Tred to those engineers was nothing of 
this kind. They were to go into the countiy and 
examine the Mystic Water Works and report 
upon the supply from there, and they have done 
it. 

Alderman Stebbins referred Aldeiman Power to 
the fir t page of the report. 

Alderman 1 ower said, he felt that the Water 
Board must have power to control the worlcs, and 
they are not obliged to put water in a house where 
the fixtures are such that the water will run to 
waste. If any man in the employ of that l;oard 
knows that the works are wroug and does not re- 
port them, he shoul 1 be discharged. 

Alderman Worthii gton referred to previous 
opinions of the C ity Solicitor, that the 1 oard was 
obliged to put water into houses when called upon, 
even if the water runs to waste. He moved the 
previous question. 

The main question was ordered, and the Chair 
stated that the question was on passing the order. 

Al lei man Brooks inquired what became of the 
motion of Alderman Power, to refer to the Water 
Board. 

The Chairman said the previous question cuts 
off all other motions. 

ALlerman Cutter called for the reading of the 
rule. 

The Chairman said there was no rule in regard 
to the previous quei-tion in this Board, but it is 
the custom in all legislative bodies that the previ- 
ou'' question takes precedence of all others. 

Alderman Brooks called for the yeas and nays, 
and the order was pasted, as follow : 

Yeas — Aldermen Bigelow, ( lark, Emery, Harris, 
Pre'cott, Siebbins, W oithington— 7. 

Nays— Aldermen Brooks, Cutter, Hall, Peters, 
Power — 5. 

A Merman Stebbins moved to reconsider, hoping 
it would not prevail, and Alderman Prescott called 
for the pre rious que-tion, and it was ordered. 

Al leiman Cutter called for the yeas and nays. 

Alderman Brooks moveu to adjourn. 

Al lerman Cutter said he would not oppose the 
order, except that a member of the Council had 
said if it hid been ki own what it was it would not 
have passed that branch. 

The motion to adjourn was lost, and the Board 
voted not to recons'der- yeas 5, nays 7. 



pet: 



:,N^S PKESEKTED. 



By Aldern i- etcis— Petition of Company A, 
First Regimen' rfaLtiy, for new armory. Refer- 
red to Committe ;nAii ories. 

Petition of T. C. ' 5we. to move and occupy small 
Stable at 62 Sarato:^ street, Ea-t Boston. Referred 
to Committee on Health. 

Petition of H. E. Cobb for auctioneer's license. 
Referred to Committee ou Licences. 

On motion of Alderman Worthington, the Board 
adjourned. 



BOARD OF AJl-Dii^RAlElSr 



84r 



CITY OLBOSTON. 

Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

FEBRUARY 34, 1874. 

The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Al- 
dermen was held at three o'clock P. M.,his Honor 
Mayor Cobb in the chair. 

EXECIITIVE APPOINTMENTS CONFIRMED, 

Spejial Police Officers— Edward Meloney, No. 7 
Green street and its vicinity; William S. Tutile, 
corner Kneeland and Federal streets and its vicin- 
ity; M. Shepard Bolles, Spring, street, West Rox- 
hury. 

PETITIONS KEFERBED. 

To the Committee on Paving. Theckla Muhe, 
to be paid for grade damage on Green street, 
Ward 17. 

Robert T. Paine, Jr., that the grade of Halleck 
Btreet may be fixed at grade 18, from Ruggles 
street, south, and that Halleck street be filled to 
grade from Ruggles street to Prentiss street. 

Orsamus Nute, for leave to sprinkle with salt 
water certain streets and squares between Wal- 
thim and Newton strrets. 

Hiram Ames et al., for construction of a retain- 
ing wall at the end of Yarmouth street. 

John Tibbets et al., that the "Town way" in 
Charlestown be graded. 

To the Committee on Claims. Zelotes Prince, to 
fee paid for injuries to himself and wagon from an 
alleged iiefect in Paris street. 

William hlms, to be paid for services rendered, 
the town of West Roxbury as road master. 

Jane Wool, to be paid for injuries received by 
allege! defect in Eastern avenue. 

To the Committee on JJealth on the part of the 
Board. Mrs. J. Montaine, to occupy wooden sta- 
ble for two horses on Everett sireet,Allston, about 
350 feet from River street. 

Perkins & Currier, to occupy a v/ooden stable 
for eight horses on Paris street, next to corner of 
Brooks stieet. 

Rt. R?v. John J. Williams, to move and occupy 
stable for two horses on Harrison avenue (Cathe- 
dral lot). 

J. E. Swan, to occupy wooden stable in Auburn 
street, near Fields's Corner, Ward 16. 

To the Comtnittee on Streets. J. C. Stimpson, 
executor, for abatement of Cottage-street better- 
ment (Wad 16). 

2'o the Committee on Sewers. Alexander and 
John McLaren, for a sewer in a portion of Prince- 
ton street. 

William Sayward et at., for sewer in Bird street. 

To the Committee on Survey and Inspection of 
Buildings. George W. HoUis, for leave to erect 
■wooden building on Western avenue, Ward 17, be- 
yond the legal uimenfions. 

ORDER OF NOTICE. 

The Board took u^p i he order of notice for a hear- 
ing on the proposed removal of a tree on the side- 
walk on the south side of Waverley street. There 
being no objection, the subject was recommitted 
to the Committee on Common on the part of the 
Board. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order to pay L. E. Pearson, late Treasurer of the 
city of Charlestown, §110 for forty-four police 
badges, returned to him by former members of the 
Police Department of that city. Passed. 

PAPER'S FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL,. 

Petitions of Ralph Haskins and Joseph Moon et 
al., were referred in concurrence. 

Report and order in favor of the removal and 
fitting wp of the old Mather Schoolhouse, at a cost 
of $9j00, to be provided for in the next financial 
year. Amended, in concurrence, by striking out 
the last clause in the report, and by striking out 
the order. The report as amended was accepted. 

Order to allow the citizens of Ward 19 to erect a 
railroad station near Chestnut-HiU Reservoir. 
R ferred to Committee on Water. 

Order to consider the expediency of changing 
the lo.ks on the fire-al irm boxes, so as to prevent 
false alarms of fire. Referred to Board of Fire 
Comm Esioners. 

Report "leave to withdraw" on petition of Dan- 
iel McDavitt, for abatement of water tax. Ac- 
cepted. 

Order to fix salary of additional assistant to 
City Messenger, at 1400 per annum. Passed. 

Order for Committee on Pu.tlic Buildings to con- 
sider the expediency of employing a permanent 
architect. Passed. 

The Report of Fire Commissioners came up re- 
ferred to the Committee on the Fire Department 
instead of the Committee on Ordinances. On 
motion of Alderman Peters, the Board concurred. 

ELECTION OF FIRST ASSISTANT-ASSESSOR. 

Certificate of election of A. G. Wyman as First 
Assistant-Assessor by the Common Council, in- 



On motion of Alderman Harris, the Board pro- 
ceeded to an e'ection. 

Alderman Clark said he was authorized to with- 
draw the name of James Dennie. 

Aldermen Harris and Peters were appointed a 
committee to collect and count votes, ihey re- 
ported as follows : 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to choice 7 

A. G. Wy man had 9 

Christopher A. Connor 1 

W. Gallag her 1 

James Dennie 1 

And A. G. Wyman was declared elected, in concur- 
rence. 

THE FRANKLIN FUND. 

Alderman Power presented the petition of Rob- 
ert J Gilkie f or a loan of $300 fiOmthe Franklin 
Fund. 

Referred, on motion of Alderman Cutter, to a 
joint special committee of three, and Alaermen 
Power, Cutter and Prescott were appointed said 
committee. 

LAND OF BOSTON COLLEGE. 

The report and order for removal of so much of 
the restriction on lands of trustees of Boston Col- 
lege as will permit said trustees to build witliin 
seven feet of James stred , instead of ten feet, as 
heiCtofore provided, came from the Common 
Council amended bj the substitution of an order 
in a dillerent form. 

Aldeiman Kmery — So far as this substitute for 
the original order, as recommended by the Com- 
mittee on Public Lands is concerned, I ao not favor 
concurrence with the other br;inch. 'J he oiiginal 
order was drawn wiih the unanimous approval of 
the committee, and, subsequen.ly, subinitied to 
the City Solicitor, who approved io. There can be 
no quettion that the oiig.nal order is unobjection- 
able, and is better than th« cubstitute. it was 
passed upon by the commiotee, and 1 hope this 
Board will afdiere to their former action, and 
that this substitute will not be adopted. Tlitre is 
not the slightest danger to the rights of the city. 
The order is so framed tliat the city's rights a^e 
entirely guarded and there is no possibility of any 
injury coming to any party living upon any of the 
sticets in the vicinity, it is only a lemoialof 
three feet from what the original order allowed. 
I was very much surprised tiiat there was any 
substitute proposed in the other branch. 'I he 
gentleman who made that proposition was present 
at the meeting of the committee and had laige 
consideration giVen to his views as he put them lO 
the committee. They gave him every opportunity 
and the order was clianged so as to meet his ap- 
proval in some thirgs that were deemed unneces- 
sary by the other members of the commie ee, a..d 
it \vas'^-upposed that everything was satisfactory. 
Other members of the commiutee will, I thiuK, 
hear me out in the position I have taken. 

The Board voted to non-concur in the passage of 
the substitute. 

REPORTS AND ORDERS SUBMITTED. 

By Alderman Cutter, for the Committee on Pav- 
ing — Reports on petition of Boston Music Hall 
Association et al., J. Sturgis 1 otter et al., recom- 
mending the passage of the accoaipanying orders : 

Ordered, That the court leading from Winter 
street to the Boston Music Hall, heretofore known 
as Central i lace, be hereafter called and known 
as "Music-Hall place." 

Passed. 

Ordered, That permission be granted to J. Stur- 
gis Potter to place a shaft across and above Per- 
kins street, upon condition that he shall first give 
to the city an agreement in writing saving the city 
harmless against any and all claims for uamages, 
costs and expenses on account of or in any way 
growing out of the erectii.g ana maintaining of 
said shaf across said Perkins street; also upon 
condition that he shall remove said shaft wnen 
ordered so to do by the Board of Aldermen. 

Passed. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
directed to fill with a^hes the city wharf lot on 
Medford street, Charlestown. Estimated co^t. 
$2000. 

Passed. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
directed \o repair tlie Longwood-avenue Bridge 
according to plans and specifications drawn by 
the City Engineer ; the expense thereof to the city 
of Boston, not to exceed the sum of seven hundred 
and fifty dollars, to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for Paving. 

Reau once. 

Ordered, That there be appropriated for the re- 
pair of the Dartmouth-street Bridge the sum of 
$292 48, in addition to the sum of $3000, appropri- 
ated for said repair December 10,1873; said sum 
to be charged to the appropriation for Paving. 

Read once. 



85 



BOAUD OF AL33EHM'EN., 



damages on Shawmut avenue, Ib W.aj'd 17, by the 
laisiiipof the grade of sniil avenue by the select-, 
men I f Wet^t Roxbuiy in 1873. ^ , , 

Uead oi.ce. ' ','■/) 

,. I^y Aldeiman Power, for the Committee on 
Se'N\er.'-— 

Ordered, Tlint the sum of iiriG 54 is hereby as- 
sc-ised ui on 'Ihoniiis I'arker fyr a sewer on C.ata>v- 
biisircet; tlmt SrlG 53 t.e abated fioni the asfesg- 
ment levied ui^on Alfred T^ (iray's ' he rs ffir'a 
sewer in Ft...Janies ,street; that ^112 C8 be abated 
from Cook, .Jordan & Morte for a>ewer in Wairen 
strt*et, and )irr>() 34 be a hessed upon James F. Dean 
aiul lifBG 34 upon David Haynes. A. 

Head on-.e. . . .-. 

liy Aliiermnn Worthington, for the Committee 
on rteorih— Reports granting the api>licationS"of 
Howard :L. Ilayford, lo (oustiuct C( liar below 
grade; John Denvir, John K. A\ il on, 1'. Mci'ar-J 
row, Asa M. Btubbs, Julia Driscoll and JVlich;iel F. 
Green, for leave to occupy stal le.s: and leave to 
■wiihdiaw on applicat on of INlicdiai lCon<ion to oc-' 
cupy stable; ;ind lecominending the reference if 
the petition of Decosta, llummer <& Co., for loca- 
tion tf wate^ closets rear Faneuil H;ill Market to 
Board of Health. Se\ei;'lly accepted. 
: By Aldeiman Worthington, for the Committee 
on Armories — 

Ordered, '' hat the armory of Company K, First 
Regiment of Ir.f.nnlry, Bl. V. M., ai "Washugton 
Hall, corner of Torchcster avenue and I orchetter 
street, be approved as a (-uitable place for the de- 
po it of arms and equipments. 

Pa-.' ed. 
1 Ordered, That the allowance for rent of armory 
fnrmeilj' oai upied by Company K, 1' irst Uogiment 
infantiy M V M.Vt >^o, \is Broadw-iy. b^ dis- 
continued from and after the first day of January 
A. D. 1874, and lliat the sum cf .^rlOOO per annum 
be allowed and paid fcor rent of armory now oc> u- 
pied by said company at ^Va^h iigton Hall, corner 
of Dor> liester avenue ai.d Do;clle^ter ftieet, be- 
ginning on the tir t day of January, A. D. 1874, 
an(i continuing until oiherwi-e ordered; said sum 
to be charged to the appropriation for Armories. 

Read once. 

By Able, man Emeiy, from the Committee on 
County Buildirg — Report on petition of mem- 
bers of Suffolk Bar, recommending that the pe- 
titioners be gi anted a hearing on Monday, March 
2. The report Mas aceeiJted, and, on motion of 
Allerman Emery, the time was fixed at five 
o'clock. 

By Aldeiman Emery, for the' Committee on 
Faneuil Hall — Report iii favor of grantirg the u-e 
of that liall to Alpheus Hardy et ai., for a fe>tival; 
and to James B. Watkii.s rt al., for a ball of the 
Good Samaritans." Ac epted. 

By Alderman Prescott— 

Ordered, That the Committee on Paving con- 
sider the expediency of changiirg the name of 
Broad t-trcet to Atlantic avenue, from it> intersec- 
tion with said aveiiue at Rowe's whaif to Federal 
street. 

Pasf ed. 

Ordertd, That the Committee on Paving be re- 
quested lo consider the expediency of (hanging 
the name of Clarendon slieet f .om Beacon s-treet 
to the Providence Rail: oad, to one that will con- 
tinue to be in harmony with the other stre< t Ipad- 
ing from Beacon street west cf the Public Gar- 
den. 

Alderman Prescott— In explanation of this or- 
der, I would state ihat ( larendon street fiom the 
Providence Railroad is disconnected from the 
other pait of the street by about a thousand feet 
of tenitory occupied by ihat railroad. Iheie 
have been a numl er of complaints by reHdents 
there that they have not lei n alle to 'give an ac- 
curate description of the locality of their resi- 
de nces to enal lo strangers to tind them. It is not 
an order to change the name of the street, but to 
refer the mat.er lo the Committee on Paving. 

The order was pasi-ed. 

1 y Alderman Emery- 
Ordered, 'ihat the Committee on Legislative 
Matters be authorized to look after and examine, 
in the intere: t of this city, all acts and pioposi- 
tions for annexation to Boston that have or may 
hererfter be bi ought b( fore the Legislature now 
in session; also to confer with parties ei gaged in 
the framing of ^uch acts looking to annexation, so 
far as the interest of this city is concerned. 

Pas-sed.. 

ty Alderman Ptebbins— 

Ordered, That the Chief- of-Police be instructed 
to prevent the placing or using of portable fur- 
naces, ovens or charcoal stoves in the jiublic ways 
or places of the city for the purpo e of melting 
lead, or tar, or for any other purpose, unless the 
parties i lacing or using the same take such pre- 
cautions as the Committee On Police or the Chief- 
of-Police may deem necessary for the public safe- 
ty nnd prtTivpnieiicp. 



Alderman Stebbins^It is a vciar.copunon prac- 
tice for plumbers orroofei-s to pint e a simall fur- 
nace on or very near the st<lewalk, and it is not 
ui f eqnently that accidents have been cans ed„ tt 
wa only the other day that a lady was passing 
thio; gli W inter ttveet I y one of thoi-c i^ mall fur- 
nace.', which exj loded "and injurecl h* r fao«. .1 
cplleu the attention of the Chitf-of-Pblice to, the, 
(•ubject, arid he ; aid it was necessary to jiass f:ucfY 
an order as this to give hiin proper con troLover 

t.Ji^'"- , . I) ■„•„ , i ■ '-; H 

The order was passec^.. , : ■ .... '.,„ , ', ',. .. -^ 

_ By Aldeimaii l.ig(low,for the Corhinfttee' on, 

Licen' es— Reports in favor of gi anting the appli-! 

cations of JJehemi.-di T. Merritt, 90 \V"a>hingi.or^ 

stiee , and Heniy E. Cobb, .01 State t tree.', for 

^'itctioncer's licenses; Isaac Bernstein, 52 Sal^m 

fitrc et, for leave id deal in second-hand articles ; J., 

E. Ingalls, A. C. AV hite, Otis & Co., for wagoij' 

licens-e; ; C. Wells, Jr., ei a/., for transfer tf wagon 

licenses; iVIary Bird, lO t cep intelligence office fit, 

32 Ph 11 ps street ; ^ arah Robbins, to k^'ep inttl'i-. 

gen< e office at liiG Ti rmont stieet; Kate M. Dris-, 

coll, for transfer of 1 cense for intelligence office ;• 

aiid leave to wi hdravv on applitation of Jamts E.. 

Bigtlow for auc ioneei's license at 113 NVashiiigton 

ft eet; 1 lanchard & Rosstooptn theatre at 578 

AVashingion street, reveirlly accepted. 

By Alderman Harris, for the Committee on 
Streets- 
Report on pe ition of Martha anil Caroline A. 
Sumn r, for abat ment of Co tagi -street better- 
mem, that the assessment referred to is a proper 
one for the petiioners to pny, ami that they have 
leave to withdraw. In the matter of gratle tiam- 
ages pttiticnetl for, the commit: ee report that 
they ha. e no jurisdiction. Accepted. 

Rei o.t on pe. ition of Jame^ Leeds, trustee to 
be allowed ii.ierest on sum awarded him by the 
city, that the petitioner has been paid for the land 
taken from the estate named, he acknowleilging 
full satisfaction therefor, and no further action is 
requi eJ. Atcepted. 

(ureter giv ng notice to Rodney S. Laken, Syl- 
vester H.RoiJis, heiis of Daniel iJowd, and heirs 
of Abraham Barker, and all others intereNted, tore- 
move obstiuctions stand;ng on or projecting over 
the lines of Luttis street, on or before the first day 
cf June next. Passeil. 

Oreler giving notice to James Dolan, Jr., et al., 
to ;emove obsiruciions cf eveiysort standing on 
or jirojecting over the lines ot' 31agazine street, 
on 01 before June fir, t, next. Bassen. 

Order to pay the Epi copal City Mission $15,492, 
forlintl taken in the name of tlie piOi.rietors of 
St. htCx lien's Cliunli, by the widening of Pur- 
chase street. Passed. 

Report on petition of James W. Gerard, Jr., 
cf a/., recommenuiiig the passage of an order to 
pay .). W. Gerard, Jr., F. C. T. Buckley and Eltza- 
LeiU f'. Wigg n, irlit9 CG for land, taken n laying 
out and exutiiuii g Will anis street, by the town of 
"West Roxbury, August il, 1873. Order read once. 

REMOVAL OF TUTL PADDOCK ELMS. 

Alle) man (lark c;dled up the special assign- 
ment to: half-past three o'clock, being the public 
heaii gcf all j aities in favor of or opposed to 
the proiioseel removal tf the Padtiock ehns fiom 
the sidewalk of T.emont street. 

The ( h tirman s. ated that since the last meet- 
ing a remoiistiane e against saitl removal had been 
receive 1 from H. 1' loy^i Faulkner, ei aL,oceupants 
of Stud o Bukling. 

Tlie re mou' trants w ere first called upon. 

Hon. S; mtielM. (;uincy said he did not appear 
first lo lake the leadership, but because of a busi- 
ness (ngagement, requiring him to b ave early. 
He wished there cold I be a iiul lie verdict on the 
sul jei t ; and if a -verdict of the great mass of our 
citizens could 1 e oldained that the obstruction 
and inconvenience elemanded the removal of the 
trees, he shonlel say, where the offence lies, there 
let the axe fall. If these trees could be swept 
away, it would no doubt be a convenience to the 
horre radioad, but is there absolute certainty that 
ten years hei te the la Iroad station wiU be where 
itiiowis? Hebelirveel tlint in a few years the 
control of horse raiboatls will pass into the hands 
of the local authorities. Last year he had ad- 
voeiteel : uch a bill at the State House, but it had 
been dc f eated. If in a year or two such power i' giv- 
en the Board of Ableimen, a st:ong argument wiU 
be presented in favor of a rearrangement of the 
rail oad tracks in the city. It is tlainieel that 
there should not be a double track on'lremont 
stree t above Boyl- ton street. In view of the nar- 
rowness of the street, the present lo^ ation of the 
station will Inave to be removed. Experts say 
there are fifty years' bfe in all those trees excejit 
one. The. r loots elraw lif e from soil which is al- 
mo t sacred. If the convei ience of peelestrians 
doe.- not call for this removal, are there any other 
rgauments in favor of it? >N hen the attack was 

mndA mi thpii"» bpfnro tlio m'o-m-nf 



FEB.R-UAR-Y S4 



1874r. 



86 



ous rurality was brought forward. They raay be 
incoiifjjruous, but they are certainly a rehef to the 
eye after gazing on the brick wails. T-he tenti- 
mental argument in this case was the same that 
the speaker had made at the State House for the 
old South Church. It is best to spare these feat- 
ures of historic Bo ton as long a^ possible. The 
trees are historic featui'es on the fate of old Bos- 
ton, and should not be sacrificed to the conven- 
ience of a railway corporation or its passengers. 

Mr. Peter T. Homer was impressed with the re- 
marks of Mr. Quincy in regard to historic Boston. 
He alluded to the veneration of people for old 
trees. The Paddock elms had been seen by men 
of the la t and present century; Adams and Han- 
cock had walked beneath them; and today they 
are a beautiful ensemble of a thrifty tree. They 
identify us with the remains of our ancestors in 
the Granary Burying (iiound — and what more 
beautiful object could be put at the entrance to 
that spot? He had often looked at and admired 
the piei;ty groups of people standing there ; it is a 
resting place — why shouldn't there be some 
■ regard for the poetical feature of Ife? Mr. Ho- 
mer closed by repeating the familiar lines, "Wood- 
man, spare that tree," etc., adapted to the occa- 
Bion. 

Mr. E. S. Rand, Jr., said that if it is necessary to 
move the trees for a public improvement they will 
have to go, but they have a right to remain until 
. such removal is called for. He could not see that 
they are all decayed. Two only are decayed. 
The'y have not been treated faiily. 'llie two uead 
ones would not be in the condition they are now if 
they had been properly treated. If a little care is 
bestowed upon them now it is not too late to pre- 
serve them for future years. J he speaker said 
the total w idth of the sidewalk on the west side is 
fifteen feet fight inches; the average diameter of 
the trees is three feet six inches, leaving a side- 
walk of twelve feet two inches, while the width of 
the sidewalk iu front, of Studio Building is but 
nine feet ten inches. During the half 
hour, today, between half-pasi, eleven and twelve 
o'clock, 5S1 peo, le had passed on the west- 
erly side, including those who were waiting 
for the horse cars. During the same time 
twenty-eight hundred people passed on the east- 
erly side. Alderman t-tebbins called Mr. 
Rand's attention to the report of the police, 
that between 7 A. M. and 7 P. M., 35,000 persons 
had passed on the west side. Mr. Rand said the 
trees weie tine samples of the English ehn. The 
English elm naturally begins to deeay at the top. 
The attaeli has always been made when the trees 
are looking worst, i here are hundreds who have 
been thankful for the shade they attorded in sum- 
mer, who would regret to .see them removed. 
"Whence these petitions spring he could not say, 
but he thought the names of the remonstrants 
ought to have great weight. They represent mil- 
lions of taxable property. They aie not those 
who would carelessly affix their nanies to any peti- 
tion or remonstrance. He also appeared for the 
Ma'^sachusetts Horticultural Society. 

Mr. W. C. Strong, President of the Massachu- 
BCtts Horticultural Society, said there had been a 
great unanimity of sentiment on the subject in 
that society. All the trees but two could, with 
fair treatment, be made to last fifty years. It is 
not as though the place had high walls on both 
sides of the street. Sue h fine specimens of trees 
are an ornament to pioperty, and an open space 
would be very much less desirable. 

Mr. George B. P:;mersou spoke of the sentiment 
of the matter; he had admired the trees for fifty 
years or more, and remembered the impression 
they made upon him when he first came to Boston. 
There are thousands who rarely have an oppor- 
tunity to see what is beaut. ful in trees. The 
English elm is one of the grandest trees in 
the woild, covers itself with an abundant, 
beautiful foliage and holds it 'onger than any 
othe'". He had hPiv ai-ked '»'he'i he fir?t came to 
the city, "Have you seen those old elms? and if 
you have not, you had better see them." This feel- 
ing of reverence is not a mere whim. It belongs 
to some of the noblest qualities of human nature. 
Thioughout Europe the highest people are the 
greatest lovers of trees. In England every gen- 
tleman is a friend of trees, and not one would con- 
sent to part with one of these if he had them. In- 
stead of destroying, it would be much better to 
improve them. Once he found men cutting the 
roots close to the surface; they were literally de- 
stroying the trees, whose roots are not deep under 
the surface of the earth. He did not believe the 
trees hiiidrn- the walkers there ; they divide the 
current. One impediment in walking the street is 
that all people do not keep to the right. He would 
pull down tne heavy wall between the trees and 
the burying ground, and replace it with an iron 



th"? soil beyond. In conclusion, he woull say that 
what favors the sentiment of beauty is more im- 
portant to the character of a people than any 
mere addition of dollars and cents. In reply to 
Allerman Clark, Mr. Emerson said it woul 1 be an 
improvement to throw a part of the burying 
groiin I in'o the treet. 

Mr. John D. Bryaut agreed with the last speak- 
er. This is the second time thee trees have been 
placed in jeopardy of life. They stand there, as 
the I etitioners say, a sentiment against progress. 
He referred to previous petitions and previous 
acts of the Board, and the escapes which the trees 
had had. In this case the committee reported 
that the petitioners have leave to withdraw, but 
some extraordinary influence must be at work to 
insist on their removal. One reason is ■ ufficient 
to settle the matter; that is, the majority of the 
people oppose the removal, which is i.ot required 
by public convenience. After remonstrances so 
numerous and weighiy, they sliouli be allowed to 
remain a thing of beauty, ornament and grace 
forever. Citizens have to come and repeat their 
arguments and contend against the secret, potent 
iniiuence at work. He had noticed the rapidi.y 
with which the Met o ;olitan Riilroad had put its 
tracks into every newly-vvidei.ed street, except in 
the burnt district, and he had no doubt tliis re- 
moval would be a great convenience to that cor- 
poration. 

Hon. Marshall P. Wilder thought that so much 
had been well said that he felc it unnecessary to 
add a word. He heartily indorsed every wora in 
favor of the perpetuity of the e historic ol I trees. 
Mr. Emerson has spoken cf the sentiment— the 
speaker believed it to be a moral and religious 
one. He claimed to belong to the progre- ive 
class, and if he thought the time had come for 
their r moval, he would sny amen; but no such 
exigency ha" arrived. Those trees could lie per- 
petuated ha'.f a century longer. Two or three 
are eyesores, which oaght; to lie removed, but 
they are not dangerous. In reply to Allerman 
Clark, he said he could not see why tliey were any 
great obstruction to public travel. Tlie widening 
of Tremont street has been a great benefit to the 
public, but there are special considerations which 
must be taken into account. He believed a street 
of forty or forty-five feet wide better for business 
than one eighty or a hundred feet. There woull 
undoubtculy be more room to hi<ve the trees re- 
moved, but he could not; say that their removal 
woull be a great improvement to Tremont street. 
He had been in favor of keeping th" oli trees in 
the centre of Franklin street. Of the present 
trees he thought two should be removed. 

Rev. Cyrus A. Bartol thought the opinion of the 
experts heard ought to weigh wjth the Board. 
Ihe greatest objection is that they are an obstruc- 
tion, but he hail been informed that the people 
who are most obstructed want to continue to be 
obstructed in that way. He thought the trees 
more than paid for the obstruction by their pro- 
tection of people from the sun in warm weather. 
The country would be better if there were not so 
many people driving along like Jehus: a little 
moderation would be a great benefit. The beau- 
tiful flowers on the Public (iarden may as well be 
considered an obstruction as those trees. He be- 
lieved that sentiment plant etl and nourished 
them; why should not sentiment retain them? 
These trees are lik^ and remind us of old people, 
and when the poet wrote those beautiful lines he 
probably had something like the veneration for 
old people in his mind. It is a doctrine thit those 
who cannot add to the wealth of the community 
should be removed; he hoped it woul I not be ap- 
plied in this case. Those trees would be sadly 
missed if taken away, but he did not think they 
obstructed the passage there any more than many 
other things. Two things shouli weigh with the 
Board; first, the opinion of these experts, these 
lovers of natural beauty; and, second, the leal 
honest feeling of the majority of the population. 

Dr. Oliver Av'endtll Holmes said he came at che 
request of others to show his sympathy. He had 
a fondness for trees. Walking to ehuich hard by, 
the obstruction he met with was not at the trees, 
but at the doors of Park-street ( hurch and Tre- 
mont Temple. Ic was not so pleasant to run the 
gauntlet of a crowded congregation as to cross 
over and pass under the shade of these trees. 
Some of these trees can be kept for fifty or a hun- 
dred years or more. He presumed many people 
had made pilgrimages to the Charter Oak. A 
grand olil elm is an object to which many pilgrims 
will go, just as they will to a lieautifal picture 
or statue. This sentiment is growing in 
this community. The duty of this genera- 
tion is to stop this destruction. There has l)een 
authorized and committed by the public nuthor- 
ities of this city such barbarism as wonl.l hnr. 



87 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 



tern, or prpserve the ante-revolutionary relics? At 
the dmrch in wliich he worships they reverence 
the crown and mitre of an order tliat had passed 
away. They were; preserved as historic relics. 
These trees aie amoiiK the fast decaying lelics of 
the past, lie ol)je(tcd al o to the suljject l)eing 
brouglit forward at tliis season, when the elms are 
in a state of beggarv; wait till June 'zO, when the 
weather is hor, and let the lioard adjourn to the 
mall, and if ihey would then vote to cut them 
down he would grind the axe. Alderman Steb- 
bins asked wliat historic: incidents were connei ted 
wiih the elms, and Dr. Holmes replied that it is 
the time whicli Ihey recalled. He did not 
care whether Mr. I'ad'dock was a Tory or not. 

Geoige P. 15aldwin, one of the petitioners for 
the removal, paid a tribute to the reputation of 
the previous speakers, and said he felt ihat the 
Board of Aldermen is peifeclly able to judge of a 
case of this kind. He had listened to ilie elo- 
quence, aiul almost thought himself in a street 
with winding paths bordered with nowers. This 
wa- a case of poetry and sentiment against the 
public good— wliich of the two shall be i-erved? 
In going to and from business he was dependent 
in a great measure on the horse cars, and all the 
poetry and sentiment had been taken out of him 
by running into one of the trees in his hurry to 
catch a car. If those trees were cut off twenty-five 
feeii from the giound they would be pronounced a 
nui-aiice by every one. There is a small portion 
ofthei-eisoa when they are beautiful. The fact 
that Mr. Pad;!oik was an old rebel robs the trees 
of very much of their historical interest. In regard 
to the suggestion of Mr. (juincy, that perhaps there 
would be only one track on'Tremont strett, he 
would as soon think the Board would take up the 
railroad track entirely as to leave only one. He 
expectei to see the street widened and'four tracks 
put down to accommodate public travel. The 
que tion is whether the Board should act in ac- 
cordance with poetiy and sentiment or the public 
good, and he was willing to trust the judgment of 
the Board. 

Mr. Peter T. Homer read a warrant for a town 
meeting in Boston on the 11th of March, 1771, to 
show how the fathers respected the Common and 
other public places. 

Mr. E Iward Winslow said it was a practical 
question. A majority of the people will undoubt- 
edly tnke a practical view of it. This practical 
tendency lias all eady obliterated a great many of 
the historic monumt nts of the i)ast, and this is a 
reason why we ^hould do all that we can to retain 
them. He agreed with Al lerman Clark's sugges- 
tion to move the wall back, which would give 
nourishment to the roots of the trees. AU trees 
are more or less conducive to health, it is well 
known, 'ihe obstructions there are much less 
than on the other side. If the venders of soda 
and peanuts were removed there would be no 
com; laint. He had consulted the opinion of many 
ladies, and had yet to lind one who favored the 
removal. He hoped an effort woulil be made first 
to preserve the trees. He should put aside all 
sentimeut, and hoped some compromise would be 
made. 

Mr. George S. Derby favored the removal of the 
trees. If any candid mun were to visit the Pad- 
dock elms about six o'^ lock, and see one portion 
of the crowd trying to force themselves up town, 
and anothpr trying to force themselves down 
town, while still anotlier pojtion try to stand still 
until they can get into a horse car, that can- 
did per oil must aumit that those trees should be 
removed. 'Ihe upper 1 mbs are in maiiy cases 
dead, and there is danger of their falling upon the 
passers by. Take the trees away, and the sun- 
ligh:. will'sooii liriiig out the branches of the trees 
on tho burial ground so that they will give shade 
on the street. Soinetliing better than these old 
worn-out trees should be preserved as historical 
relics. It is urged that they will stand tif ly years 
or more ; but is that a good reason for not lemov- 
ing them? Every great public improvement 
meets with objection ; all the great improvements 
in this city have been accomiilished, but the skies 
have not fallen, and the people appreciate their 
effects. 

No one else desiring to speak, the Chairman said. 
the hearing would be considered closed. 

Tlie miiioriiy report, with au order for the Su- 
periiit ndent of Streets to remove the trees forth- 
wiili, having licen substituted for the majority 
report (.leave to the petitioners to withdraw), the 
que tion was on the passage of said order. 

Al lenmii Cutter moved t'nat the whole subject 
be re ominitted to Committee on Common and 
Squares oa the part of t!ie Board. 

Al lerman Clark— I hope it will not be recom- 
mitted. The subject was referred to that commit- 
tee andbytbeiuiborpughlv investigated, if recom- 



ment that it received before at their hands. It wil 
oi.ly cause del.iy, and I hope the order will be put 
upon its passage this afternoon. I regret exceed- 
ii gly that evidence of a stionger nature has not 
been presented why we fhould not remove thefe 
trees; but I have heard no reason given which 
should change my mind or that of any member of 
thi-- Board, i was certainly surprised to hf-ar the 
first gentleman who spoke liring up the argument 
that ihe Metj o^ olitan Kailroad Company are the 
l)rojector.s of the petitions for the removal of 
thoi-e trees. 1 do not know that the directors, or a 
single person who owns any stock in that road, 
ha^eeven signed a petition for the reinoial, or 
have said a word in favor of it to ai.y member of 
tnis iioird. The petitions were got up by people 
who are generally in favor of i-treet improve- 
ments. For myself, I cannot stand here aiid vote 
a.way ten millions tf dollars of the pul/lic money 
for ihe improvement of the streets of Bo ton, as I 
have done, ami all r>w such an obstruction in the 
streets as is shown in that drawing, and which, 
were it in any otlier shape than these trees, 
these remonscrants would sign a petition to 
ha\ e removed. I do not propo e to make an argu- 
ment in favor of their remo.al, becau._-e 1 do not 
think it leeds any. I was surprised to hear Col- 
onel Wilder make so feeble a speech against tlieir 
removal. I imagine that if he had come here to 
argue ill favor of the reni(>val we should have 
hear i a differen* signipeut. He knows that they 
mu- 1 be removed, and that if we do our duty Me 
shall vote to have them cut down. I am not en- 
tirely devoid of sentiment. Even Mr. Emer.'oii 
acknowledges that the trees are an impediment to 
travel on the sidewalk, and suggests that we take 
down a part of the wall and widen the sidewalk 
instead of cutting down the tiees. I suggest, 
wheth'^r it is be.-t to take part of the bury- 
ing ground, or cut down the trees. I admit 
that John Hancock and John Adams may 
hxve passed by those trees. Well, sir, in the 
Mayor's room can be seen a representation of Tie- 
moiit street, as it was in iho e days. 1 know Colonel 
>\ il.ier would rot want to see Tremoiit street as it 
was two hundred years ago; he is too much in 
favor of progress. 1 am i ot in favor of toucliing 
a single' tiee on the Common ui.less public con- 
veiiicce demands it; when that time comes I 
shall le glad to make the improvement. I was 
gla I to h ar Colonel Wilier say he thought the 
widening of Tremont stiiet was a great improve- 
ment, bei ause some outciy was made against it. 
Who doubts that the cutt ng off of Boyl^toa street 
was rot judicious, and ought not to have been 
done? and yet tliere was a great outciy against 
it. There are a great many geiitlemen present 
who woul I be glad to express their opinion 
in f Ivor of the lemoval, but they do not clioose to 
come forw.ird and give iheir views. So we must 
act as we think best. The petitioners present have 
not been as numerous as the lemonstrants, be- 
cause tho e who signed the jjetitions are active 
business men, every one of whom is usually em- 
lilojed at this time of day; but if a vote were to 
be taken, I have no uoubt thrte-fourths of the en- 
tire voting population would dC' ide to have the 
trees removed. Oie tiling has been lo-t sight cf. 
It has been admitted by ihe remonstrants that 
three cf these trees, at least, are dangerous to the 
pullic, and ought to be removed. Now it is well 
known that if a limb shoi 1 ! be 1 down fiom one of 
those tiees and break a man's or a woman's aim, 
the city would be liable for the damage so 
done. There is no question atoiit thai. )f 
there is any necessity of bringing the proof, 
numerous letters can be produced to show 
that those trees are ^o decayed tnat they are dan- 
geious, and mai;y grnllemen can be bioughl for- 
ward to show that limbs have fallen off' those trees 
that woul I have killed a person haa thy struck 
him on the head. These facts aie susceptible of 
proof. There are cases of this kind which occur 
every yea;.-, to say nothing of the obstruction they 
areo'nihe sidewidk. They are dangerous to pulj- 
lic travel and Ido notthtnkl state it wrongly w lien 
I say that they are a constant source of anxiCty to 
the i olice Department. For these reasons i think 
■ that a recommittal cf the subject lo the commit- 
tee will re.. ult precisely as it aid b< fore. One of 
tho.^e genllcii.en who have rcmoi.snated seems 
to tak' the ground that the leport ot a majoiity 
must be adoptrd, irrespective of the feelings 
of the entire Board, it is noi unfiequent 
that the mino.iiy report is adopted in x. ref- 
erence to that o'f the majority. I wiU state 
further that had this matiei been sent to the 
Joint Committee on Common and i-quare>, the 
gieat majority woi.ld have bten in favornf the le- 
moval. 1 no not 'ot lieve that ihis imiiiense j ower 
behind the ihioneis the Meuoijoliian Railroad. 
I tlo 1 ot know that that corporation has asked to 



Fi^BRUATlY 24 



1874. 



88 



it of me. Horse railroads are a necessity, and I 
am in favor of granting them certain privileges. 
Boston is indebted for much of her growth and 
prosperity in the last teli years to her horse rail- 
roads. 

Mr. Emerson said he wished to correct Alder- 
man Clark. He proposed thit the wall should 
be removed for the benefit of the trees, and that 
the wall should be replaced by an iron fence. 

Aldem;in Clark — One other thing I will state. 
When this subject first came up, among orhers 
who sigi.ed tlie remonstrance was a gentleman 
wtU known as a business man in this city. It was 
IMr. Andiew T. H;ill; he headed the remonstrants, 
and ic was his name tint led me to suggest that a 
henring be given. The next season 1 met Mr. 
Hall, and he aid to me that those trees ougut to 
be cut down ; that they were an immense nui.-aiice. 
Although he did sign the remonstrance he consid- 
ered those trees a nuisance and an obstruction to 
public travt 1. Among other reasons for cutting 
them do wnis that it will let the sunlight into the 
buryinn' giound and improve the trees there. This 
year Mr. Hall ha? signed the petition for their re- 
moval, and were he not under a phy.-ician's care 
he would be here to^lay to advocate it. 

Alderman Power— 1 agree with the Alderman- 
■who has ja^t spoken, that the Met opolitau Rail- 
road are not the instigators of this niovement 
against those trees. Dp to the pre ent time there 
has never bt en a petition fiom that or any o.her 
company in favor of the removal, and 1 doubt 
very much whether any petition ever would have 
come here were it not started in this City Hall, by 
members of this Government. AVhen this sub- 
ject was first started this year, a gentleman had 
prepaied an order to have the trees cut tiown, but 
it was suggested that he had better wait and get 
up a pciicion, which would give it more force. 
Tliat accounts for the petition coming here at this 
time. The petitioners had to be sought out, and 
< arguineiit had to be used to get them. The re- 
monstrants have come without any seeking. They 
are gentlemen who carefully scrutinize every 
document before affixing their names to it. If 
the gentleman oppo-^ite (Alderman i lark) thinks 
that three-fourths of the people will vote for the 
removal of ihose trees, why iliis hai^te? "Why not 
give the people a chance to express their opinion 
on it? Why not give them a chance to vote upon 
it? If public S3iitiment is indicated by the pro- 
portion of the number of pe.itioners to the re- 
monstrants, it is plain that nine-tenths of the 
community are against cutting them down. I 
think that some new features have arisen here 
today. A gentleman has made a suggestion, 
■which, if carried out, may please all parties. It is 
propo-ed that the wall can be removed without 
inteifc'ring with the graveyard, or in any 
way wound the feelings of those who rever- 
ence that spot. Some arrangement of that 
kind might be maile, and therefore theie is 
good reason why it should be recommitted to 
the Committee on Common and Square , or to the 
Joint Committee. Why docs not the gentleman 
consent to try that? Why this haste when we 
have evidence that only two of the trees are de- 
cayed. A-; 1 have said before, thi- matter has 
never been brought up here except when the trees 
have looked their worst. W hy is it never tiied 
when they look beautiful and "are in foliage? It 
would appear to everybody that ihey have been 
wilfully ^ligh.'ed — thac soaie people have had a 
design tipo.) those trees; they have been cut and 
hacked, as it seeins to me, with the design of kill- 
ing instead of improving thein. 'Ihe gentleman 
speaks of the danger from tho' e tree.-. Why 
there is danger of a hou-e blowing down; 
chimneys often blow down; we walk in constant 
danger — an.l that is just as much an argument 
against any of the fine buildings on the puLlic 
streets. All this matter has be^n gone thiough 
-with before, and I suppose it is haruly worch 
■while to take up the time of this Board, ihere is 
no reason for haste, if the members desiie to 
give fan- play. There is no reason why the order 
should be rushed through at this time. If the 
gentleman opposite desiies that it should go to 
the Joitit Committee on Common and Squares, I 
have no objection, but it ill becomes this Board 
to pass an order to cut down tho;e trees in the 
face of the remonstrants who have appeared here. 
We have been sent here by the citizens of Boston, 
and intrusted with the alfairs of this municipal 
corporation, to act as we think best. \et, , 
when it is ijroposed to pass an order of 
this kind, to which nine-tenths of the citizens 
of Bosiou are o)jposed, i say this Board ought to 
bave respect for them, and look well into this 
matter before tht y go in direct opposition to the 
wishes of nine-tenth ; of the citizens. Therefore, 
I hope the matter w]" ' - . 



Alderman Clark— We have been accused of de- 
lay in this matter. It has been said that this 
thing has been brought up here year sfCer year 
and we have done no.hing. This argument of 
haste is one that the Alderman from Ward 12 
brings up when anything that he oppo-es is 
likely to be carried. It is true that we 
are the trustees of the municipality, and it 
is our duty to act according to our best 
judgment. I have great respect for the re- 
monstrants ; many of them are good clergymen, 
but they would not make good superintendents 
of sewers and streets. We have the entire ( om- 
mission on Streets in our f ivor, and it is known 
that the Superintendents of Sewers and Streets 
and the Chief -of-Folice think the trees should be 
removed. One subject has been alluded to, to 
which I did not have an opportunity to leply. It 
is that had the trees received proper attention 
they would not have been in their present condi- 
tion. That was intended, I presume, for myself, 
I having been chairman of the Committee on 
Common for the last two years. '1 he fact is those 
trees have been pruned of their rotten limbs so 
often that there is noihing life but the bodies to 
be trimmed. Ihey have received so much care 
already that there is nothing left to trim except 
the trunks. If they have become the receptacle 
of horse shoes, it lias been very recently. They 
have certainly received great care. I unaerstoed 
Mr. Emerson to say that it would be a great im- 
provement to cut down the wall. 

Mr. Emerson— I did not proi>ose it. 

Alderman Clark— 1 admit that, sir, but I only 
wished to show the fact. I suppose that some 
of the remonstrants think it would be a oecided 
improvement to Tremoi.t slreet to cut through 
from Park street at a great expense. Here is an 
improvement to that street that will i ot cost ten 
doll-irs, and yet those people come here ai.d ob- 
ject to it. I was a Utile surprised that the rever- 
end gentleman from JMan; hester (Dr. l)artol) 
should be so stiongly opposed to thatiminove- 
ment. It is not the kind cf doctrine chat he ad- 
vocates, if I am not mistaken he belongs to the 
order of progress, and I regret that he does not 
show some zeal in regard to this proposed im- 
provement of the street. 

Aide. man Cutter — I made this motion to recom- 
mit to the Coinmiitee oii Coinmon and Squares. I 
think that enough has been said this i,f i;ernoon. 
Certainly my sine has been ably sustained, it is 
old men for counsel, young men for war. The oli 
men have given counsi 1 here, and it is not due to 
them for members of tiiis Board to get up here 
and criticise their characters. 1 con.'-ider it due 
to them that this subject shall go back to the 
Committee on Common and Squares— the J ?int 
Committee. I see no reason why it should not go 
there. 

Alderman Clark— I was glad to hear the Alder- 
man admit that two or three of those trees shonld 
be removed. He has always opposed tiie ren.oval 
of any of them. 

Alderman Cutter — I made the motion, at the last 
meeting, that four or five be rcmo\ ed. 

Aldeiman Clark — That was ;if„cr he knew they 
would be lenioved. I think no better argtiuiei.t 
for removal has been made than the remarks of 
Colonel Wilder. 

Alderman Power— The gentleman opposite sta<;es 
that the Superintenelent of Saeeis and Sewers de- 
sire the removal of those trees. 

Alderman Clark — Allow mo to correct the Alder- 
man. The Superintendent of .'-trcets thi; k> they 
shoulel be removed; I eio not know that he desires 
it. 

Alderman Power— I have been in contact with 
those gentlemen as of ^eii as anybody el-e, and I 
must say that I never heord chfT" express such an 
opinion. If tins matter is referreel to the Joii.t 
Committee on Common and Sejuares — 

'Ihe Chairman- The Chair Will reiuinil tbe Al- 
derman that such a reference is not in oreler. 'i he 
authority is conferreel by the statute upon the 
Boarel ot Aldermen. 

Aleleiman Power — It seems possible that fome- 
thing might be eloiie which might be satisfactory 
to everybody — tliat some iinpiovcment might be 
maele there, that more room might be niaele there, 
anel that those trees, which aie in a thrifiy con- 
dition, might remain and the elecayeel ones re- 
moved. Tlierefore, 1 hope the matter will be le- 
cominitteei. 

Alderman Claik moved the previous question, 
and it was orelere-el. 

Aleleiman Cutter moved to lay the motion to re- 
eominit upon the table. 

Alderman Clark called for the yeas and nays, 
and the motion was lOot— yeas 5, nays 7, as 
follows : 

iilMMMlMHlMlMH 



89 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



Nays — Aldermen Brooks, Clark, Emery, Hall, 
Prescott, Stebbins, Worthington — 7. 

On motion of Alderman Worthington, the ques- 
tion on the motion to recommit to the Committee 
on Common and Scjuares was taken, and it wa3 
lost— yeas 5, nays 7, as follows : 

Yeas— Aldernien Bigelow, Cutter, Harris, Power, 
Stebbins — 5. 

Nays— Aldermen Brooks, Clark, Emery, Hall, 
Peters, Prescott, Worthington— 7. 

The question recurred upon the passage of the 
order. 

Alderman Cutter — As this seems to come under 
the head of the Paving Department I move to refer 
it to the Committee on Paving. 

Al lerman Clark— I raise the point that the mo- 
tion is not in order. 

The Chair u'led the point well taken, and de- 
clared the motion out ot order. 

The order for the removal of the trees forthwith 
was tlien passed — yeas 8, nays 4, as follows: — 

Yeas— Aldermen Brooks, Clark, Emery, Hall, 
Peters, Prescott, Stebbins, Worthington— 8. 

Nays— Aldermen Bigelow, Cutter, Harris, Pow- 
er— 4. 

AlJerman Worthington moved a reconsideration 
of the last vote, hoping it would not prevail. 
. Alderman Cutter — 1 am sorry to see gentlemen 
exercise so much haste in this mattci,tocut off 
the rights of the minority. Those trees have stood 
there for a century ; why should such a motion as 
that be made in this Board at this time? Let us 
have some respect for those trees, and not cut 
them down tonight. There is no necessity for it. 
I am sorry to ; ee this motion made to cue olf the 
rights of the minority. I trust the vote will be 
reconsidered. 

Alderman Power— I trust the vote will be recon- 
sidered. It seems to me that gentlemen should 
have more respect for the remonstrants than to 
pursue this course. Why this haste ? Does it not 
show conclusively that there is something under- 
lying this besides the public good— that there is 
some private axe to be ground ? 1 hope tlie mo- 
tion to reconsider will prevail. 

The Board refused to reconsider— yeas 4, nays 8, 
as follows: 

Yeas— Aldermen Bigelow, Cutter, Harris, Power 
—4. 

Nays— Aldermen Brooks, Clark, Emery, Hall, 
Peters, Prescott, Stebbins, WcTthingtou— 8. 

ADDITIONAL APl'ROPEIATIONS. 

Alderman Clark in the chair. 

By the chairman for the Committee on Finance — 
Report on the request of the Committee on 
Streets with an accompanying order authorizing 
a loan of .1260,000 to be added to a prior loan of 
$1,500,000 for the extension of Washir^ton street 
to Haymarket square, recommending the passage 
of the order. The rejiort was accepted and the 
order passed— yeas 12, nays 0. 

By Alderman Harris for the Committee on 
Sti eets on the part of the Board — Report that an 
additional loan of 5^1,620,000 will be required to 
complete the plan of street improvements 
instituted in the district burned over by the 
fire in November, 1872. The loans so far raised 
amount to $5,001,170 65. There had been expended 
to l<'ebruary 1, to pay for land taken and for build- 
ings, $4,2o6,131 22. Up to that date the paving 
had reached a cost of *81,100 36. $174 24 had been 
paid for expenses of advertising, etc. These, 
in all amounting to ,$4,.311,405 82, left a bal- 
ance of $739,770 83 from the original loans. 
Against that balance there remained unsettled 
claims for land damages estimated at .?1, 750,000. 
To tinii-h paving and grading the streets $400, 000 
will be needed; to pay for graue damages, $150,000. 
The expense attending the negotiation of the loan 
herein requested will be probably some $52,000. 
The total of these sums is $2,352,000, an excess of 
$1,612,229 17 over the remainder of the original 
loans. The committee recommend the passage of 
the accompanying order for an additional loan of 
$1,620,000: 

Ordered, That the Treasurer be, and he hereby 
is, authorized to boriow, under the direction of 
the Committee on Finance, the sum of $1,620,000, 
to be added to the Burnt-District loan. 

Referred to Committee on Finance. 

REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS. 

Alilerman Brooks presented the annual report 
of the Inspector of Buildings ; which was accept- 
ed and sent down. 

Number of Ferinits Issued. Fo* buildings of 
brick and stone, 640 ; for wooden and frame build- 
ings, 569; for repairs, alterations and additions. 
1151; total, 23L9. 

Brick. Stone and Iron Buildings. Fourteen of 
thes-e buildings were to be erected in Ward 1, 6 in 
Ward 2, 4 in Ward 3, 42 in Ward 4, 313 in Ward 5, 



Ward 12, 11 in Ward 13, 31 in Ward 14, 58 in Ward 
15, 9 ill Ward 16. Of these buildings, 43 were one 
fiiory high, 93 were two stories, 118 tlirce stories, 
301 four ,- todes, 88 five stoiies, 2 six storie-', 1 f even 
Stories; 215 had Man aid roof-, 401 hat loofi, 26 
pitch roof-, 4 hip roof-. 

Wooden Buiidinjs. 198 of these buildings were 
to be erC' te J in Ward 1 ; 49 iji Ward 7; 3 in Ward 
10; Sin Ward 11; 236 in Ward 12; 33 in Ward 13; 
70 in Ward 14; 170 in Ward 15; 139 in Ward 16. 178 
of these buillings were to be one story high ; 567 
two stories ; 158 three stories ; 398 were to have 
Mansard roof s 287 Hat roofs; 199 pitch I'oof.,; 19 
Lip roofs. 

The number of nolices received during the year 
to set furnaces and other heating apparatus was 
97. The number of buildings for which permits 
have bee u issued to hive repairs aid alterations 
made on them and additions built to them, is 1310; 
classified as follow : Repairs and alterations, 932; 
addit ons, 378. Total, 1310. 

JnsjiecUons. Tlie number of violations, etc., in- 
vestigated and reported upon was 1101, as f jUows: 
"Violations of statute, 893; violations of oruinante, 
208; total, 1101. The number of unsafe builiing.s 
examined and reported upon was 112; un-afe 
. wall-, 20; unsafe coiidce, 1; unsafe girder, 1; un- 
safe lintel, 1 ; unsafe feiice, 1; unsafe floors, 3; 
unsaf • h2ating apparatu , 16; dangerous chim- 
neys, 522; def jciive Hue-, 7. 

Completed Buildhv/s. The whole number of 
brick bull dugs reportea as being comj leted dur- 
ing the year is five hundred and iiinity-t e vcn (597), 
at an estimated cost of sixteen million one thou- 
sand two hundred and twenty-five dollars (■jl6,- 
001,225). These buil lings contain three hu'rdred 
and seveniy-tvvo (372j) stoies, and acv ommodate 
four hunched and eighty-four (484) families. A 
les- number of Ijuildinns have oeen com^ leted, 
and a less number of famd es accommodated than 
in 1872, but the number of . t''iesand the valuation 
has increased, as is shown by the following state- 
ment : 

No. of No. of No. of 

Buildings Families Ac- Stores Estimated 
Completed, commodated. Completed. Cost. 

1872 706 !WU H3 |7,U4:J,381 

1873 5:)7 4iS 372 l(j,Uul,225 

The increa'e in the number of stores is ac- 
counted for by the number cf buil lings which 
have been completed on the "Burnt District." 
The work of rebuilding that district is rapiiily 
piogressiiig, and up to date, two hundred and 
seventy-thiee (273) buildings have been reported 
as completed. Most of ihese buil lings are occu- 
pied Cither wholly or in part. 

One building has been completed and occupied 
on the di-trict burned over May 30th, and a num- 
ber are roofed in. 

Tlie whole number of wooden buil lings com- 
pleted during the year was seven hundred and 
twenty-o ,e (/2i;, containing sixly-eight (68) stores, 
and accommo uitmg nine hundred and twenty- 
seven (927) families. The estimated cost of these 
buil iiiifis was two million, three hundred and forty 
dollars ($2,000,340). 

The following statement shows a considerable 
decrease in the number of wooden buildings com- 
pleted in 1873 as compaied with 1872: 
No. of No. of No. of 

Buildings FamilijsAc- Stores Estimated 
Completed, commodated. Completed. Cost. 

1872 1034 1344 SK $3,147,535 

1873 TM M27 B8 2,000,340 

The whole number of buildings of all kinds com- 
pleted in 1873 was one theusand three hundred and 
eighteen, at a total estimated cost of eighteen 
mdlion one thousand five hundred and sixty-five 
dolhirs. 

Conclusion. A marked change in the manner of 
constructing buil iiugs has taken place during the 
year. The use of woo len exterior lii.ish has dimin- 
ished, and non-combustille maierinl .'ubstituted 
therefor. More attention is paid to the setiing of 
heating apparatus in buildings; ard standpipes 
and oi;lier appliances for cxoii;gui hing fires are 
being introauced. Ninteea of the completed 
bud lii gs on the burnt district are provided with 
standpipes, and they will probably be introduced 
into others. 

During the year an effort was made to evade the 
regiilaiions respecting the thickue-s ol vails for 
dwelling houses, which signally failed. We are . 
passing ihrough the same experiences that other 
cities have passed though ill their efforts to se- 
cure a safe me. hod of budding, and it is to be ex- 
• pected that opjosition will be met with, especially 
from persons who are interested in erecting cheap 
buildings intended to be ^old or rented as soon as 
built. These persons claim that to build twelve- 
inch walls s-o ii.ci eases the co^t of buildings as to 
prevent the erection of tenements for poor peo- 
ple, and they therefore want the thickne-s" re- 



Ji^EB BUiVB^ '^4i„ a8!J'4 



9^^ 



oup, for the dLfference in the cost between eight 
anfl twelve inthes of luickwork is but a tnne> 
which becomes insignificant wlieu the incj eased- 
security against the spieafl of file and the loss of ' 
life by filling walls is taken into corsideratioo. 
It is quite certain that no reduction of rents would 
follow a dimii.ution of tlic tliicliness of wall-. 
^ A large number of unsafe buildings have been 
examined during tlie year. The causes which 
rendered these bu'lilings unsafe are various, but 
arise principally from defective con' truction. In 
majiy cases the foundations were Liid on piles 
which were not cut off at proper grade, and had 
therefore rotted, causing the walls to settle, and 
throwing them out of )ilumb. In o:her cases the 
buildings were originally dwelling houses which 
had been altered for business purposes, wiihout 
any cliange being made in their construction, or , 
provision made for the increa'=ed weight impo ed 
upon them. Such buildings become perfect man- 
traps in case rf fire. In the alterations which 
have been made during the year, the department 
has endeavored to guard against ai y accidents in 
the future, and a number of perm'its have been 
refused because the applicants were > unwilling to 
take the precautions required by the department. , 

The suliject of fire escapes has received consid- 
erable .attention. This is a Mil ject in which every 
householder has a direct interest. If tlis number 
of cases in which lives have been lost for want of 
sufficient means of escape inca>eof fire were 
summed up the result would oe appfiUing. This 
department can require that fire escape > shall be 
pi iced upon tenement houses, hotels and build- 
ings in which operatives are employed, but hive 
no control over private dwellings, aiid ic tlierrfore 
becomes a personal matter with every citizen to 
see ihat his building is piovided witli ^ ome means 
by which the members of his faii;ily can escape 
from the upper stories in v^,ase the iire i^revents 
their escaping f I'om below. 

The work of the department has largely in- 
creased during the year, and the supervisi'^n of 
the newly acquired territory will add giea ly to 
its duties. In order to pe- form the w ork prope, ly 
additional assistaiite will be required, ami it is 
hoped that at an eailydaythe City Council will 
take into coii'ideratiou the expediency of provid- 
ing assistant-inspectors for the new district-. The 
department has been ordered to report to the 
Eoaul cf Aldermen all violations of chnpter o77 
of the Laws of 1872, rein ting to cellars below the 
established grade. This added to the duty im- 
posed by law of giving grades for cutting j iles 
renders the services of a person competent to per- 
form such work almost imperative. 

ASSISTANT CITY MESSENGER. 

Notice was received from the City Messenger of 
the appo ntment by him of Foster M. Spurr as 
First-Assistant and Henry 15. Lotts as Second- 
Asei^taiit in his office. The appointments were 
approved. 

BlSfORTS FROM THE FIRE COMMISSIOX. 

The ioard of Fire Commissioner , to whom was 
referred the petition in relation to the location of 
a steam fire engine and horse hose carriage, at 
Fome point between the Boston & Maine Railroad 
Depot and the Cu'tom House, having considered 
the suliject, report that in their judgment an en- 
gine and hose carriage should be placed within 
the points named witliout much delay; and that 
an amount sufficient for .he ijurcliase of a lot of 
land and building should be addeJ to the estimate 
of the Superint ndent of Public Buildings for the 
next financi; 1 year. 

The board report, in reference to the location of 
an engine house on Albany, near Dover street, 
that they had examined the district and are 
of o, iiiion that a new engine house is reciuired, 
but Tha.. the location mentioned is rot the most 
desirable. They re ommend as preferable, tnat 
an engine house be locate! on Harri- on avenue, at 
or near the coiner of Bristol st.eet. The board 
propose, if their policy is sustained by th-e City 
Council, to consoliilate Engine Company >Co. 3 and 
Hose C ompany No. 2, and to make ot them an 
engine company of permanently employed men, 
which woull le placed in the propo-ed house. 
Ihey would further recommend that the new 
house be built large enough to cortain al o the 
company and apparatus of Hook and Ladder No. 3, 
■which would in that event be move I from its pres- 
ent loca ion. 1 hey would further re ommend that 
the present house of Hook and Ladder No. 3 be 
retained in the use of the Fire Department as a 
buil ling well suited for a repair shop proposed to 
be e.-tabli hel. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Fire De- 
partment. 

OFFICERS IN CHARLESTOWN COURT. 

On motion of Al .erman Harris, the order to fix '■ 
the compensauDii of ench of the three constables 
ati en ling . he Muni ipal Court for Ch.aiiesiown Dis- 

iiliiiiiiiliiiiii 



Alderman Brooks — It has been suggested to me 
that a thousand dollars would amply pay the offi- 
cers for their service , and 1 move to amend by 
making it $1000 instead of ^120:). , v 

Aide man Power— I mo , e to st 11 further amend 
by making the salary §800. I have a few figures 
wh ch show conclusively, to m", that there are too . 
m injf men, and we have noihing to say on that 
que>tion, as the judge has the liglic. to select as 
many as he pleases. Pie has select"d three, the 
same number that they have in the Highland Dis- 
trict. In the Highland Dlst.ict there were 4091 
arrests last year, while in Chailustovvii there wire 
oiily 2800. lu only lecpiires three men in the Pligh-, 
land District, anil I think that two woidi be suffi- ' 
cient for Charlestown. But as we have no voice in 
fixing the number, I felu ihat the com j-ensaion 
oughu to be at this low rate in consideration of the - 
light duties to le peiformed. ;, • 

Alderman Peters — Since this matter was laid 
upon the table I have made some inquiries, and 
from all that I can leain all the assistaine thry 
had in ( harlestown, prior to annexati(nl,^vas one 
man. But since annexation the judge wished to 
put on a lit le style, and appoinicn two riiore offi- 
cers. The committee first voted to make the-sal- 
aiy ^12>)0. I th'nk that to have three- men sit 
round the Charl stown Police Court at 4^1200 a 
year i : a farce. I think the amendment of the 
gentleman f .om Ward 12 is a proper one. 

Alderman C ut er — It appears to me we are iiot 
intelligendy infoime.l on thissubjrci. 1 do not 
want lO do injustice to any one, and .therefore 
move to refer the matter to the Committee on 
Salaries. 

Alderman Power — Idovot object to the reference. 
I h > ve sought for some light and have go^ some., 

Aid rman Harris — I did not propose to say any- 
thing on this mat..er, because, as 1 ha; pen to tome 
from the Chailestown Di-tiict, though represent- 
ing the whol ! city, the members of the toard 
might think I was personally i-teresled, whi h I 
am not. Tiiat order, as originally reported, comes 
from the Committ e on ( ounty Act oiints, of which 
1 have the honor : o be cha i man. It was the iii an- 
iinous sense of tlie committee that tliis amount 
should be fixed. It simply provided for the 
compensation of the othcers of that court, 
who were appointed some time since by the 
ju.ige, who 1 suppoe we mu t take for 
granted, is comi)etent to know what the require- " 
meiits of the (ouit are. The juiige has full au- 
thority in the appointment cf these men. He 
stated before the committee that the gener,"l busi- 
jjcss of the court and the preservation of order 
require the services of tue-e men, and he was in 
favor of paying them a larger sum than even the 
committee recommended. The Board vvill bear in 
mind that all the fee-; of these officers for seaving 
writs, etc., are turned into the city treasuiy, and I 
fail to see where there i-; anycharge or incum- 
brance upon the treasury cf Bo. ton. I hope the 
ord'n- will pa«s. 1 have snftered it to lie upon the 
table something like a m.onth until every meml er 
could get familiar wdth the subject, and have 
been in hopes some otlirr member might move to 
take it from the table. 

Al lerman Power— I made a mistake. There are 
only cvvo persons em-loyei at the Highland-Dis- 
tricc Court, where they ha\ e the most ca.^^es, wliile 
in Chades own ih ■ number proposed is three. As 
we have no control over the number, we ousrbt to 
put the price so that it will not encourag^e the 
fois:ii.g upon the city of officers thai we have no 
xise for. 1 hope the order will be referred to the 
Committee on Salaries. Unlss they can show 
better reason for ihree officers than i can find, it 
seems to me we should not fix the salary at tlie 
rate proposed. 

Aliterman Harris^I have no objection to the 
Alderman liaving all tlij light he wishes. I am 
not t trenuous about this matter. It is immaterial 
to me whether the officers are paid .$800 or .'11200. 
I simply ofiered the order for the committee, ; he 
members of which scrutinize things prcity close ly. 
The gentleman has seen fit to compare the court 
in Charlestown wiUi that in Itoxbu' y. Ido not 
hesiuate to say that the former will be run as 
cheaply as the latter. In Charle tow n the court 
has but one clerk; in the Highlands there are two, 
while in Chaile town the olhcer- are comps He 1 to 
remove the prisoners to the court room, which 
they do not do at the H'ghPinds. 

The order was refeiied to the Cominil tee on 
Salaries on the part of vhe Board— 7 fur, 4 against, 
by a rising vole. 

THE WIDENING OF ATLANTIC AVENUE. 

The following was received : 

The petition of ,]o iah Quincy respectfully 
sheweth, that pttition have been piesented to 
your Board from th ' Old ( olony (lessees of the 
Union Freight) Rail oid, and from the faimers 
and market gar leners who briiig produce into the 



91 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



from tho Legi?lature which, if granted, might add 
to inercantil' facilities, and reduce, by a free 
market, tlie price of provisions without any ex- 
pense to the city; and, whereas, it appears, from 
the printed record of your doing'', tliat votes were 
influenced and said petitions rejected on account 
of a statement made by Alderman Stebbins of an 
opinion given to him by the City Solicitor on a 
con-titutionnl question as to the powers of the 
Legi lacure of Massachusetts ; and, wliereas, your 
petitioner has reason to believe that the opinion 
alluded to was given in a personal conversation, 
without the f-.ubniission of any question in writing; 
and, having reasoii to btKeve tliat the Alderman, 
in said conversation, did not clearly stats the 
point in issue, or clearly understand the opinion 
of the Solicitor, prays that your honorable Board 
will reconsider the vote by which you rejected 
said petitions, call on the' City Solicitor for a 
written opinion onaquetion submitted in writ- 
ing, and postpone, uniil such opinion is rendered, 
final action on an improvement which, without 
costing the taxpayers anything, may be worth 
millions to the mercantile and economical in- 
terests and development of the citj-. 

Respectfully submitted. Josiaii Quincy. 

Alderman Stebbins — 1 do think I stated, when 
this matter was up Ixst, that the City Solicitor 
said tliere would be constiaitional objections to it. 
I stated that it was his oj)inion that it would not 
be legal to make equitable charges for the use of 
a public street, but I do rot tliink he stated it so 
strongly as is put in this petition. 

Aldernian \\ orthington — I move a reconsidera- 
tion of th" vote rejecting the order, and if it 
passes 1 will move to lay it upon the table in order 
to keep it alive. 

The Chairman — The time has passed when a mo- 
tion for reconsideration can be entertained. The 
proper action would be a reference of the subject 
to tne Committee on Street*. 

Or- motion of Al lerman Worthington the petition 
was referred lo the Joint Commitiee on Stieet-i. 

THE SALARY BILL. 

On motion of Alderman Stebbins, the Board 
took up the order tixing the salaries of the city 
oflicers (City I'ocument No. 26), for the year be- 
ginning April 1, 1874. 

The sections fixing the salaries of the Mayor, 
Mayor's Clerk, City Treasurer, Auditor of Ac- 
counts, City Clerk, Clerk of the Common Council, 
Cleik of Committee-, City Messenger, City Engi- 
neer and City Surveyor, were passed, ihe amounts 
being tlie same as the present year, with the addi- 
tions for clerk hire recommended by the com- 
mittee. 

On the question of inci-easing the salaries of the 
first and second assi tants in the City Solicitor's 
office $500 each, ^Uderman Cutter desired to know 
some reason for the proposed increase. 

Alderman Stebbins replied that the committee 
were unanimous in the recommendation. 'Ihe 
gentlemen referred to are in the prime of life, and 
should be paid as much as they could earn if en- 
tirely di-connected froin the city. They do not 
now, as formeily, have leisure time to devote to 
private practice. 

Al lerman Cutter was sorry no better argument 
had been offered. It -was unadvi«able to cUscrim- 
inate, unless in the case of those wlio had been 
long in the city's service. There is the aged clerk 
of the Common Council ; if there is any argument 
fur increase, it is applicable to him as well. He 
opposed the proposed increase. 

Al lerman Stebbins said the work of the clerk of 
the Common Council occupied only a portion of 
the week, while the lalior of the Assistant City 
Solicitors was incessant, and they had been at- 
tended with remarkable success. He had been 
very agreeably suri)rised at the ability of the assist- 
ants; their records before the courts is good, and 
they are entitled to lecognition. 

Al lerman Prescott hoped the recommendation 
would be adopted. The business of the office is 
increasing, and tlie gentlemen are employed all 
the time. The salary named is not exorbitant for 
the first-L lass talent received by the City of Boston. 

Alderman Cutter referred to the increase of the 
assistants' salai-y last year, which caused f oine 
jealousy, and they divided it among themselves. 
The gentleman from Ward 8 may be a Utile better 
acquainted wiih the first assistant and may have 
had some conversation with him on the subject of 
salaries. He moved to amend by making the sal- 
aiy of each §501) less than was recommended. 

Alderman Harris moved to still further amend 
bv rrivini;; the first assistant $3300, and the second 
$2800. Lost. 

Alderman Cutter's amendment was lost, 4 for 
and 3 against; and the Board voted to make the 
salary of the first assistant $3500, and that of the 
second $3000, as recommended. 



Al lerman Brooks moved to make the salaries of 

the Street Co.nmissioners $4003 each, instead of 
$.3500 as at pre-ent. In the gentlemen compo-ing 
that Boanl the city possesses val lal l- talent. 
Other commissioners are paid $t000, whl"} the 
Street Commissioners' wo k is double, and they are 
ju'tly entitled to the increase. 

Al lerman Prescott seconded the motion. The 
duties of the position are onerou-, and the ser- 
vices are iiivalu.iblc to the ci;y. It was a simpls 
act of justice that the Street Commi sioners have 
as high a salai-y as the Fire Commissioners or the 
Board of Health. 

Al lerman Power thought the Street Commi"- 
Fioners were well satisfiea with th-^ir salaries, un- 
til th ^ salaries of the Boar I of Health and Fire 
Commi'Sioners were put higher than theirs. It 
woul 1 be better jiolicy to cut iiown the others be- 
fore increasing the.-e. It would be better to wait 
until an increase is asked for. It was not just the 
time to ii crease salaries. 

Alderman Fmery was opposed to making any 
generjl changes in salaries at thi> time, and he 
did not know th 't the Street rommi'sioners were 
dissatisfied. There was an inequality, however, 
but he would rather decline to cut down any sal- 
aries after they had been fixed. 

Alderman Biooks thought they should deal fair- 
ly with the officers of the City (ioveri.ment. The 
Street Commissioners have rriore resjioiiMbility on 
their s houl lers thon any other class, and the man- 
ner in which i bey have discharged their duties de- 
seives recognition. 

Alderman Cutter would rather level the salaries 
of the Board of Heal. hand Fiie Commissioners 
down to that of the Street Commis. loners than 
rai'e the litter. 

Al lerman Biooks's amendment was lost, and 
the salary was fixed as at present. 

Al lerman Cutter moved to make the salary of 
the clerk of the Board of Street Commissioners 
$1800, the samp as at present, instead of .$2000, as 
recommended by the committee. 

Alieiman Worthington moved to make it $2500. 
The duties are arduous, they are admirably dis- 
charged, and it is the duty of the city to pay him 
well. 

Alderman Cutter said the gentleman favored the 
department over which he had charge. Preference 
shoul I not be given one over ano.h'r. Things 
woul 1 get on much more smoothly to let the .'sala- 
ries remain as last year. 

AHei man Worthington was not prejudiced in 
favor of this clerk any more than others. But 
when a man earns money he shoul I have it. 

Alderman Cutter replied that other clerks were 
just as valuabl*^ as this one. When we (oullhire 
the same h Ip for the same money, we are not do- 
ing justly by the taxpayers to increase the sala- 
ries in these panicky times. 

Aide; man Prescott said the recommendation for 
the inerea'e came f.om the Street ( omti.issioners. 
The duties of the cl^rk are very onerous, and they 
are perform hI intelligently and effitieiitly. 

Al lerman Worthingtons motion was rejected. 

Al lerman Cutter's amendment was rejected— 2 
for, 9 against. 

On motion of Alderman Stebbins, the clause of 
the section if f erring to clerical services jieiformeJ 
for the Committee on Streets of the Al lerman was 
stricken out, after discussion in oppo.ition by 
Alderman Cutter, and in f ivor by Alderu.an Steb- 
bins, and the sum was fixed at $2000 as recom- 
mended. 

Section eight, fixing the salaries of the Inspector 
of Bull ling.> and assi tant=, was passed. 

Alderman Brooks moved to amend section nine, 
by making the salaries of the Fire Commissioners 
$3;00, instead of $4000, as recommended. Lost — 5 
for, 6 against. 

The question being on the passage of the sec- 
tion as reported, it was lo t by a tie vote — 6 for 
and 6 against. 

Aide .man Prescott moved to reconsider the vote 
fixing ihe siUaries ot the Stref^t Commissioners at 
$3500, and gave notice that if it was carried he 
should move to make the sum $4000. It was but 
justice to the Street Commissioners that they 
should have the same salaries as the Board of 
Health and Fire Commissioners; and undoubtedly 
some members had voted against making the sal- 
aries of the Fire Commissioners $4000, because 
that of the Street Commi s loners had been fixed 
at $3500. He was in favor of making the salaries 
equal. 

Alderman Emery was for standing by the com- 
mittee's report, and he could hardly see how they 
could increase the salaries unless tliey raise those 
of everybody connected with the City Govern- 
ment. It was not to be expected that the com- 
mittee should fix up a report to please everybody. 

Alderman Brooks supported the motion, saying 
that iniustice had been done in this case. 

- ' m 



OQ 



BOARD Oh' A L IJ E 11 M E N 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceeding's of the Board of Aldermen, 

FKBHIIAIIY ^<J, 1874. 



An adjourned meeting of the Board of Alder- 
men was held at one o'clock P. M., Alderman 
Clark, Chairman, presiding. 

PETITIONS REFERRED. 

To the Cotmnittcf- on Health on the ]iart of the 
Hoard. E. H. Learnard, to occupy wooden stable 
for two horses on Sparhawk street, near the mar- 
ket. Ward 19. 

To the Committee on Paviruf. Sidney Bartlett 
et at., that the Beacon-street aiid other sidewalks 
bordering on the Public Garden may be made safe 
against danger from runaway teams. 

F. D. Osgood et al., that the name of Washing- 
ton street be given to that portion of Shawmut 
avenue in Roxbury and West Roxbury. 

Edmund Rice, to be paid for grade damages on 
Market street. Ward 19; also, to be relieved of 
betterment assessed by the town of Brighton. 

KEMONSTRAXOE. 

The following was received and referred to the 
Committee on J_,icenses : 

To Bis Honor the Mayor awl the Board of Al- 
dermen of the City of Boston: (ientlemen— 1 have 
the honor to inform you that at the last regular 
meeting of the Boston Society of Medical Sci- 
ence the following resolution was unanimously 
adopted : 

"Whereas, The public exhibition of models, 
drawings, casts, photographs, etc., such as form 
the principal attraction at the so-called "Museum 
of Anatomy and Medical Science" of N. Hallock, 
now open to the public on Court street, and at 
that of Dr. Jourdain & Co., recently destroyed 
by lire, is, in the opinion of this society, piejudi- 
cial to public morality and decency, and calculat- 
ed only to gratify a morbid curic^ity, and to ex- 
cite unduly the apprehensions of sufferers, real or 
imaginary, from diseases of the genital organs ; 
therefore 

Resolved, That this society respectfully request 
his Honor the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen 
to refuse the application of Dr. Jourdain & Co. 
for a renewal of his license to open the said mu- 
seum, and to take such measures as may be neces- 
sary to close the museum of Dr. Hallock without 
delay. 

Respectfully submitted by 

James J. Putnam, Secv. 

Feb. 25, 1874." 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order to pay to J. W. Gerard, Jr., et al., 
11269 ee, for land damages on Williams street, 
West Roxbury. Passed. 

Order to allow $1000 for rent of armory of Com- 
pany K, First infantry, at Washington hall, from 
January 1, 1874. Passed— yeas 10, nays 0. 

Order to repair Lougwood-avenue Bridge at a 
cost of $750 ; to be charged to *'he appropriation 
for Paving. Passed. 

Order to pay Mrs. Sarah Bedford $100, for grade 
damages on Shawmut avenue. Passed. 

Order to appropriate the additional siun of 
.^292 48, for repairs on Dartmouth-street Bridge. 
Passed. 

Order to abate and change certain sewer assess- 
ments in Catawba, St. James and Warren street . 
Passed. 

REPORTS AND ORDERS. 

By Alderman Cutter, for the Joint Special Com- 
m'ttee on the Northampton-street District — Re- 
port recommending the passage of the following 
order: 

Ordered, That the owners of land« situated and 
lying within the district, in the city of Boston, 
bounded northwesterly by Washington street, 
southwesterly by Eustis street and Mall street, 
southeasterly by Albany street, and northeasterly 
by Northampton street, be and they are hereby 
severally noufted and directed to raise all buildings 
and fences upon, and remove all obstacles and 
rub bish from, their said lands an or before the tif- 
teen th day of April, A. D. 1874, so that the tilling 
of th e said lands to the grade of twelve feet above 
mean low water as established by an order of the 
Boird of Aldermen, passed September 1, 1873, 
may b e conveniently, expeditiously and thorough- 
ly do ne ; and in case any owner or owners of the 



said lands neglect or refuse to com))ly with this 
order, the city will proceed forthwith to raise said 
l)uil(lings and fences, and remove all obstacles 
and rubbish ; tlie expense of (h)ing wliich will con- 
stitute a lien ui)on said lands, and will be collect- 
ed as a part of the expense of filling said lands, as 
jiroviiled bv chapter 340 of the acts of the year 
1873. 

Amended, on motion of Alderman Stebbins, by 
inserting "and occupants" after the word "owti- 
ers," and passed. 

By Alderman Bigelow for the Committee on 
Licenses — Reports in favor of granting the peti- 
tions of A. K. Adams for leave to give a dramatic 
entertainment at Sumner Hall, March 3; W. T. D. 
Leavitt, to give concert at Tremont Temple March 
4. Severally accepted. 

By Alderman Harris — Order to pay Thomas 
Minns and others .'t!363() 25, for damages occasioned 
by the widening of Pearl street. Passed. 

By Alderman Stebbins — Order to pay S. B. Heus- 
tis, poli(;e officer, .$15, for extra .services at the 
i'hardon-street Bureau. Passed. 

THE PADDOCK KLMS. 

By Alderman Cutter- 
Ordered, That in the execution of the order for 
the removal of the trees on Paddock's Mall, ap- 
jnoved on the 2.5th inst., the Superintendent of 
Streets be directed to spare, until otherwise order- 
ed, five of the most thrifty of said trees, to be 
designated by the Committee on Paving. 

The order " having been read once, Alderman 
Prescott moved that it take its second reading at 
the present session. 

Alderman Worthington — I woidd like to know 
what the effect of the order will bo. 

Alderman Cutter — I offered the order after 
learning the sentiment of the commuuity on the 
subject. There are five of those trees which ex- 
perts say should be spared, and allowed to remain. 
The sentiment of the people, as near as I can as- 
certain, is that they shall not be taken down. 
We gave both the petitioners ami remon- 
strants an opportunity to be heard ; they 
came here and I might almost say ninety-nine to 
one were in favor of the remonstrances. There- 
fore we have not good ground to stand on if we cut 
down five of those trees. Those two, on each side 
of the gateway, should, at least, be spared. I can- 
not see any harm in this Board doing what a nia- 
jority of the community desire in this matter. 
And, furthermore, I have not been able to learn 
of one lady who would vote for cutting them 
down. I trust the order will lie over under the 
rule. 

Alderman Hall — Is this order propeilytefoie the 
Board? 

The Chairman — It is. 

The order was read the second time and, on mo- 
tion of Alderman Cutter, the yeas and nays being 
ordered on its passage, it was rejected— yeas 4, 
nays 7— as follows : 

Yeas — Aldermen Bigelow, Cutter, Harris, Power 
—4. 

Nays — Al lernien Brooks, Clark, Hall, Peters, 
Prescott, Stebbins, Worthington — 7. 

Alderman Stebbins moved a reconsideration, in 
order to have the matter settled, hoping it would 
not prevail. 

The Board refused to reconsider — yeas 4, nays 
7 — precisely as before. 

FROM THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

A request was received from the School Com- 
mittee for a joint convention with this Board on 
Tues lay, March 10. to fill the vacancies in that 
board by the resignations of Edward Wise of Ward 
il5 and benjamin Cushing of Ward 16. 

The Board concurred in the request. 

Requests were also received from the School 
Committee for temporary accommodations for 
the relief of the Union-street and Rockland School, 
Brighton; for the purchase, as. early as possible, 
of a lot of land oa Prospec't street, and the erec- 
tion thereon of a new sciioolhouse for the accom- 
modation of the Winthrop-street Grammar School 
in Charlestown ; and for an enlargement of the 
yard of the Everett (irammar School in Dorches- 
ter, by the purchase of an adjoining vacant lot; 
and for the purchase of more land for the new 
grammar school in Centre street. Severallv re- 
ferred to the Committee on Public Instruction. 

THE SALARY BILL. 

On motion of Alderman Stebbins, the Board 
took up the special assignment, being the order to 
establish the salaries of city officers (City Docu- 



F P: B R XJ A R Y 2 6 



1874 



93 



ment No. 20), for tlie year beginning April 1, 1874, 
tlie quesiion ))eing ou Alderman j'rescoti/s mo- 
tion 10 leconf ider the vote fixine; the salaries of 
the f treet Commisjioners at $3500. 

Allerman I'r pcott supported the motion, and, 
although a memhev of the Committee on ?;ilarieF, 
did not de ire to be held l•e^ponHiblf^ for every 
partictilar item in the repo.t, it woul I be i.c 
more than right to pay the Street C ommi^sior ers 
as much as was paid the Boai-d of Health and Fire 
Commis.'ioners, while it would be unjust to re- 
duce the salaries of thosf ollicers, so toon ift^r 
they had en.ered ujion the di chargi' of their 
duties. Thedut'e^of th'^ Street ( oa misf ion ra 
had Ijecome much more onerous and resionfcible 
in consequen( e cf annexation. 

Al lerman Cutter was tony the Salary Commit- 
tee had noi presented a rej)ort Ui on whiihthey 
coulJagrte. It might le best lo refomm'tthe 
report to the Committee on Salaries. Th'> Street 
Commissioners aie will ng to woik for the same 
pay, and work just as W( 11. The Boaru had a duty 
to perform, and he proi.osed to save the taxpay- 
ers' money rather than waste it, an<l he woild pre- 
fer to lower the sabiries of ihe Board of Health 
for the reason that the ordinance e talli hirg 
that board had been chmged so as to allow (he 
members lo engage in oher busine s. lor this 
reason it would be beter io i educe the salaries of 
the Board of He. 1th to ,*35l)0. 

iilderman Prescottunderr lood thai he was elect- 
ed to deal ju^ily and f filly by the officers cf ihe 
city. The ( iiyCouicil has iiot been ill the habit 
of waiting for officers to ask for an ir.create of 
s;'laiy. This Board did not wait last year for tlie 
efficient City Clerk to a^k for a vacation, which he 
shoul 1 have had eve. y year he has been iu i he ser- 
vice. The last <luty the ci.izen': of 1 o-ton will 
complain of will be the laiMi.g of the saL^r-es of 
resjioiisible officers in Ciiy Hall. 

Al leiman Bower believed the Street Commis- 
sioners pe form thsir duties as f liihfully and are 
as competent as any other officers iu Ci:y Hpll, 
but they had not a ked for an increaf e, ana he did 
not believe ai ybody world ha,ve askt'd fo. such 
increase had there not been a little jealousy. 'J ho 
principal reason urged for raisingche salaries if 
the Steet Commissioners was ihat the Fire ( om- 
missioners and Board of He; 1th have ^4000 a year, 
and Ihat is thought to be a ml' ctioii on ihe Street 
Commissioner . liut because the board of Health 
and Fire ( oinmissioi ers get more than they aie 
wor;h is no re ison the salaries of the istieet Com- 
missioners shoul I be iaised. lie was prepared to 
reduce the salaries of the Boar. i of Heal h and 
Fire Commissioners. J he board (f Heal h can 
cairy on any oih r business and that is a good 
reason why their salaries shor Id be reduced.' He 
hadf.ivoied giving the Fire Commissioners icSOOO, 
because they waiiicd men cf g.eat experience 
and knowledge in the business. But such men 
had not been selected. They lo doubt pe.foim 
the duties as well as they can, bu.; it was no argu- 
ment that because these men, having no expe- 
rience, get a large salaiy, that o. her men, having 
a large expeiiencp, shoi 1 l ha, e their siJaries 
rai ed. Instead cf increar ing, he ho];ed the board 
woull reduce some of the salaries. 

Alderman Broolcs did not think there was any 
jealou'-y. The mode ty (f the members of the 
btreet Commission would not fllow ihtm to a-k 
for an increase of sfdaiy. \\ h le in tlii- Board he 
piopo ed to ueai hoiie>tly and above board. When 
he ha<l found men who, lyiheir capabdi y and 
expe ience, save the ciiy alaige sum cf nioney, 
he thought it his du.y to consincr their ca e, even 
if ill ir modesty prevented themfiom asking for 
an increase of salary, the Street Commissiouertj 
n'ltend stri 1ly to their duties, and can always be 
found at their posts. 

Ab.eiiuaii S.enbi. s thought perhaps Ihe prob- 
lem could be solved better if the subjoct were laid 
upon th J ial 1 ? for awh le and be taken up 1 y and 
by. He moved lo lay the section oa the tai le. 

Al del man brooks (.ailed for the yeas and nay.s, 
and the motion prevaile-i — yeas G, nays 5. 

Yeas — Aldermen bigelovv, ClarK, Cutter, Power, 
Stebbius, Worthiiigton— G. 

Nays — Al iermen Brooks, Hall, Harris, Feters, 
Prescott— 5. 

Alderman Brooks moved to reconsider the voVe 

of the last eeting increasing the sal.aries cf ihe 

lirst and Secoiiu Assistant City Solicitors $.500 
each; and Alderman Cutter moved to recon' ider 
the \ote tixiijg the salary of the cleik cf the 
board of Street Commissioners at §2000, both of 
which nio'ions were laid upon the table. 

The section fixing the salaries of the Fire Com- 



missioners at $4000 was passed, and a motion to 
reconsider the vote, by Alderman Hall, was lost. 

Section fixing salaries of Board of Health at 
$4000 each. 

Alderman Cutter moved to amend by making it 
$3500, for the reason that the ordinance allows 
them to do other business. There is very little 
work for them to do, and in justice to the taxpay- 
ers the salary should be reduced. 

Alderman Prescott asked if the ordinance had 
not been changed before they accepted the po- 
sition. 

Alderman Cutter replied that it had. 

On motion of Alderman Prescott the vote on 
making the salary $3500 was taken by yeas and 
nays, and it was lost — Yeas 5, nays 6 — as follows: 

Yeas — Aldermen Brooks, Cutter, Hall, Peters, 
Power — 5. 

Nays— Aldermen Bigelow, Clark, Harris, Pres- 
cott, Stebbins, Worthington— 6. 

The section was then passed, aswereabo in suc- 
cession the sections establi hing the salai'ies of 
the Superintendent of Health at $3300 and the 
City Physician at $3000. 

Section fixing salary of Port Physician at $1000, 
and Assi- tant Port Physician (if such officer be 
needed) at $75 per month. 

Alderman Harris inquired who determined the 
necessity of having the assistant? 

Alderman Worthington understood that it was 
determined by the Directors of the House of In- 
dustry and the Committee on Health, after con- 
sultation. 

The Chairman read section 41, page 345, of the 
ordinances of the city of Boston of 1861, which 
provides that the Port Physician shall appoint an 
assistant. 

Alderman Power moved that the subject of the 
Assistant Port Physician's salary be laid over for 
the present, as he did not think there was any ne- 
cessity for the office. The duties were of so light 
a nature that the Port Physician could attend to 
them. 

Alderman Worthington said the Assistant Port 
Physician is stationed at Rainsford's Island, and 
the Port Physician at the House of Industry, and 
thej' are both constantly employed. It was neces- 
sary to have such an officer at Rainsford's Island, 
where there are so many poor people ; there is a 
positive necessity for the office 

Alderman Power understood that the Directors 
of Public Institutions were going to have the Port 
Physician removed from Deer Island, and if they 
did not want him there he could not see the neces- 
sity for two such officers. 

Alderman Worthington said that if he was re- 
moved from the House of Industry they certainly 
would need an assistant. The Port Physician 
examines vessels, and they only propo'^e to give 
him a ijlace somewhere else, to allay the fears of 
the inmates of contagious diseases. Ihat is the 
only objection he had heard to the Port bhysician 
being stationed at the House of Industry. 

Alderman Brooks thought it would do no harm 
to establish the salary, and if the assistant is not 
needed he can be discharged. 

The section was then passed, as was also the one 
fixing the salary of the City Registrar at $3000, 
and $1700 for his principal clerk, and $3160 for 
clerical assistants. 

Alderman Prescott moved to reconsider the vote 
fixing the salaries of the Board of Heallli at $4000, 
hoping it would not prevail, for the reason that a 
reconsideration of the vote fixing the salaries of 
Street Commissioners had been lef used. 

Alderman Cutter moved to lay the motion on 
the table. Lost. 

Alderman Power hoped it would prevail, for the 
reason that the most important ilause in the ordi- 
nance had been wiped out. Some of the members 
cf the Board of Health are doing a larger business 
than before, and for that reason the salaiy is ex- 
traordinarily large. One cannot serve two mas- 
ters ; where they have their own business that 
must be attended to, and the city's business will 
be neglected. It is out of all reason that their 
salaries should be $500 more than the Street Com- 
missioners. 

Alderman Harris asked if the ordinance relating 
to the Board of Health had been modified. 

Alderman Power explained the ordinance; the 
clause forbidding them to engage in other busi- 
ness had been stricken out. 

Alderman Prescott asked if it was not done pre- 
viously to these gentlemen accepting the positions. 

Alderman Power said it had ; through the influ 
ence of one member the Board was prevailed upon 
to strike out that clause, and if some gentlemen 



9 4 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



■had the power to vote upon it again they would 
reenact it. 

Alileiman Worthington did not think they could 
faiily reconsider I he niotioj. All will renlember 
that Mayor Gaston tried to get gentlemen to take 
thj position, hue found it nnpoisible to get the 
riglit men to accept it with the clause in. When 
Mayor l^ierce cani(> in it was by common consent 
abolislied. One of two things .shouKl be done — 
pay tliem thut money or abolish the office. The 
Board should deal liouorably with them as they 
would wiih individuals. He believed the Board 
of Health are enileavoring to do their duty, but 
tliey liavf liardly begun their work. 

Alderman Cutter asked if their duties were not 
less arduous now tlian when tliey were appointed. 
Alilernian Worthington replied that they were 
not; th 'ir duties are increasing eveiyday; they 
are looking after the general liealth of the city. 
Gentlemen vvill remember how strongly they took 
hold of the smallpox. Give them a chance. We 
all remember that Charles Sumner filled the posi- 
tion of .-enaior of the United States for a year 
befOiC he made a single speech, but how would it 
have looked tlie^v for the State to have said he had 
done i.o.hing, and ask hiu to resign. He was 
studying the iiusiness of the Senate. The e men 
are siuaying and learning their duties and we 
shall tind iu the course of the year an inii)rove- 
ment in the general health of the city, 'the gen- 
tleman fioin Ward G opposed the Oider to place 
the Inspector of Milk in charge of the Board of 
Health, because that is the oi.ly department which 
is responsible to the Board of Aldermen; he wants 
to keep a little power in our hands. That is a poor 
argument. We are under an obligation to give 
the iioa;d of HeaUh a chance and to continue their 
salaries at ?j4!)00. 

Alderman Cutter said his remarks were that the 
office of tlie Inspector of Milk had been as eco- 
nomically run, if not more so, than any other in 
City Hall. Tue gentleman f.om the Highlands 
himself (lid not see why it sliould be changed and 
maile a motion to lay the onler upon the table, 
showing conclusivtly that he did not know any- 
thing about it. He proposed to know what he is 
doing in this Board and not introduce every order 
lef V on his desk. There is no question that the 
duties of the Board of Health are less arduous 
than they were a year ago, and they are reaching 
out to get the inspector of Milk, tie stood there 
to defend the taxpayers, who pay the bills and 
should have a voice in the Government. The mem- 
bers of the Board have a stewardsiiip to account 
for; let them do their duly under all circum- 
stances without fear or favor, and the taxpayers 
will reward them. 

Alderman l^ower said the salaries were estab- 
lished for one year. No one could dispute the 
f ac. that when tne smallpox was raging the Board 
of Health did all they could. But the smallpox 
has been obliterated and he did not see how any 
one could say their duties are as arduous now as 
they had been. There was, therefor*>, good rea- 
sons why they should reduce these salaries, but he 
did not \visli to be understood as assailing the 
Board of Health. He had worked a whole year to 
perfect that ortlinance, but the most important 
clause was wiped out, and gentlemen in this 
Board who voted to do so have regretted it ever 
since, for it could not but impair the usefulness of 
that board. No one can say when they shall or 
shall not be here. 

The Chairman read section five of the ordinance 
establishing a Board of Health, providing for the 
members holding office for one, two and three 
years respectively. 

Alderman Worthington was obliged to the 
Chairman for reading the section;' those men 
were selected for one, two and three years, with 
the direct understanding that they should have 
f4000. The city could not get the gentlemen it 
wanted under the clause referred to. 

Alderman Emery said the salaries were fixed 
not only for that particular exigency, but with a 
view to tlie future. They did not expect the 
smallpox to rage in the city all the time, but if it 
was *4000 would be very small compensation. He 
was for standing by the report of the Committee 
on Salaries, who, he supposed, had given better 
attention to the subject than any one member 
could. He should vote against reconsideration. 

Alderman Bower did not suppose the Committee 
on Salaries could give any better reason for report- 
ing 5i;4000 than that they found it on last year's 
bill. What the salary has been has nothing to do 
with what it should be. There is not a member 
who thinks the Board of Health so well qualified 



to do their duties as the Street Commissioners, 
who were chosen because of their long experience 
in thit business. '1 he salaries of the Board of 
Health are too high, and there is every reason 
why they should be reduced. 

Alderman Stebbins did not know th-^t the Comr 
mittee on Saliries examined each itt a bv itself 
and came to the conclusion that they did. But 
they were unanimous that the duties of th > Board 
of Health require their entire time ; that the mem- 
bers of that board are competent to dis( harge 
their duties, and were entitled to .^4000 salary, and 
he saw no reason for a cliange. He placeii but 
little weight to the striking out of 1 he tLuise re- 
ferred to, for the board are giving th ir entire 
time to the service of the city, working a- many 
hours a-i the heads of other dei)artments do. In 
the ordinance-; relating to the o her dei)ar;ments 
th'^re is nothing requiring the officers to devote 
their entire time to the city, and the only excep- 
tion to the rule is Uiat in relition to the Fire De- 
partment. The public think the Board of HeaUh 
earn §4000, and will stand by the Aldermen in vot- 
ing for it. 

The motion to reconsider was lost — yeas 5, nays 
7 — as follows: 

Yeas— Aldermen Brooks, Cutter, Hall, Peters, 
Power— 5. 

Nays— Aldermen Bigelow, Claik, Emery, Har- 
ris, Prescott, Stebbins, SVoithington— 7. 

Order fixing salary of Inspector of Provisions at 
$2000. 

Alderman Harris asked why this office is essen- 
tial, as the Superintendent of Faneuil-Hall Mar- 
kets is invested with the same power. 

Alderman Stebbins said the office was created 
in 1871 or 1872, when the city got the power from 
the Legislature. The Superintendent of Faneuil- 
>^ Hall Markets performs the duty in the immediate 

vicinity of that marke;", and cannot go out of those 
limits. The Inspector goes out to all parts of the 
city and intercejits wagons bringing meat into the 
city. 

Alderman Cutter asked if the Inspector ever 
visited Blackstone Market. 

Alderman Stebbins said he did not know, as he 
did not buy his meats there. 

Alderman Cutter said that if the Inspector did 
go there he did not have the right kind of an effect 
on the meat. 

The question being taken on the passage of the 
order, it was lost — 6 foi and 6 against. 

The Chairman stated that if it is not proposed to 
strike out the order entire, it is necessary to fix 
some sum. 

Alderman Cutter said that if the Inspector is to 
be appointed he ought to have $2000. 

Alderman Prescott moved a reconsideration of 
the last vote. He thought the saLiry shoul I be 
fixed; if the Alderman from the Charleitown Dis- 
trict wanted to abolish the office he should take 
the proper course. 
The vote was reconsidered — 7 for, 5 against. 
Alderman Harris moved that the order be strick- 
en out. 

Alderman Stebbins caUed attention to the fact 
that by the terms of annexation Charlestown has 
no Inspector of Provisions. 

Alderman Harris said they had no market house 
either. 

Alderman Stebbins replied that he supposed 
then that the people there did not use meat ; but 
people in other sections do, and need an Inspector. 
This officer does good service ; he is up at all 
hours. lUackstone Market has given him more 
trouble than any other in the city. 

Alderman Worthington did not like the way 
they were treating the subject ; if the Aldermen 
wished to abolish the office they should repeal the 
ordinance which establishes it. 

Alderman Harris inquired if the act was not 
covered by section eleven, relating to the Superin- 
tendent of Faneuil-HaU Market and the Deputy-r 
Supeinteudent. 

Alderman Stebbins said the Superintendent of 
Faneuil-Hall Markets has no power to go out of the 
market building. The object of the law is to have 
an officer who shall go to the outskirts of the city 
and intercept teams as they come in ; for instance, 
in the spring, when they bring in slunk veal to sell 
to poor people. 

Alderman Hall inquired who the gentleman 
holding the office was, where he could be found, 
and what were his qualifications. 

Alderman Stebbins referred the Alderman for 
his qualifications to his Honor the Mayor, and he 
could be found in the saddle early every morning, 
before the Alderman from Ward 10 is up. 



FEBRTJAR-Y 36, 1874r. 



95 



Alderman Hall was very fond of riding in the 
saddle early in the morning, but did not feel like 
voting a man 5f2000 for doing it. He hoped they 
■would not establi h a snlary for an officer that no- 
body knows anyihing of. 

Alderman Brooks agreed with the Alderman 
from Ward 8 in regard to the necessity for an in- 
spection of meats, and had no doubt this was an 
Important posilion. He thought it worth more to 
the city than the Hoard of Health, and it would 
be belter to reduce that board to one man and 
thus i-ave fome money. 

AUlerman I'rescott did not like to hear the dis- 
cussion ; the order had better be laid over in order 
that gentlemen might inform themselves of the 
ottice and how the othcer tills the position. He 
moved to lay the order on the table. Carried — 8 
for, 2 against. 

Alderman Cutter moved to recommit the whsle 
matter of salaries to Ihe committee. 

Alderman Prescott had no objection to a recom- 
mittal. 

AMerman Cutter thought committees should 
make reports that they could explain and back 
up. 

Alderman Prescott said the committee reported 
the salary of Inspector of Provisions at $2000 be- 
cause they knew no reason for a change. 

Alderman CiiUer said that Alderman Power .sup- 
posed the salary of the Board of Health was re- 
ported at .ii;4000 for the same reason. 

Alderman Stebbins ilid not admit any ignorance 
as to the dvities of the I'lSiaector of Provisions ; he 
should receive $2000 a year; lie was to keep a horse 
and carriage out of that sum. The Alderman de- 
fended the report of the Salary Committee, and 
expressed suri)rise at the onslaught made on the 
Board of Health. 

Alderman Cutter said they should agree upon a 
report .and stand by it. They had reported the 
salaries of the Street Commissioners at ,ii;3500, and 
one member had advocated §4000. 

Tlje motion to recommit was lout. 

Aideruiau Peters moved to adjourn. Lost. 

The sections establishing salaries were success- 
ively i)assed as follows: Superintendent of the 
Public Library, $3000 ; Superintendent of Common 
Sewers, .$3.300 ; Superintendent of Streets, $3000; 
Superintendent of i ublic Buildings, $3t00; Super- 
intendent of Public Lands, $1800; Superintendent 
of Printing, $2,000; Siipe'intendent of Faneuil- 
H?ll Markets, $2500; Deputy-Superintendent of 
Faneuil-Hall Markets, $1500; Superintendent of 
FaneuQ Hall, $500. 

Section fixing salary of Superintendent of 
Lamps at $3000. 

Alderman Hall asked that the sum be made 
$3500, and said that the Superintendent of Lamps 
has no assistant as the Superintendents of Streets 
and Public Buildings have, and his salary was not 
increased two yeai's ago when the others were ; he 
is required to be up both early and late attending 
to his duties. 

Alderman Peters wished to add a word in favor 
of this increase. The Superintendent of Lamps 
has no assistance in the territory lately annexed 
to the city. The whole expense of conducting the 
office has been but f 1100, besides his salary of 
$3000. He takes the whole care of the department 
himself. 

Alderman Cutter said that if he remembered 
rightly the salary of the Superintendent of Sewers 
was not increased two years ago. 

Alderman Peters said there was another reason. 
The present Superintendent of Lamps is a man in 
the prime of life, and as they expect that gentle- 
men in the prime of life will increase and multi- 
ply they should supply the means to increase and 
multiply upon. 

Alderman Cutter said there seemed to be two 
arguments for increase of salary; first, "the head 
of the department of which I am the head," and 
second, "he is in the prime of life.' He believed 
they should increase all alike if they were going 
to increase at all. The Superintendent of Public 
Lands had not had an increase of salary for several 
years. 

Alderman HaU said the duties of the Superin- 
tendent of Lands had become almost nothing, 
■while the duties of the Superintendent of Lamps 
increase every day. A comparison of the two 
offices will be favorable for the Superintendent 
of Lamps. He has to superintend every branch of 
the work, and every order for the repair of a lamp 
has to go from his office. 

Alderman Cutter said the duties of the Superin- 
tendent of Public Lands had been verv much in- 
creased by annexation. The same "argument 



would also apply to the Superintendents of Sewers 
and Streets. 

Alderman Emery, although indorsing the views 
of other gentlemen in regard to the Superintend- 
ent of Lamps, would stand by the report; though 
he had been very much suiprised tl-iit the com- 
mittee had not increased the salaries of both the 
Superintendents of Public Lands and of Lamps. 

'the motion of Alderman Hall to make the sala- 
ry $3500 was lost— yeas 4, nays 8. 

Yeas — Aldermen Brooks, Hall, Prescott, Peters 
—4. 

Nays — Aldermen Bigelow, Clark, Cutter, Em- 
ery, Harris, Power, Stebbins, Worthington — 8. 

Alderman Harris moved to make the sum $.3300. 

Alderman Prescott, even at the risk of being ac- 
cused of trying to slaughter his own reporl^, hoped 
the motion would prevail. He was ready to re- 
ceive new light. The committee had not had 
time to make a thorough examinatiou of all the 
departments, but if gentlemen say that a raise of 
two or three hundred dollars in particular cases is 
justifiable, he was ready to vote for it. 

Alderman Power thought that the responsibili- 
ties of the heads of other departments had been 
enhanced a great deal; he had not advocated an 
advance in their salaries, because of the burdens 
the city has to bear, and the expenditures neces- 
sary to make this year ; it is not a good time to in- 
crease salaries. 

Alderman Emery said that as tli" Committee on 
Salaries are not agreed upon their report, he 
should feel justified in voting for the increase, in 
this case. He had supposed the committee had 
made a thorough examination of the whole sub- 
ject 

Alderman Cutter said the last speaker had pass- 
ed by the Superintendent of Public Lands, whose 
salary had not been increased for several years, 
because the committee recommended it. He 
thouglit the subject deserved intelligent atten- 
tion, and that was why he moved to recommit. 

Alderman Emery did not propose to s^^and by 
the report unless the committee stood by it them- 
selves. They seemed to disagree among them- 
selves, and he felt justified in taking the course 
he did. 

Alderman Hall spoke of the onerous duties of 
the Superintendent of Lamps, who has to be out 
late in the evening and early in the morning to 
see that the regulations are carried out, while 
some other heads of departments do not come to 
City Hall till nine o'clock in the forenoon. 

Alderman Cutter did not like the idea of gentle- 
men trying to raise the salaries in departments 
with which they were connected. 

Alderman Hall said he could vouch for one 
morning when the Superintendent of Lamps went 
out early in the morning, for he went with him, to 
Charlestown to see if the lamps were propeily put 
out. 

The Board voted to make the salary $3300— yeas 
7, nays 5— as follows : 

Yeas — Aldermen Brooks, Emery, HaU, Harris, 
Peters, Prescott, Worthington— 7. 

Nays — Aldermen Bigelow, Clark, Cutter, Power, 
Stebbins— 5. 

The section was then passed, as amended, by the 
same yea-and-nay vote as the last. 

Alderman Peters moved a reconsideration. Lost 
— yeas 2, nays 8. 

Yeas — Aldermen Cutter, Power — 2. 

Nays— Aldermen Bigelow, Brooks, Clark, Emery, 
Hall, Harris, Peters, Prescott, Stebbins, Worthing- 
ton— 8. 

Sections fixing the salaries of various superin- 
tendents were passed successively, as follows: 
Neponset Bridge, $300; Granite Bridge, $250; East 
Boston Ferries, $2500; Boston Lunatic Hospital, 
$2200 ; Master of House of Correction, $2000 ; Super- 
intendent City Hospital, $2500. 

Section fixing salary of Superintendent of Com- 
mon and Public Grounds, $2200. 

Alderman Brooks moved to make it $2500. 

Alderman Cutter moved to make it the same as 
last year, $2000. 

Alderman Hall said he would vote for that, pro- 
vided the city would allow him a horse and wagon. 

Alderman Cutter objected to that, as it would 
cost $1600. 

Alderman Power said the officer was formerly 
allowed $500 for the use of his horse and carriage, 
but since the law forbidding officers to have any 
interest in contracts with the city had been 
passed, he could not be paid for the use of his own 
horse, and his salai-y had virtually been reduced 
$500. In regard to the present incumbent he had 
nothing to say. 



96 



BOARD OF AI^DKRMElSr. 



Alflcrrmn Cutter f aid he iinderftood that the 
Bo:ird hnd not jiaid liim for horse hire, but the 
coirmitiee liid ; llowcd liis bill. 

j\li!ermaii Cuiler in the eh lir. 

Al lei mnii CI irk f ,'lt it his (hity, as chairman of 
the Coiiiiiiittee on < omnioi), lo Fay a word. 
If the Supei iiiieudeui of Common is euti- 
11 (1 io umle. take the duties of th; office, he is en- 
ti.liMl to th ' iiH rease. If he i-^ not, then the mem- 
bers of the IJoard have str.ltified themselves by 
ijiianiinou'ly elpciint? him. ''he Supeiintendent 
of Common keojjs liis own horse and carriage, 
and pay.- his own bill ; out of ihe 5?20OO salary, and 
he does not receive >o much as he did three years 
ago. 

Alderman Clark in the chau'. 

Alderman Cutter ha i nothing to say in regard 
to till' ccmpeleniy cf ihe officer, but he had 
Ftatcd to the Al lehnaii that he is satisfied with 
his t ; laiy, and if he is it did nol become the Board 
to put ibis adi'iiion 1 burden on the ciiizens. 

J Merman Hall asked if the statement was not 
on condition that the citywoull furnish a horse 
and vrhii 1?. 

Al lermau Cutter said that was the first informa- 
tion h • had of ir. 

/I lermau l'. rooks thouglit he could not be 
accused of favoritism 'n this case, a- he was not 
in that department, but he thought the officer 
de erved to have $.500. The siilary had not been 
incraased when those of the other supeiintendents 
we e. 

Alderman Stebbins said the matter had been 
dicu^se.l by thi! < ommitlee, and they had recom- 
mended an luciea-e of $200. 

jM lermau' Power would vote to make it $2500, 
becau'-e it would be giving just what the officer 
h id leceiiCd bcfoie. 

1 h'^ 1 oard voted to make it $2300— yeas 8, nays 
4, rs follows : 

Yeas — Al lermen Figelow, Brookr, Clark, Em- 
ery, Hf r, Fowei-, Prcsco.t, Worthington — 8. 

Nay — Aldermen Cutter, Harris, Peters, Steb- 
bins — 4. 

The section was then passed as amended— 8 for, 
3 against. 

Sections were then passed fixing salaries, as fol- 
lows: Superintendents of Tiucks and Wagons, 
Pawnbrokers' and Intelligence Offices, each $4 per 
d.ay, and their assi>-tants each $3 50 per day; 
Ctiicf-of -Police, 53000; Deputy do., $2500; Clerk 
do., tliOJ; Captains, ,$4 per day; Lieutenants, 
^o tOierday; Sergeants, $3 25 per day; Patrol- 
men, $3 per (lay. 

Section fixing salary of chairman of Board of 
Asfes oi'sat $;500 (an increase of ^ 500), of other 
memb' rs at $3000. 

Aldeiman Cutter moved to strike out $500 from 
th ; chiirman's srlary ; he did not know any rea- 
fOii why the f haiiman should have more than the 
other members. 

Al lermau Stebbins said this was an increase 
that i-lKJuld be made above all others. If there is 
a man in l"o ton who ha- done f lithful service in 
the last ten year.; it is 'Ihomas Hill , chairman of 
the Board of Assessors, it was made without any 
apilication. He believed in gtfcirg the bes.t men 
and advancing their sal iries without asking for it. 

Al lermau Cutter said it was very i leasant to 
recommead and vote for an increase of salary, 
and have the gentleman come round pf terwasd 
and t h ike you by the hand and return thanks for 
it; but he piopo,-ed to do his du.y by the taxpay- 
ers. It is not conrlu'dve that Mr. Hills will be 
churman of the i-oard of Assessors; that board 
elect their own chaiiman. Why not put his 
name in the order if the money is intended for 
him? 

Alderman Stebbins said the City Council under- 
stood it very well. If the Board of Assessors 
elect an incompetent person to that podtion, he 
thought the C ity Council wcmll see something 
about the salaries. .All that the Alderman from 
W.ird G had doi:e for the city i •■. no hing in compar- 
ison wi.h what Mr. Hills had done; Mr. Hill-i had 
(loiu' more in one day than the Alderman coultl do